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October 08, 1981 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Area groups to sponsor
national security forum

The Michigan Daily-Thursday, October 8, 1981 -Page 3

By BETH ALLEN
University professors, defense depar-
tment official's, and area citizens
representing diverse sides of national
defense issues will take part in a two-
day forum dealing with American
foreign policy and the military.
Sponsored by LSA Student Gover-
nment, the Michigan Student Assem-
bly, and a number of Ann Arbor area
citizens, the forum kicks off tonight at 8
p.m. in Rackham Lecture Hall with the
*keynote address by Rear Admiral
Eugene Carroll, deputy director of the
Center for Defense Information.
THE CENTER for Defense Infor-
mation is a private organization
primarily made up of ex-Pentagon per-
sonnel who devote their time to resear-
ching and analyzing current military
problems, expenditures, and
strategies.
Carroll formerly served under
Secretary of State Alexander Haig and
was director of U.S. military forces in
Europe and the Middle East.
The keynote address will be followed
by five panel discussions tomorrow.
The public will be invited to participate

in question and answer sessions.
THE STUDENT government mem-
bers who organized the forum tried to
select speakers who would represent
opposing viewpoints within the panels,
LSA-SG member Jamie Moeller said.
"Forums of this type are usually one
side or the other," Moeller said.
A panel discussion on the economics
behind American military and energy
policies will be held at 9 a.m. tomotrow.
Robert DeGrasse of the Council of
Economic Priorities, a non-profit group
that analyzes defense spending; David
Denoon, U.S. Deputy Assistant
Secretary of Defense; and Marc Ross, a
university physics professor
specializing in industrial energy ef-
ficiency will host this discussion.
AT 11:30 A.M. the second session en-
titled "World Politics and Interven-
tion". will feature Gretchen Eick, a
missionary.and activist specializing in
Central American problems; Allen
Whiting, a University political science
progessor specializing in Russia and
China and David Wurfel, a political
science professor from the University
of Windsor specializing in Vietnam and
Southeast Asia.

Brent Scoecroft, National Security
Advisor to President Ford, and Univer-
sity political science Prof. J. David
Singer, an expert on the nuclear arms
race, will discuss "Defense and the
Arms race" in a session beginning at 2
p.m.
"Morality or Rationality of Nuclear
Weapons" at 4:30 p.m. will be handled
by Alvin Saperstein, a physics
professor from Wayne State Univer-
sity; Rev. Peter Shidemantle, Chair-
man of the Swords into Plowshares
Task Force of the Cleveland
Presbytery; and Joe Volk, Michigan
Coordinator for the American Friends
Service Committee.
At 8 p.m., the final session of the day
will be a discussion of U.S. policy in the
Middle East with input from Middle
East expert Jerrold Green of the
University's political science depar-
tment; K. Allin Luther, a professor of
Near Eastern studies; and Richard
Mitchell, a university professor of Near
Eastern and North African History.

The Great Pumpkin
A pumpkin patch on a farm on N. Territorial outside Ann Arbor is in full
bloom as a reminder of the Halloween season.

__________________________________________________ 4

-HAPPENINGS-
HIGHLIGHT
A two day forum on American foreign policy and the military begins
tonight at the Rackham Lecture Hall at 8 p.m. "What Is National Security?"
features a keynote address by retired Rear Admiral Eugene Carroll of the
Center for Defense Information. Also, the Spartacus Youth League is
organizing a picket line outside the forum beginning at 7:30 p.m. The demon-
stration is being former around two demands: to drive the Defense In-
telligency Agency off campus and to protest President Reagan's policies
toward the Soviet Union.
FILMS
Classic Film Theatre-One Flew Over the Cookoo's Nest, Michigan
Theater, 3 and 7 p.m. Also Carnal Knowledge, 5:15 and 9:15 p.m.
Mediatrics-The Sting, Nat. Sci., 7 & 9:30 p.m.
Cinema Guild-Manhattan, Lorch Hall Aud., 7,8:40,10:20 p.m.
School of Public Health-Noontime Film Fest, And Who Shall Feed This
World?, SPH II Aud., 12:05-1 p.m.
AAFC-The Man Who Fell to Earth, Aud. A, Angell, 7 &9:30 p.m.
SPEAKERS.
Library Science-William C. Roselle, 1981 William Warner Bishop Lec-
ture-"A Moving Experience: The American Geographical Society Collec-
tion," 1:30 p.m., Rackham Amphitheatre.
Engin.-Gustav Paffenhofer, ''Feeding Behavior of Marine Copepods," 4
p.m., White Auditorium/Cooley Building..
CHGD and REP-Dr. Colin Jones of Oxford University, "Regulation of In-
trauterine Growth Rates," room 2237 Med Sci. II.
Vision Hearing-John Williams, "The Hess Effect for Stiles' pi-
Mechanisms," 12:15-1:30 p.m., 2055 MHRI.
Interdept. Program in Medicinal Chemistry-Dr. Michael Colvin, "The
Chemical Pharmacology of Cyclophosphamide," 4 p.m., 3554 CC Little.
Center for Japanese Studies-Slide show and talk, Marshall Wu, "A New
Look at the Shoso-in," Noon, Lane Hall Commons.
Biological Sciences-Robert Erickson, "Nuclear Control of Sper-
matogenesis," noon-1 p.m., 1139 Nat Sci.
IEEE-Brown Bag, Prof. Emeritus A.D. Moore, "Electrostatics," Noon,
1042 E. Eng.
The Alternative Review-Shaman Drum Bookshop-Poetry reading of
Yeats & selections of Joyce read by Bert Hornbeck & Frances McSparran,
Shaman Drum Bookshop, State St., 8 p.m.
MEETINGS
Special Faculty Assembly, 3:15 p.m., Chrysler Center.
Ann Arbor Advocates for Safe Alternatives in Childbirth- "Have It Your
Way: A nurse-midwife service for Ann Arbor and ASAC general
elections, 7 p.m., 3rd floor, First United Methodist Church, 602 East Huron.
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship-Mich. Union, 7 p.m., for info call 761-
6472.
Botticelli Game Players-Dominick's, Noon. ,
Sailing Club-311 W. Engin., 7:45 p.m.
PERFORMANCES
UAC Soundstage-Univ. Club, Mich Union, 9 p.m., free admission.
Artists & Craftsman Guild-Fall exhibition-briarwood Mall. For info call
763-4430. l
U-M Professional Program-Blood Knot, Lydia Mendelssohn Theater, 8
P.M.
Michigan League-International Night, Italy, 5-7:.15 p.m.
Michigan Union-Special exhibition & sale of original Oriental art, 10
a.m.-8 p.m. Approx. 800 pieces from Japan, China, India, Tibet & Thailand.
MISCELLANEOUS
Hillel-Yom Kippur Services,'Reform (at Hillel) at 10 a.m. & 5:15 p.m.;
Conservative (at Power Center) at 9 a.m. & 5:30 p.m.; Orthodox (at Hillel)
at 9 a.m. & 5:30 p.m.
Meekreh-Yom Kippur Break Fast, East -Quad Caf., for board contract
students only. Reservations required imiediately.
Chabad House-Yom Kippur morning services, 10 a.m.; Yizkor
(memorial) service, 12:30 p;m.; closing service, 5 p.m. 715 Hill St.
Tau Beta Phi-Free tutoring walk-in, 307 UGLI & 2332 Bursley, 7-11 p.m.
CCRB-Weight Training Programs, rm. 2260,7:30-9 p.m.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of:
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI., 48109.
UNIVERSITY COURSE 310
Cost Benefit Analysis:
Its Uses and Limits
ONE CREDIT MINI-COURSE

