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October 09, 1981 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-09

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Page 8-Friday, October 9, 1981-The Michigan Doily

V
V
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HEBREW UNION COLLEGE-JEWISH INSTITUTE OF RELIGION
Cincinnati . New York . Los Angeles . Jerusalem
OFFERS PROGRAMS IN HIGHER JEWISH EDUCATION
Leading Toj
Careers in the Jewish Community
Rabbinic
Education
Jewish Communal Service
Cantorial

A representative will be on campus at Hillel on Fri.,

Oct . 23

to meet with interested individuals.
appointments.

Call 663-3336 for

Crisler
looims
By Howard Witt
T WAS a rainy spring night
in 1979 when Ann Arbor last got
a glimpse of Dan Fogelberg. And
what a magical glimpse it was:
Fogelberg, alone with his piano and his
guitar, on an otherwise barren stage in
the acoustical Elysium of Hill Audi-
torium.
He had been ill with a bad cold and
was visibly wrung out even before.he
struck his first chord; many in the
audience had final exams the next day
and were visibly preoccupied.
But then Dan Fogelberg began to
sing. And as mawkish as this might
sound, suddenly nothing else mattered.
He sang of lost loves and missed con-
nections and misunderstandings-the
stuff of human melancholy he captures
so well in his music. And there were
many moist eyes when he finished some
new song no one had ever heard before:
"Same Old Lang Syne."
On Sunday night, Ann Arbor will
again get a glimpse of Dan Fogelberg.
And he will undoubtedly repeat "Same
Old Lang Syne," now that it has finally
been released on his newest album, The
Innocent Age, and has become a hit.
But there is cause for great concern
this time around. The lyrical artistry of
this most beautiful of songs will not
caress the intimate walls of Hill
Auditorium; it will instead bounce back
and forth off the cold concrete of Crisler
Arena. And Dan Fogelberg will not be
life-size and alone on a gentle hardwood
stage; he will be a tiny dot amid amps
and speakers and drums and syn-
thesizers on a yawning expanse of tem-
porary platforms.
This is going to be a vastly different
Dan Fogelberg concert. One hopes it
will not be a disaster.
The Innocent Age points up in
vivid detail just how Dan Fogelberg
works best and how he fails worst, and
the album therefore presages what is
likely to go especially wrong at Crisler
Arena on October 11.

I I

..........

E XP L01R
THE MANY AVENUES
OF THE FUTURE

E

I

Campus Interviews-Wednesday, October 14, 1981
Tennessee Gas Transmission, a leading interstate gas pipeline system, will be
interviewing on your campus very soon. We are seeking ambitious new
graduates who are looking for high-growth opportunities and who are
interested in pursuing a career as a Computer Programmer/Systems
Analyst. Your degree should be in:
COMPUTER SCIENCE ~
MATHEMATICS
PHYSICS
Check with your placement office to schedule interviews with our
representatives for the date(s) listed above.

Quite simply, Fogelberg excels at
songs about human emotion. He writes
best about what's closest to him, and
indeed, his earlier albums (Souvenirs,
Captured Angel, Netherlands) greatly
concern his own relationships and
feelings. But we don't mind-what
might come off as conceited, gushing
dreck from some other artist is
genuinely communicated emotion when,
Fogelberg does it.
A song, for instance, like "Leader of
the Band," an ode of thanks and ap-
preciation .to Fogelberg's father, ex-
presses beautifully that ineffable love
any person feels upon first truly
realizing the tremendous debt owed to a
parent.
Fogelberg's touching combination of
achingly poetic lyrics and euphonious,
almost ballad-like music is always
agreeable-and often haunting.
The title track of The Innocent Age
precisely embodies this spellbinding
style. The song is
economic-Fogelberg's voice is the
principal instrument. It summons sad-
ness, hesitance, and worry, yet.at the
same time remains hopeful. And it
sticks in your mind endlessly.
Or "Nexus," "The Lion's Share,"
"Hard to Say," and of course, "Same
Old Lang Syne"-all feature.
meaningful lyrics and Fogelberg's
smooth voice as the ascendant in-
strument. Intimate songs like these
hearken back to the old, true Dan
Fogelberg of "Dancing Shoes" days.
But then there are the songs that fail
miserably, like "Lost in the Sun" or
"Times. Like These." Both surrender
crafted lyrics to the insipid, and simple,
moving music to the cacophonous.
These cuts seem almost gratuitous-as
if Fogelberg included them because he
had a lot of musicians and a lot of fancy
equipment around and felt he ought to
use them.

What they are is noise. In "Lost in the
Sun," Fogelberg's voice loses out .to
screeching guitars. Worse, the song'is
about sorrow and loneliness-themes
that don't adapt too well to a disconcer-
ting rock form.
"Times Like These" is even more
disappointing because its message is
totally unintelligible. It is so obscure as
to be meaningless, and does not do
justice to Fogelberg the (usually)
artful lyricist.
All this is not to say that Dan
Fogelberg must never come near rock.
He has done so successfully on Phoenix,
with "Face the Fire." There he com-
bined political statement with vigorous*
instrumentation and produced ,an
eminently listenable song.
We may well hear "Face the Fire",
during Fogelberg's Crisler concert. But
with a band of six and all their assorted
equipment that he is bringing with him,
we will probably also hear "Lost in the
Sun," which will be especially un-
bearable as its discord echo'es and
redoubles through the cavernous
basketball arena.
And "The Innocent Age," which
might have sounded so ethereal in fill
Auditorium, will inevitably be corrup-
ted-and lost in the 13,000 seats .of
Crisler Arena.

U

TENCO

Tennessee GasTransmission
A Tenneco Company
P.O. Box 2511, Houston, Texas 77001
We Are An Equal Opportunity Employer

I N

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