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October 09, 1981 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-09

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Y

ARTS

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The Michigan Dailyd

Friday, October 9, 1981

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B_-Carol Poneman
WyALKING INTO the
exhibit at the Alice S
Gallery at 301 N. Main
is lie walking into a ma
geometrical world. Currently on e
there are several works of mode
tists Josef Albers, Norman Ive
Sewell Sillman. The world of thei
not easy to enter, but once inside
be a world of marvelous moveme
color.
Looking at the selections of A
work included in this exhibi
repetition of themes is immed
striking and is indicative of the w
lis life's work. Throughout hi
cdeir, which stretched until his
idt1976, Albers repeated the
geometric .patterns, varying the
in theme and color.

agical geometrical
In his "Homage to the Square" geometry, yet Ives' art relies less on
series, four paintings of which are on the phenomenon of optical illusion. In
exhibit at the gallery, Albers painted various media, such as print, collage,
latest three squares, inside one and sculpture, Ives repeats hiscentral
3imsar another-each is progressively smaller notif-the letter. Ives paints his letters
Street and varies only slightly in color. in typewriter type-face, all one size and
agieal One stares at these textureless of the same coloration. Then he lines
exhibit geometric patterns, wondering why the them across the paper in continuous
ern ar- artist bothered to paint nested squares rows, the letters right side up, upside
s, and against a blank plane. Then, gradually, down, and sideways, barely discernable
r art is the shapes lose their static nature; they as characters.
it can begin to recede and come forward. Some selections, such as "Monde
nt and Albers' magic, that of optical illusion, is Charmante" are mixed media and thus
beginning to work. retain some textural interest; other
Albers' Albers has been quoted as having works are less successful. Ives' relief
t, the said, "in science one and one is always sculpture entitled "Black Wood Bas
diately two, in art it can also be three or more." Relief" is satisfying only in its neatness
'hole of Albers' art is an art of uncertainty-he and technical virtuosity.
s long was interested in creating an art of Again, Ives has his type-face letters
death perpetual movement, with colors marching across the surface. Only this
same especially mobile. time they are carved wood, painted
m only Born in 1888 on Boltrop, Westphalia black; the texture of the wood is rough.
(now a part of West Germany), Albers It is visually uninteresting. Unfor-
made his name artistically while af- tunately this is tgle case for much of
filiated with the Bauhaus School of pre- Ives' work represented in this exhibit.
World War II Germany. Helived most ,Sewell Sillman provides an in-
of his life in the United States, teaching teresting contrast to both Ives and
at various American universities. In Albers-although his themes are no
1971, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in more original, his work has a grace and
New York featured a major 200-work subtlety that is lacking in the art of his
retrospective of Albers' career. two contemporaries.
Norman Ives shares Albers' Sillman has only three designs in this

"

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58

Cap:
From now on we can only meet in happy places: The Apple Festival in
Plymouth's "Old Village" section (Starkweather and Mill Sts.) will have Clowns,
Bluegrass Music, Minstrels, Food, Arts, Crafts, Antiques, Flea Market, Me-
chanical Bull, Pony Rides, Moonwalk, Balloons, Animals from Bunnies to
Llamas and More!
Now, That's Happy, Cap! I'll hang around the Gypsy Fortune Teller all
day Saturday, Oct. 10 (Rain Date Oct. 17).
If you love fun and if you love ME, I'll see you there!
Diane

MANN THEATRES
VILLAGE 4
375 N. MAPLE
769-1300

w17

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Robert DeNiro - Robert Duvall

MATINEES
DAILY
BARGAIN HOURS

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"A gorgeous film of glowing "Absorbing, moving, deeply felt.
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-Gene Shalit, NBC-TV "Today Show" battle sequences rank with
"Could well be the movie of the those in Kubrick's 'Paths of
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the Lost Ark' Exciting, involving
and splendidly acted." "Sweeping. Uncommon beauty,
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It is beautifully made and -Janet Maslin, New York Times

They have brought to life some of the most
memorable characters in motion picture history.
DeNiro as the obsessed Travis Bickle in
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Duvall as the hypnotic Bull Meachum in
"The Great Santini"and the napalm-loving
Colonel Kilgore in"Apocalypse Now.
Now they are together in"True Confessions'
The story of two brothers, a priest and a cop.
"Of the law of God and the law of the streets.
Of the pressures that bring men together

should be waltzing with Oscar
next spring. -Liz Smith, Syndicated Columni

"The best picture of the year.

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"Ambitious. Sweeping. A singu-
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A milestone in the career of the next to another World War I
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-Edwin Miller, Seventeen

"True Confessions"also unites the talents of
director Ulu Grosbard, writers
John Gregory Dunne and Joan Didion,
and producers Irwin Winkler

DAILY
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'and

Robert Chartoff.

Together they have created one of the most
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R&B[AI I WOiNAPEW~f~IMi I M HiW HRgI1E MUARI3tt' [~cfw FRANCIP I N 'RRF v fAVIB W11I I 1M2

A ROBERT CHARTOFF-IRWIN WINKLER PRODUCTION

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