Tight budget may hurt
'U' affirmative action
(Continued from Page 1)
assistant research scientist at the In- and added that an Asian American
stitute for Social Research. Arce said needs to be affluent and have a high
educational opportunities for Hispanic grade point in order to be accepted to
students have not improved since the the University.
1960s. Native Americans regard the
TT. iversi-. +1, t hni i "YnJ i + s cv a.

t
y

uSIC.
1 *
OCTOBER 16 17 - MiCHIGAN THEATRE
Tms eh oguntex0

James Wong, a graduate student in
mathematics and computer science,
said Asian Americans feel trapped in
certain academic areas, such as the
sciences. There is a stereotype that
says Asian Americans must perform
better than their white peers, he said,

University as their schooi, since it was
built on Indian land and donated by In-
dians to the Catholic Church, said John
Bailey, consultant to Native American
student groups.
"It's up to the University to show sin-
cerity for everyone to share (the
University's) resources," he said.

Police have a suspect
in series of rapes in city

FALL CONTACTLENS SPECIAL
Extended Wear Soft Contact Lenses-$325
Wear for 2 weeks without remnov9l
Soft Contact Lenses-$169
Hard Contact Lenses (2 pairs)-$150
With the purchase of a pair of contact lenses, all prescription
glasses are 30% off, sunglasses 50% off.
Includes all professional fees.
DR. PAUL C. USLAN, Optometrist
545 Church St.
769-1222 Offer expires October 16

(Continued from Page 1)
involved in the series of rapes.
SOLVING RAPES THAT occur inside
the home can be difficult, Peterson said
Because an "indoor rape"is commit-
ted inside a home with the lights out,
the attacker is difficult to see, he said.
When a rape occurs outside, however,
there is usually some form of light by
which the victim can get at least a
glance of the rapist.

"The police are doing a very good
job" and using as many as six detec-
tives on the case, Peterson said.
CORBETT STRESSED the need for
preventitive measures on the part of
the public.
People should take the proper
precautions to protect themselves from
attack he said. Windows and doors
should be locked at the appropriate
times.

Police
notes

Flaming flyers
at Michigan Union
Several city fire trucks were called to
the Michigan Union last night when two
posters were set on fire. According to
the Union's Night Manager Bruce
Lawrie, the two flyers had already bur-
ned out by the time they were
discovered, but fire fighters were
called as a standard precautionary
measure.
One of the two flyers was posted on a
bulletin board outside the office of,
Student Organizations, Activities, and

Programs, and the other was taped to
the door of the Gay Liberation Front of-
fice on the Union's 4th floor.
UNISEX
Long or Short Haircuts
by Professionals at...
DASCOLA STYLISTS
Liberty off State ........ 668-9329
East U. at South U....... 662-0354
Arborland .............. 971-9975
Maple Village.......... 761-2733

TMnhII;;I I"

Need a ride
out of town*'?
Check the BMW'
classifieds under,
transportation

I

SCOLOF BUS,V
TUCK
The Amos Tuck School
of
Business Administration
Dartmouth College * Hanover, N.H.
Men and Women Seeking
Graduate Education for Management
are invited to discuss the

ii II.E

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