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October 11, 1981 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-11

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Page 2-Sunday, October 11, 1981-The Michigan Daily

West Point
won't see
Princeton
band- show

PRINCETON, N.J. (AP)- Princeton University's mar-
ching band has been banned from performing at the U.S.
Military Academy and urged to clean up its football game
halftime act, school officials say.
In recent years, the band has performed to the accom-
paniment of satire and sexual innuendoes in skits read by a
student announcer over stadium public address systems.
NEXT SATURDAY, Princeton's football team travels to,
play Army at West Point, N.Y., but officials there want no
part of the controversial commentary, an academy official
said.
Band president Michael Sanford said-the band's absence
from the Army game will mark the first time in 49 years the
group did not perform at a Princeton football game. .
Anger has been simmering throughout university circles
for at least a year, butthe band's performance two weeks
ago at the Delaware game "caused the pot to boil over,"
said Assistant Dean of Student Affairs Karen Tilbor.
THE PERFORMANCE, "A Long, Hard Look at Life With
Chemistry," spoofed the E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Co.'s

huge chemical industry in Delaware.
The show contained several plays on words such as
"organic" and "orgasm," which apparently offended many
spectators, especially some elderly Princeton alumni, said
Tilbor.
"Although there has been no official mandate to make us
change our band shows, the administration has made the
very strong suggestion, lots of verbal heat, that it would be
wise for us to change our ways," Sanford said.
Students were especially wary about the band's future
yesterday after Tilbor was quoted in the school paper as
saying, "There are several individuals who feel the band
could be replaced, but I certainly hope it won't come to
that."
"We will make an effort to clean up our act somewhat,
but I hope we won't be forced to take the fun and humor out
of our halftime shows," said Sanford, a senior.
The halftime skits are reviewed by a three-member panel
of administrators which includes Tilbor. She said that in the
future she would be more cautious in approving scripts
such as the one used during the Delaware game.

IN BRIEF

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Mon.-GREEK NIGHT. Fraternities & Sororities admitted
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Wed.-THE WHIZ KIDS.
LADIES FREE: Guys $1.00 before 9:30 p.m. 2 for 1 on
some drink specials.
Thurs.-PARTY NIGHT. Pitcher Specials. HUGE CROWDS!
Frit &tSat.-STAGE
HAPPY HOUR till 10 p.m. No cover before 9:00 p.m.
One-half cover between 9-9:30 p.m.

Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Thousands rally for peace
in West Germany
BONN, West Germany- More than 250,000 people gathered yesterday in
the biggest anti-war rally in recent memory and gave thunderous applause
to speakers urging Europe to free itself of nuclear weapons and prevent
Germany from becoming "a shooting gallery of the superpowers."
The crowd, which came to the West German capital by chartered train,
buses and river steamers, included soldiers in uniform, scores of parliamen-
tary deputies and leading figures from the nation's cultural and religious
life.
Guests at the rally included Coretta Scott King, widow of slain U.S. civil
rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and singer Harry Belafonte. Coret-
ta King told the crowd "millions of Americans stand by your side" and the
twp Americans joined in singing the civil rights hymn "We Shall Overcome"
at the close of the nearly 12-hour rally.
Absent was Chancellor Helmut Schmidt, who on Friday denounced the
demonstration as a "declaration of war" against the defense policies of his
government, including plans to station U.S. medium-range nuclear missiles
here.
One killed, 39 wounded
in IRA London attack
LONDON- The IRA struck less than a mile from Buckingham Palace
yesterday, detonating a booby-trapped laundry van by remote control and
sending six-inch nails and bolts scything into a bus carrying 23 Irish Guards
and their families.
Police said a woman passerby was killed and 22 guards and 17 other
people, including two children on the bus, were wounded in the blizzard of
nuts, bolts, flying metal and glass that turned Ebury Bridge Road outside
Chelsea Army Barracks into a blood-spattered battleground.
An official at Westminster Hospital said eight of the guards were un-
dergoing major surgery and one was on the critical list with a fractured skull
and another was likely to lose an eye.
The Irish Republican Publicity Bureau in Dublin said the attack-three-
quarters of a mile from Buckingham Palace-was aimed at the soldiers
because of a "state of war" existing between the British government and the
"oppressed Irish people."
Coast Guard to intercept
illegal Haitian refugees
MIAMI- A Coast Guard cutter sailed yesterday on the first patrol to in-
tercept Haitians fleeing their homeland, putting into effect a new policy of
turning back the illegal refugees before they reach U.S. shores.
The cutter Hamilton picked up supplies and fuel at the U.S. Naval Base at
Guantanamo, Cuba, before setting out, according to Lt. Neal Armstrong at
the Coast Guard's Miami office.
Coast Guard officials had revealed Friday that they would put into effect
over the weekend a new Reagan administration policy, cracking down on the
number of refugees who enter the United States by boat.
The Hamilton's crew is to intercept boats suspected of bringing illegal
aliens to Florida and turn them back.
Leaders of Miami's Haitian community have blasted the new policy, an-
nounced Sept. 29, as racist. They charge interdictioni intended to exclude
Haitian refugees because they are black.
An estimated 50,000 Haitians, fleeing their impoverished island home,
have landed on Florida shores since 1970.
GJbe 31rb1┬žan BOaiIy
Vol. XCII, No. 27
Saturday, October 10, 1981
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
scription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail
outside Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday
mornings. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7 by mail outside Ann
Arbor. Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street;
Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to United Press International,
Pacific News Service. Los Angeles Times Syndicate and Field Newspapers Syndicate.
News room: (313) 764.0552, 76-DAILY. Sports desk, 764-0562. Circulation, 764-Q558. Classified advertising

