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October 08, 1981 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-08

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6

Page 2-Thursday, October 8, 1981-The Michigan Daily
TV may cause bad health habits

BOSTON (AP)- Television's image of the brawny
hero who tosses back liquor, grabs quick snacks and
never gets fat or sick may cause poor health attitudes
in TV addicts, a study concludes.
The researchers say people who watch television
many hours a day are likely to adopt the nonchalant;
careless outlook of the characters who populate
prime-time TV.
"The more people watch television, the more com-
placent they are about health and exercise and the
more confidence they have in the medical
profession," said George Gerbner, one of the resear-
chers.
"THERE IS AN unrealistic belief in the magic
powers of medicine. They say, 'If anything goes
wrong, the doctor will take care of it.' "
The researchers said people probably get more
health information from TV dramas than anywhere
else.
"The cultivation of complacency, coupled with an
unrealistic belief in the 'magic of medicine,' is likely
to perpetuate unhealthy lifestyles and to leave both
patients and health professionals vulnerable to
disappointment, frustration and litigation," they
wrote.
THE STUDY WAS conducted at the Annenberg

There is an unrealistic belief in
the magic powers of medicine.
They say 'If anything goes wrong,
the doctor will take care of it.'"
-George Gerbner,
University of Pennsylvania
School of Communications at the University of Pen-
nsylvania, where researchers watched a week of
prime-time and weekend programs and conducted
surveys of viewers.
Their results, published in today's New England
Journal of Medicine, show: "Prime-time characters
are not only healthy, though often vulnerable to in-
flicted injury, but despite all the mayhem, eating and
drinking are also relatively sober, safe from acciden-
ts and slim at all ages."
The researchers found that TV characters eat,
drink or talk about food eight times an hour. They
grab a fast snack almost as often as they eat break-
fast, lunch and dinner combined.

DESPITE THESE poor eating habits, less than 6
percent of the male TV characters and 2 percent of
the female characters were overweight.
The most common beverage on the tube is alcohol.
Thirty-six percent of the characters drink, but only
about 1 percent are alcoholics.
Most people on TV shows use cars, but in the week
of study, only one character wore a seatbelt.
CRIME IS 10 times more frequent on television
than in the real world, and there are five acts of
violence per hour during prime time. Yet pain, suf-
fering or medical help rarely follow this mayhem.
The typical television viewer sees about 12 doctors
during prime time alone. And they are protrayed as
being good, successful and peaceful.
"The work of the television doctor is one of per-
sonal and almost mystical power over not only the
physical but also the emotional and social life of the
patient," they wrote.
"These little things add up to a lifetime pattern of
ritualistic indoctrination," said Gerbner, noting that
the average family watches 6 hours of television a
day. "Most of the story telling about what life is all
about, what assumptions we make about the outside
world, what we believe about conduct, are primarily
and most pervasively carried by television."

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New treatment may
help leukemia victims

