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October 11, 1981 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

GM to
recall 1900
'workers if
sales jump

The Michigan Daily-Sunday, October 11, 1981-Page 3
Israeli, Egyptian ties may change

BALTIMORE (UPI) - General
Motors will recall 1,900 employees in
February if car sales pick up, a union
official said yesterday.
Patrick Coletta, a GM vice president
and general manager of the assembly
division from Detroit, confirmed a ten-
tative callback date announced two
weeks ago,-said Roaney Trump, an of-
ficial with Local 239 of the United Auto
Workers.

"BUT HE made it contingent on
sales," Trump said.
He added he is pessimistic the second
shift workers will be back on the job
early next year.
"I'm like the man from Missouri. I
won't believe anything until I see it," he
said. "I have to be this way, after
having been given three previous dates
for the return of the second shift - none
of which was met."

By The Associated Press
A former U.S. envoy with close con-
tacts to Hosni Mubarak says he expects
Egypt's president-designate to seek
reconciliation with Saudi Arabia and be
firmer in dealing with Israel than his
slain mentor, Anwar Sadat.
Hermann Eilts had almost daily con-
tacts with then-Vice President
Mubarak while serving as ambassador
to Cairo from 1973-1979.
MUBARAK WAS nominated by
parliament and is the sole candidate in
next Tuesday's elections to name a suc-
cessor to Sadat, who was slain by
assassins last Tuesday.
Eilts, now a professor of international
relations at Boston University, told The

Associated Press in a telephone inter-
view that Mubarak has taken care to
place loyalists in key positions and
seems to have "effective hold on the
levers of power in Egypt."
He described Mubarak, a 53-year-old
former air force chief, as "very much a
disciplined, military type."
Sadat's death has pumped new
energy into the struggle of Israeli set-
tlers in the Sinai desert to block the
final stage of Israel's withdrawal from
the territory.
Leaders of the anti-withdrawal
movement said after a strategy
meeting Friday that they would bring
new settlers into the northeastern cor-
ner of Sinai and step up their lobbying

among government and opposition
politicians to prevent the final with-
drawal.
The final third of the Sinai peninsula
is to be transferred to Egypt next April
in accordance with the Camp David
peace treaty.
About 3,000 Israelis live in a town and
a dozen settlements built in the nor-
theastern Sinai since Israel captured
the area in the 1967 Mideast War. The
majority are willing to accept financial
compensation and move out peacefully,
But a hard-core minority has vowed to
stay and campaign against the with-
drawal.