Daily Photo by PAUL ENGSTROM
M'procession: -
Another fall Saturday brought out the Michigan flags in Nickel's Arcade
yesterday. Ann Arbors fall colors depend more on the football team's fate
than how fast the trees are turning.
Women's rights leader
calls for 8-month fight

0
0

WASHINGTON (UPI) - The
president of the National Organization
for Women yesterday exhorted 2,000
women's rights activists to commit the
next eight months of their lives to
ratifying the Equal Rights Amendment
and ending "once and for all" the age-
old debate over equality.
In an impassioned and militant call to"
arms, delivered at NOW's 14th national
convention, Eleanor Smeal warned
failure to see the ERA become part of
the Constitution would be "an
American tragedy."
"Whatever it takes for equality,
we're going to give it without question,"
she pledged. "We're going to do it
because we're going to end this
discussion once and for all. In fact,
we're going to end this humiliation for

once and for all."
With the deadline for ratifying the
ERA set for next June 30, the NOW con-
vention served as a launching pad for a
last-ditch effort to win support from the
last three states needed to bring a nine-
year quest to a successful conclusion.
Thirty-five states already have ap-
proved the amendment.
Amid the hopes, there also was
pragmatism. Smeal conceded to her
dedicated followers, "We aren't
fools .. . The smart political money is
against us."
But with the aid of the most
sophisticated political techniques and a
war chest of "millions and millions of
dollars," she promised a fight to the
finish that at times will be waged in
"the very heartland of our opposition."

Reprt from the unde round
Wednesday October 14 -8: 0 p.m.
Room 126 Residential College, East Quad
THUNDER ON THE LEFT?:
An Open Discussion of Revolutionary Politics from
the 60's to the 80's
BERNADINE DOHRN-University of Chicago Law School,
currently teaching a course on Women and the Law at
a New Havaen Community College. Eleven years with
the Weather Underground and for a time on the FBI
most wanted list.
BILL AYERS-University of Michigan graduate, currently
working at a Day Care Center in New York City.
Was a School Board Candidate in Ann Arbor while
working with the Children's Community School.
Eleven years with the Weather Underground.
RICHIE FELDMAN-University of Michigan graduate currently
working at the Ford Truck Plant in Detroit. He works
with NOAR (National Organization for the American
Revolution) ind has been for some time close to the
work of Grace and James Boggs.
Sponsored by Residential College-Panel hosted by Susan Harding
Thursdav October 15, 8:00