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press international reports
Reagan to veto
appropriations bill
WASHINGTON- President Reagan's aides sent an unmistakable signal
to Congress yesterday that he intends to veto an $87.4 billion, House-passed
appropriations bill, and Speaker Thomas O'Neill conceded Republicans
have the votes to make the veto stick.
"This appears to be the kind of bill he was talking about" when he
threatened last week to veto budget-busting legislation, White House
spokesman Larry Speakes told reporters. He said the spending measure, for
the departments of Labor, Education, and Health and Human Services, is $4
billion over the limits Congress set earlier this year.
Reagan has yet to veto his first bill.
The White House issued the threat as the GOP chairman of the Senate Ap-
propriations Committee said it was impossible to grant Reagan's request for
a 12 percent across-the-board cut in non-defense domestic programs for 1982.
Sen. Mark Hatfield (R-Ore.) also said there was growing support among
Republicans to double Reagan's proposed $2 billion reduction in the defense
budget.
Senate approves bill banning
use of state funds for abortions
LANSING- The Senate approved by a comfortable nargin yesterday a
bill banning use of state funds for most welfare abortions, repeating a
procedure and arguments that have become almost a Capitol tradition.
The bill passed 26-11 and was-returned to the House for final action. It will
then be shipped to Gov. William G. Milliken who is almost certain to veto it,
setting up another legislative effort to overturn his position.
Backers of the abortion ban said they are optimistic they will have the
needed two-thirds vote in the House and Senate to override a certain Milliken
veto.
Milliken and the Legislature have clashed over welfare abortions-a
procedure the governor believes poor women have a right to choose-10 times
in the last three years.
Ford to offer 'up front money'
DETROIT- Ford Motor Co., faced with declining showroom traffic,
decided yesterday to match the price-discounting programs now being of-
fered by its competitors.
,Ford said it will give cash rebates between $400 and $700 to buyers of three
small car lines through Nov. 22. Dealers must contribute a portion of the
payment.
Ford did not describe the promotion as a rebate. Instead, it said it was of-
fering "up front money" to reduce the size of the customer's monthly
payment.
Young gains spot in
Atlanta mayoral runoff
ATLANTA- Former U.N. Ambassador Andrew Young and State Rep.
Sidney Marcus headed yesterday for a mayoral runoff that may be decided
by their race, despite their reluctance to raise racial issues during the initial
campaign.
Voting in Tuesday's non-partisan election was split along racial lines, with
Young, who is black, capturing 62 percent of the black vote and Marcus, who
is white, taking 80 percent of the white vote.
They emerged as the leading candidates in a field of seven. Since no can-
didate collected a majority of the total vote, a runoff was scheduled for Oct.
27.
Marcus, jubilant at finishing only 2 percentage points behind Young,
challenged his opponent to a televised debate and Young accepted.
Marcus, 53, has promoted himself as a hard-working Georgia legislator.
who can win funds for Atlanta as the federal government delegates more
responsibilities to the states.

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BOSTON UPI - Children suffering.
from a relapse of leukemia have a bet-
ter chance of recovering from the
disease if they receive bone marow
transplants immediately rather than as
a last resort, doctors reported yester-
day.
The transplants, intravenous doses of
liquified bone marrow from a brother
or sister, are performed on leukemia
victims age 1 to 17 who had gone
through a remission, suffered a relapse
and were in remission for a second
time.
The overall cure rate-the number of

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children who are still free of the disease
after 10 years without chemotherapy -
is 40 to 50 percent, according to Dr.
Nicholas Dainiak, a hematologist at St.
Elizabeth's Hospital in Boston.
WHEN TREATING young patients
recovering from a relapse, doctors
traditionally waited until
chemotherapy failed and the patient's
condition had deteriorated before
trying marrow transplants as a last
resort. These patients generally have
had a low survival rate.
The Seattle researchers, however,
gave marrow transplants to 24 children
at the onset of a remissionbrought on by
chemotherapy. Twenty-one others
received chemotherapy alone.
Nine of the 24 patients treated by
marrow transplantation remained in
remission 17 to 55 months after the
procedure, the study said. Six of those
have been in remission for more than
two years.
IN CONTRAST, only one of the 21
patients treated with conventional
chemotherapy is in remission after 20
months, but requires outpatient
chemotherapy every two weeks.
"This study demonstrates that
marrow transplantation currently of-
fers the best chance of long-term
remission and potential-cure after a
child with acute lymphoblastic
leukemia has had a relapse in the.
marrow,"said the researchers.

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'15

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4

Vol. XCII, No. 25
Thursday, October 8, 1981

The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
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News room: (313) 764.0552, 76-DAILY, Sports desk, 764-0562, Circulation. 764-0558. Classified advertising

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Editor in chief.................... SARA ANSPACH
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CHARLES THOMSON
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MARK FISCHER
BUODQY MOOREHOUSE
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Chief Photographer.............PAUL ENGSTROM
ARTISTS: Robert Lence. Norm Christionsen, Jonathon
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PUBLICATION SCHEDULE
1981
SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMltBER
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
.0 a...4- 1 2 3 1 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5
10 11 12 4 6 7 8 9 10 8 10 11 12 13 14 6 8 9 10 11 12
131 15 16 17 18 19 111 13 1415 16 17 151 1718 19 20 21
20 22 23 24 2526 18 2021 22 23 24 22 24 25 26-9 -?
27 29 30 256 27 28 29 30 31Q
1982
JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL
S M T-W T F S S M T W T F S SM T W T F S S M T W T F S

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