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October 09, 1981 - Image 9

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-09

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The Michigan Daily-Friday, October 9, 1981-Page 9
'U' astronomers
focus in on space

(Continued from Page 1)
in X-ray research and agreed to move
the University's McGraw-Hill Obser-
vatory to Kitt Peak in an effort to.
escape the inhibiting Michigan
weather.
"The agreement has worked ex-
tremely well," Hiltner said. The
University gets 50 percent of the
viewing time, with the other two
colleges receiving 20 percent of the
time each, with 10 percent left over for
the "rough edges," he said.
"MCGRAW-HILL is used extensively
by graduate students at the Univer-
sity," Hiltner said. "Nearly everyone
who will get a Ph.D. has used the ob-
servatory." An endowment fund is used
to pay the student's travel and other
expenses, he added.
Professor McAlpine said that he often
brings graduate students to Chile to use
the Curtis-Schmidt telescope.
Although owned by the University,
the Cerro Tololo telescope is operated
by the Association of Universities for
Research in Astronomy, whose direc-
tors include Hiltner and James
Brinkerhoff, University vice-
president and chief financial officer.
"THE CORNERSTONE of research
in this department is having our own
telescope," said Eliot Malumuth, a doc-
toral candidate in the astronomy depar-
tment who has been to both telescopes.

"It's definitely worth the trip," he ad-
ded.
Stephen Schectman, of the Mt. Wilson
Observatory in California, invented a
photon scanner while doing post-
doctoral work at Michigan. The scan-
ner has since been adapted by many
observatories because it can detect and
count light particles on the level of its
smallest particle, the photon.
The University has one of a dozen
comparable astronomy departments in
the nation, Schectman said.

-co -
'S THERE
- ALWAY
~ -L
MR, FLOOD'S PART'
120 WEST LIBERTY, ANN ARBOR &; lcvmd

Discouraged runaway AP Ph
This photo of Bryan Anderson, 15, from Bath, Michigan was taken just
before his disappearance late in August of this year. Bryan, who had tried to
find a foster home for the last four years, apparently gave up the search and
took to the road instead. He has not been seen or heard from since August,
and there is no clue as to his whereabouts.

Diag preachers give the word

(Continued from Page 1) the central. There is a real spiritual
"Sometimes they're a hindrance but hunger and awakening."
'm sure that sometimes they also help "Most people," Fite says, "have
draw a crowd." never heard the true word of Jesus
"All through Jesus' life there were Christ. All they've heard is religious
lways mockers and those who op- bunk."
0 ' rosed,' says Fite, who could easily be But Fite was quick to emphasize he
I'stereotyped as a typical college preppie wasn't putting down other
with his crew neck sweaters and button denominations. "We recognize the
'down shirts. other Christian groups on campus.
Allen, who heckled preachers at the We're not an exclusive group. We don't
University of California at Berkeley, have a corner on the truth. Our goal as
says he doesn't hate Caulk and Fite, he a ministry is to reach the college cam-
"ust likes to argue with them. pus and raise up young college leaders.
"I'VE HAD PEOPLE walk up to me I believe there's hundreds of people
And say they were going to bash in my prepared to receive the message God
"bains if I didn't stop heckling these has for them."
Jesus freaks," he said. "In the past two STUDENTS walking through the
or three weeks I've gotten quite a Diag said they have no objection to the
* jeputation. I'll be walking down the preaching. Some stop and start to
street and be recognized in a second," argue, otherslistening raise their hands
he adds pridefully. while waiting to be called on by Fite or
But Wade, wearing a Michigan Caulk. Some don't notice the preaching
sweatshirt, says the Diag should be a at all.
place for students to study and isn't an "I think they have as much right as
appropriate place for ministers to, anyone else to give their opinion,"
jreach. 'Freshman Beth Steinberg said. "It is
"I like Hunter and Mike but I don't also important for people to react to
think they should try and impose their them but it's not their right to make fun
beliefs on others," he said. "I'm op- of them."
u posed to religion. I think Christianity
has done much to harm around the
world. I've seen the Belgians in Zaire -
and the French in the Congo. I've seen
Christianity in the ghettos and it divides IN
and conquers people. It is racist."
WADE TURNS back to Caulk's ser- Ann Arbor's fastest!
mon. From 10-800 T-shirts screenprint-
"Jesus came to reconcile all of you ed within 24 hours of order.
with God," Caulk says. Multi-color printing our specialty.
"Which Jesus," Allen says,'his voice You supply art or use our expert
cracking. design staff.
"Yeah," says Wade, "We've been Hundreds of surplus T-shirts only
,waiting for him and he hasn't come $2. each. Located beh nd the Blnd Pig Cate
yet." 208 s First St Phone 994-1367
While pacing above on the stone ben- N r'
ches, Fite and Caulk can be bold and in-
timidating. Off the bench, they speak
calmly and act more reserved.
"THERE IS A trend across the coun-
try," Caulk says. "Students are star- ANN AR X
t4n y
t4igt unaa rmtemtra n
44
ttl

Some say listening between classes
makes the day pass a little easier.
Others watch for the entertainment
value. Freshman Bob Culver said, "It's
almost like a show. The information
that Mike is conveying is not that dif-
ferent than what might be in a church
but it's the atmosphere. It's like a car-
nival; a circus."
Freshman Betsy Maurer listened at-
tentively as Caulk spoke. She became
involved in the ministry when it first
arrived in Ann Arbor and plans to work
with Caulk and Fite. "There's a lot of
work to be done here on campus. There
are a lot of unhappy people here who
are slaves to sin. God gave us Jesus
Christ to give us life."

CREA1iONISM AND EVOLUI0N-The Real Issues
MONDAY 7:30 pm: Ecumenical Campus Center, 921 Church Street - Speaker
TUESDAY 9:30 a.m.: Discussion with the Speaker- Michigan Union (1st fir)
(Coffee and Doughnuts will be provided)
N. PATRICK MURRAY, B.A., Baylor in History; M. Div., Southern Baptist
Theological Seminary: Ph.D., Duke University
Pat Murray was an Assistant Coordinator of Religious Affairs at
the Univ. of Michigan 1962-1966, and was Professor of Philosophy
at the University of Central Arkansas 1966-1976. He was ordained
an Episcopal Priest in 1978 and is currently Rector of All Sanits'
Episcopal Church, Russelville, Ark. Together with Neal Buffaloe,
Professor of Biology, he has written a booklet with the above title
to assist in the discussion of the issue in Ark.
THIS ISSUE IS A POTENTIALLY EXPLOSIVE ONE THAT CARRIES GRAVE IM-
PLICATIONS FOR EDUCATION AND RELIGION IN THE UNITED STATES. IT IS
THEREFORE A MATTER OF URGENCY THAT THE ELEMENTS IN THIS CONTRO-
VERSY BE IDENTIFIED AND CLARIFIED AS FULLY AS POSSIBLE.
For further information contact: Ethics and Religion 764-4442 or ECC 662-5529

r

I W P~' ~ I

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