764-0557. Display advertising. 764-0554. Billing 764s0550.
Editor in chief...................SARAANSPACH
Managing Editor ............... JULIE ENGEBRECHT
University Editor................LORENZO BENET
News Editor...................... DAVID MEYER
Opinion Page Editors..........CHARLES THOMSON
KEVIN TOTTIS
Sports Editor.................MARK MIHANOVIC
Associate" Sports Editors............ GREG DeGULIS
MARK FISCHER;
BUDDY MOOREHOUSE
DREW SHARP
Chief Photographer............PAUL ENGSTROM
PHOTOGRAPHERS- Jackie Bell, Kim Hill, Deborah
Lewis, Mike Lucas, Brian Mosck.
ARTISTS: Robert Lence, Jonathan Stewart, Richard
Walk, Norm Christiansen.
ARTS STAFF: Jane Carl, Mark Dighton, Adam Knee,
Pom Kramer, Gail Negbour, Howard Witt.
NEWS STAFF: John Adam, Beth Allen, Julie Barth,
Carol Chaltron, Andrew Chapman, Lisa Crumrine,
Debi Davis. Ann Marie Fazio, Pam Fickinger, Denise
Franklin, Joyce Frieden. Mark Gindin, Julie Hinds,
Steve Hook, Kathy Hoover, Mindy Layne, Jenaifer Mil-
ler, Dan Oberrotman, Janet Rae, David Spok, Fannie
Weinstein, Barry Witt.

SPORTS STAFF
SPORTS STAFF: Barb Barker, Randy Berger, Mark.
Borowdki, Joe Chapelle, Martha Crall, Jim Dwormnlan
John Fitzpatrick, Larry Freed, Chuck Hartwig, Chuck
Joffe, John Kere, Larry Mishkin, Dan Newman, Ron
Pollack, Jeff Quicksilver, Steve Schaumberger,
Sarah Sherber, James Thompson, Kent Walley; Chris
Wilson, Bob Wojnowski.
BUSINESS STAFF
Business Manager..............RANDI CIGELNIK
Sales Manager .................. BARB FORSLUND
Operations Manager.............SUSANNE KELLY
Display Manager...........MARY ANN MISIEWICZ
Classifieds Manager............. DENISE SULLIVAN
Finance Manager ..............MICHAEL YORICK
Assistant Disolav Manager........NANCY JOSLIN
Nationals Manager............ SUSAN RABUSHKA
Circulation Manager ..................KIM WOODS
Sales Coordinator............E. ANDREW PETERSEN
BUSINESS STAFF: Liz Altman, Hope Barron, Lindsay
Bray, Joe Broda. Alexander DePillis, Aida Eisenstadt,
Susan Epps, Wendy Fox, Sandy Frcka, Pamela Gould.
Kathryn Hendrick, Anthony Interrante. Indre Luitkus.
Beth Kovinsky, Barbara Miner, Caryn Natisse. Folice
Oper, Jodi Pollock, Michael Savitt, Michael
Seltzer, Karen Slverstein, Sam Slaughter, Adrienvf.
Strombi, Nancy Thompson, Jeffrey Voigt.

01

. I~~~~. ~~lMAILvnaVCn C-vrvN
No. Tickets Totol .
Wednesday, OCt. 21,8:00 pm
$3.00' (U. Bol., Rear & For Sides Main Floor)
$5.00 - (Front Bal., Front / Main Floor).
Thursday, Oct. 22, 8:00 pm .
$3.00 - (U. Bal., Reor & For Sides Main Floor).
$5.00 - (Front Dal.', Front % Main Floor)n
Friday, Oct. 23, 8:00 pm o
$4.00 - (U. Dal.. Rear & For Sides Main Floor) a
1|h n (n r n- f -l nt 'AA,'sinF r) 3

PUBLICATION SCHEDULE
1981
SM T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
SEPEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER OECEMBER
0,-a--6'12 3 f 34 5 G 7 1 2 3 45s
707i12 416 78970 8 $10112 13 14 6 8 9 1012
5617 18 19 11 73714 75 16717 15 17718 19 20 27 3 E16x5-
222324 25 26 18 2027 22 23 24 22 24 25 E- -
r 2 so25 6 2 28 29 30 3J
JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRI
SMTWTF S S M T W T F S S M T W T F. S S M T W T F S
I 1234 56 12 3 4 5 6 1231

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