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October 23, 1981 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-23

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iRT
The Michigon Daily .Friday, October 23, 1981

Pcag

Giant rabbit
breeds fun, but
'Harvey' is off

e 7

JLW I

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4

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s

Gwendolyn Y. Ricks and Mikell Pickney: 'Don't Bother
Me, I Can't Cope.
Cope:
black perspective

By Pam Fickinger
PENING NIGHTS are tradition-
I ally a little rough. Just ask any ac-
tors about those butterflies when they
first face an expectant audience. It's
also traditional, however, that most
performers-after getting over the
initial shock of seeing all those waiting
faces-forget the audience and get
caught up in their performance.
Unfortunately, the cast members in
Ann Arbor Civic Theatre's production
of Harvey, playing through Saturday at
the Michigan Theatre, take more than
those first few moments to develop
their characters.
Harvey is thestory of one Elwood P.
Dowd, whose best friend is a pooka (a
fairy spirit that' takes the form of a
large animal). More specifically,
Elwood's pooka is an invisible (to
everyone but Elwood) giant white rab-
bit named Harvey. Much to the chagrin
of Elwood's family, Harvey accom-
panies his friend everywhere, and
Elwood makes certain there are always
proper introductions.
So this is the story of some "crazy"
who thinks he sees a giant white rabbit,
right? Wrong. It's also a story about
being able to accept people for what
they are. A lesson, thanks to Elwood
and Harvey, that is well-learned by the
end of the play.
Unfortunately, the actors don't take
full advantage of Mary Chase's script.'
The character portrayals just don't
quite make it.
Granted-Jimmy Stewart, who
played Elwood in the film version of
Harvey, is a hard act to follow. But in
the Civic production, William J. Cross
offers a very weak portrayal of the
pooka's easygoing friend. Even more
distracting than botched lines is Cross'
tendency to lose track of Harvey's
height, gazing at all different angles
throughout the performance.
And it isn't until the second act that
Bette Ellis comes into her character as

Veta Louise Simmons, Elwood's society
sister. Her fight to have Elwood com-
mitted, so that she and her daughter
can have a life of their own, is uncon-
vincing.
It isn't until Veta sees a portrait of
Elwood and Harvey hanging over the
fireplace-where a portrait of her
mother used to be-that she becomes
believable in her part.
As for the supporting performers,
they have their moments. Unfor-
tunately, not enough of them.
Performing for the first time in the
Michigan Theatre, the actors have to
adjust themselves to playing in a larger
area for a potentially larger audience.
This may be one of the reasons why
Harvey, a very funny play with a lot of
potential, just didn't quite make it this
time around.

The University Club
Michigan Union

I t

U

I

2

Cgi 75 NMAPL E
769-1300
Mei - r $2 TO 600 PM

ROBERT
DE NIRO
ROBERT
DUVALL L1
UNITED ® IDI1
ARTISTS 3:2 . I:NI :T
1:15 3:20 5:30 7:40 9:50

By Gail Negbaur
MICKi GRANT'S Don't Bother Me,
I Can't Cope is a vibrant black
musical revue that is as varied in con-
tent as it is in quality. According to
Janice Reid, the director of the Great
Artist Series production, Cope presents
"the dilemmas of ghetto living, unem-
ployment, sexism, inflation and war
from a black, theatrical perspective."
This perspective includes a smat-
tering of gospel, blues, and standard
nusical coiedy pieces, as well as
modern, tap, jazz, and popular dance.
movements..
This is quite a lot to expect out of a
single 'play and one group of actors. To
facilitate coverage of the many dif-
ferent styles and moods, the company
is made up of eighteen people-all at
different levels of training in singing
and dancing. While it is exciting to see
this array of talent; there is a problem,
"of inconsistency in the production.
Cope, playing at the Power Center
through Sunday afternoon, has some
high points that make the production
well worth seeing. In the first act, Vera
Embree's choreography works
beautifully with the dancers and non-

dancers alike. Using simple but flashy
movements, her work makes it seem
that there is a professional dance com-
pany on stage.
The ''Time Brings About a Change"
sequence, with its repetitious music, is
made. interesting by virtue of the
choreography. In "History of Dance,"
dances as diverse as the Charleston, the
Swim, and the Latin Hustle are perfor-
med. The company sits in a circle while
each dancer takes a turn. This gives the
performers the added advantage of
having thp other actors nearby, en-
See 'COPE,' Page 13,