J T A P~PEXTTFXT(2Q Local firm

.1.111 IL' r11 IiN t..Jk
SUNDAY
HIGHLIGHT
The Center for Russian and East European Studies and the Judiac Studies
center continues its festival of Jewish culture. Today's events are a lecture
by Maurice Friedberg entitled "Yiddish Literature & Its Slavic Neighbors,"
at the United Hebrew Schools in Southfield. At 2:30 p.m. Joseph Buloff will
give a dramatic reading from Yiddish literature. Yiddish folk songs will be
performed by Abraham Brumberg and Bob Jacobs at the Jewish Com-
munity Center in West Bloomfield at 7 p.m. The film Image Before My Eyes
will be shown at 8p.m.
FILMS
Classic Film Theater-African Queen, 5,7 & 9 p.m., Michigan Theater.
Cinema II-The Stud Farm, 7 & 9 p.m., Aud. A, Angell Hall.
Cinema Guild-City Lights,^7 p.m.; A Woman of Paris, 9 p.m., Lorch Hall
Aud.
Alternative Action-Garden of the Finzi Continis, 7 & 9 p.m., MLB 3.
PERFORMANCES
Major Events-Don Fogelberg, 8 p.m., Crisler Arena.
School of Music-Piano Accompanying Recital, Naomi Oliphant, 2 p.m.,
University Musical Society-Mozart's " Don Giovanni," 3 pm., Power Cen-
ter.
Professional Theater Program-BloodKnot, 8 p.m., Lydia Mendelssohn
Theater.
WRIF-Benefit concert for PIRGIM, "The Falcons" and "The Blue Front
Persuaders," 9p.m., Rick's American Cafe, $2.
MEETINGS
Friends of the Matthaei Botanical Gardens-Pierre Dansereau,
"Ecological Management of Land," 2:30 p.m., Gardens' auditorium.
Human Sexuality Office-The Lavender Debutante, discussion of the gay
coming-out experience, 6 p.m., Guild House, 802 Monroe.
Graduate Women's Network-Potluck brunch meeting, for all graduate
women, noon, Guild House, 802 Monroe.
Meekrah-Sukkah Bldg., Markley Courtyard, 1p.m.
Hillel-Sukkah Bldg., 4 p.m.
MISCELLANEOUS
Artists & Craftsmen Guild-Fall Exhibition, Briarwood Mall.
Jewish Grad Students-Apple Picking Trip, carpool from Hillel at 10:30
a.m.; bring sack lunch.
Hillel-Del Dinner 6p.m.
Hillel-Israel dancing, 7-0 p.m.
Recreation-Family Sunday Funday, Bike Rodeo, 2-5 p.m., NCRB.
MONDAY
HIGHLIGHT
"Coping with Office Stress" is the topic for a workshop from 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Monday sponsored by the Center for Continuing Education for Women. The
workshop will be held in the West Conference Room, Rackham.
FILMS
AAFC-Mingus, 7 p.m.; Wizard of Waukesha: A film About Les Paul, 8:45
p.m., Aud. A, Angell Hall.
CRT-Little Big Man, 4,7 & 9:30 p.m., Michigan Theater.
Cinema Guild-The Cruel Sea, 8p.m., Lorch Hall Aud.
Cinema I-Black Girl, 8:15 p.m., Nat. Sci.
SPEAKERS
Collegiate Institute for Values and Science-Edward Gramlich, "What is
Benefit-Cost Analysis?: A Case Study," 4 p.m., MLB, Lec. Rm. 2.
Ethics & Religion-Patrick Murray, "Creation and Evolution-And
Faith," 7:30p.m., Ecumenical Campus Center, 921 Church St.
MEETINGS
Women's Network-First anniversary of Women's Network, Open to
University women, noon-1:30 p.m., Michigan League, Rms. 4 & 5.
Recycle Ann Arbor-Annual meeting, with potluck to follow, 6:15 p.m.,
Xanadu Co-op, 1811 Washtenaw.
College Republicans-First meeting of the year, 7:30 p.m., Henderson
Room, Michigan Union.
MISCELLANEOUS
Guild House-Poetry reading, Nadean Bishop and Lorene Erickson, 8
p.m., 802 Monroe.
Hillel-Sukkot Services, 6:30 p.m., 1429 Hill St.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of:
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI., 48109.

t-
RELIGIOUS DIMENSIONS
OF CONTEMPORARY CONCERNS:
A SERIES OF LECTURE-DISCUSSIONS
Continuing the Monday Night series of lectures where sub-
jects of current major interest are discussed at The Ecu-
menical Campus Center, 921 Church Street. Everyone is
welcome to these discussions. Beginning at 7:30 p.m.,
with refreshments, the speaker or speakers will make their
presentation and engage in discussion until 9:00 P.M.
COME JOIN US I MONDAY OCTOBER w1 2th -
Speaker: Dr. Patrick Murray

ma print
Shroud
book
DETROIT (UPI) - A Michigan
publishing firm has received approval
from a federal judge to go ahead with
distribution this week of a book on the
Shroud of Turin.
In a ruling Friday, U.S. District
Judge Horace Gilmore removed a
restraining order issued the day before
by a Washtenaw County Judge preven-
ting publication of the book "Verdict of
the Shroud."
GILMORE SAID halting publication
of the book would violate the First
Amendment.
The ruling came in a lawsuit filed
against Servant Publications of Ann
Arbor by the Shroud of Turin Research
Project, a group of 40 scientists that has
spent several years studying the cloth
and held a symposium in Connecticut
last week.
The group contends its study shows
that the image of a crucified body on
the mysterious cloth is that of a man,
but that tests have been unable either to
prove or disprove conclusively the 14-
foot long linen is the first century burial
cloth of Jesus.
The book is written by Ken Steven-
son, a press aide to the research team,
and Larry Habermas, a philosophy
teacher at Liberty Baptist College in
Lynchburg, Va.
It claims the image on the shroud was
made by the body of Christ.
The scientists filed suit saying they
did not want the book to falsely imply it
was associated with their project.

"I

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