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October 23, 1981 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-23

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, October 23, 1981-Page 5

Daily Photo by MARK GINDIN
FRED WHIMS, STATE budget director of higher education, explains that as enrollment decreases, it will mean fur-
ther reductions in state appropriations.

State OKs Milliken budget cut;
U'funds axed by $4.6 million

Financial
outlook
bleak
for state
schools
(Continued from Page 1)
THE MAJOR issue will be the choice
between the quality or quantity of state
schools, Whims said. The first steps in
the process have already begun, he ad-
ded.
Institutions have been forced to ad-
dress budget priorities internally. Most
institutions, including the University,
have already begun the process of
retrenchment, he said.
THE NEXT step would be for the
state to say it cannot afford to support
all the state schools and make decisions
about where to place state education
priorities, Whims said.
The third and most drastic step would
be for the state to begin targeting in-
stitutions to be closed, Whims said.
Only if the state were in a hopeless
position would it consider eliminating
schools altogether, he said.
"Clearly, the level of support for
higher education has declined in real
terms," Clay said. Enrollment will un-
doubtedly drop and - state ap-
propriations could fall in proportion to
declining numbers of students, he said.
"WE CAN create an educational
system with fewer dollars," Whims
said. "Now, we're not just talking about
what is essential, but what is most
essential," he said.
Coupled with the reduction in the
overall size of the state budget,
declining enrollment spells an eventual
decrease in state appropriations to
state universities, Clay said.
The contemporay
Direction Ensemble
Presents a Concert of
Contemporary Works by:
BASSETT, COPLAND,
SCHWANTER & BERIO
October 24, 8 p.m.
Rackhm Auditorium
Admission Free
7:30 "Conert Prelude-
Pre-concert Discussion of Works
with SPECIAL GUEST, Pulitzer Prize
Winning Composer
Leslie Bassett

5

6:00 p.m. Homecoming Parade
(Catherine and Main)
7:15 Homecoming Pep Rally
(Union)
SATURDAY, OCT. 24
710:00 a. m: MUDBOWL
8:00 p.m. Bob James Concert
(Hill Auditorium)
8:30Up.m-. Homecoming Party
and Casino
(University Club)

MICHIGAN
THE CENTER OF THE WORLD-
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23rd
3:00 p.m. Evans Scholars'
Car Bash

:00 p.m. Count of Antipasto
Pizza Eating Contest

(Continued from Page 1)
The University had prepared the
1981-82 budget to anticipate all but
$750,000 of Milliken's order. Milliken's
executive order, which came only 22
days after the state's fiscal year began,
cuts aid to higher education by more
than $22 million.
AFTER THE vote in the ap-
propriations committee, Milliken told
reporters that he appreciated "the
committees' demonstrated willingness
to share in this difficult and unpopular
decision."
Other administrators were more op-
timistic in their outlook for the remain-
der of the state's fiscal year.
Budget Director Thomas Clay said he
Walesa
urges
restraint
WARSAW, Poland (AP) - Solidarity
Reader Lech Walesa urged restraint
esterday as union radicals considered
calling a nationwide walkout over food
shortages. More than 150,000 Polish
workers began a province wide general
strike hnd 2,000 drivers blared horns on
Warsaw s main freeway in defiance of
Communist authorities.
"Let's be reasonable and let's not
cross the borders of the line of
agreement,'' Walesa told Solidarity
leaders meeting in the Baltic port of
Fdansk to discuss a proposed one-hour
strike next Wednesday over food shor-
*tages. The government has warned it
might impose martial law unless the
strikes are halted.
A UNION spokesman said yesterday
night that regional union chiefs pressed
for a warning strike throughout the
day's stormy debate but no vote had
been taken.

believed it will not be necessary for the
governor to issue another executive or-
der this year.
FRED WHIMS, Budget Director
for Higher Education, said unless the
federal government drastically cuts its
funds to the state, the budget would not
have to go through apy major reduc-
tions this year.
Whims added that he did not foresee
any changes in the state's current
financial situation.
-Miller also said the amount of federal
funds flowing into the state would be a
large factor in deciding whether future
budget reductions would be necessary.
"THE DOMINANT factor is what's
going on in Washington," Miller said.
The degree of uncertainty concerning
the 1983 state budget is '"immense"
Miller said. "We don't even know
where the economy is going in 1982,"
Miller said.

FOR A DEPARTMENT in the state's
administration to say "I can't cut
another penny," is nonsense, Miller
said. We could find people who can still
take cuts, he added.
But Rep. Owen said he cannot under-
stand how the state's higher education
system can continue to hold up under
the threat of further budget reductions.
"I don't like to cut," Owen said.
"Becasue I have such a high percen-
tage of public jobs and students in my
constituency." But, Oven added, it
would have been grossly irresponsible
for him to vote against the executive
order.
All those who voted against the
executive order were Democrats.
Only once was the executive order in
jeopardy of not passing - when the
joint committee called for closed par-
tisan conferences to review the
executive order.

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Saturday, October 24

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