Bargain Hours - No $1 Tuesday
'Two hours of
non-stop thrills:
-Rex Reed.
OF THE
LOST ARKx
PARAMOUN

Somethinq's G appeninq
at the GIJ-{Club!
GDAN CE &f~m'dPARTY
with QD.J. Michael Kremman
GEvery'Guesday
{oaribbean
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Specials!,

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1:45
4:15
7:00
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DAILY WILLIAM HURT
1:15 ~KATHLEEN TURNER
3:20
5:30 BODY
7 40 Midnite
9:50 Fri. & Sat, IEfIT
CARBON COP

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DEPRESSEDFEMAL ES NEEDED,
for a research project at the Institute for Social Research.
Please use the following checklist to determine if you may
qualify for the project.

Y (PG!

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George Segal
Jack Warden
Susan St. James

DAILY
1:30-3 70-5-10
7:00-9:00
Midnite
Fri, & Sat.

the University Club
t's-here for y

II

(1) Loss of appetite
(2) Trouble sleeping
(3) Loss of energy
(4) Irritability

(5) Loss of interest
(6) Feelings of guilt
(7) Difficulty concentrating
(8) Crying spells

If you are experiencing some of these, symptoms and are interested in
participating in a social communication study as an assistant, please contact
DR. RITA COLEMAN or ELIZABETH LOPEZ (764-1173).
All information given will be held strictly confidential.
$36 compensation. No deception involved.

CI

A Non-profit Organization Since 1972!'

1



--- -- ------- '-- -- -
MIP.HI AN THF ATR

with

a New Term Beginning Nov.

2-

7 .

For more information visit
213 S. Main , Ann Arbor
or calli994-8400, after 1:O0pm.

DANCE
New and on-going classes in Dance Exercise
for Pregnant Women; Jazz; Ballet; Modern;
Afro; Blues; and Ballroom.
Taught by Noonie Hamp; Scott Read; Jesse
Richards; Debora Sipos; Whitley Setrakian;
Sue Schell-Clark; and Frances Zappella.

(most classes with
1 class for $30. 2

ETHNIC DANCE
Multi-Ethnic Dance. Learn dances from
India, the Balkans, Africa and the Middle
East. Taught by Malini Srirama, Jesse
Richards and Santha, with guest instructors.
Beledi (Danse Orientale). New and on-going
classes, Beginning through Advanced, with
Troupe Ta'amullat members Santha, Za'hra
and Nashira.
PHOTOGRAPHY
Cibachrome for Christmas; Matting and
Framing for Gifts; Photographic Christmas
Cards, Also classes tin photography and
darkroom technique taught by Bill Bloom,
Keary Campbell, Anders Goldfarb, Mike
Kvicala, Jim Morse and Raime Weber.

piano accompaniment.)
for $50 and 3 for $65.
* MIME
* Perry E. Perrault (cofounder and director of
the University of Michigan Mime Troupe)
* brings seven years of national and inter-

*

national experience to his class for beginning
students.

* MODELING
"Modeling for Photography" with Bill bloom.
A class for women interested in learning the

*

basic "low to's".

ART
* Stained Glass; Drawing the Human Face (with
* live model); Life Drawing; Batik; Basic
Drawing & Design; Charcoal Drawing/Oil
* Painting; and Watercolor.
Instruction by Sandy Marks; Richard Marks;
Cheryl Dawdy; Carol Shostak; Nels Nelson;

Darkroom

rental cards available at five

11

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