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October 03, 1981 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-03

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Page 2-Saturday, Oetober 3, 1981 -The Michigan Daily
East-West
espionage deal,
near completion

0

From AP and UPI
BONN, West Germany- Four East
German spies were swapped for about'
30 Western agents in a deal that will
also allow as many as 3,000 East Ger-
man civilians to emigrate to the West, a
West German TV station reported
yesterday.
The West German government
refused to give details of the operation
on grounds that premature publicity
had hampered talks on what was
believed to be one of the biggest spy ex-
changes in postwar history.
BUT GOVERNMENT spokesman
Kurt Becker confirmed that convicted
East German spy Guenther Guillaume,
whose arrest brought about the
resignation of Chancellor Willy Brandt
in 1974, has been delivered to East
German officials after seven years im-
prisonment.
The government issued a statement
saying it "considers the action to be
concluded." There was no comment
from the East Germans.
West Germany's ZDF television net-
work said the East Germans released
about 30 Westernsagents in return for
Guillaume and three others, including
former Defense Ministry Secretary
Renate Lutze. She was convicted of
espionage in the late 1970s for passing

hundreds of NATO and West German
military secrets to the East.
THE NETWORK said as many as
3,000 ordinary East Germans were also
expected to be allowed to emigrate to
the West for reunions with family
members who had already defected.
There have been many exchanges of
agents and political prisoners since
World War II, and the West German
government has spent millions of
dollars to free political prisoners held
by the East Germans..
One of the most highly publicized ex-
changes was the 1962 swap at the Berlin"
wall of American U-2 pilot Francis
Gary Powers for Soviet spy Rudolf
Abel.
MEANWHILE, government sources
in France said they would like to swap
an East German general jailed as a
Communist spy in exchange for a
major Soviet dissident such as Andrei
Sakharov, Yuri Orlov, or Anatoly Sh-
charansky.
French government sources said the
proposed swap was not part of the West
German Guillaume deal. Earlier repor-
ts leaked to the press had said Zorn was
originally included in the swap.
Bonn has reportedly paid $32.6
million tobuy freedom for these
refugees.

Daily Photo by MIKE LUCAS
Winter already?
This cold crisp October reminds at least two University students, Chris
Cleary (left) and Doug Hill, that sashaying down the slopes is not too far
away. Some areas in the Upper Peninsula have already reported more than
seven inches of snow.

(rburdiScientists
discover

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press international reports
Solidarity leader re-elected
GDANSK, Poland- Lech Walesa was resoundingly re-elected chairman of
the Solidarity union yesterday, beating back three radical challengers and
vowing to "continue peaceful warfare" with Poland's Communist
authorities.
"We are able to outmaneuver the strongest army," said a jubilant Walesa,
who had threatened to resign if he were defeated in the vote to continue
leading the 9.5 million-member union he has headed since its founding
August 1980 in the Gdansk shipyard strike.
Walesa promised to "try to break down factions" among the rank and file
that have divided the independent union's first convention. He attributed his
victory to his record during his unofficial union leadership.
The 38-year-old electrician easily defeated three other candidates.
Solidarity announced he got 462 of the votes cast, or 55.2 percent.
Iran holds new elections
ANKARA, Turkey- Millions of Iranians voted yesterday in the country's
third presidential election since Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini took power.
Revolutionary guards gunned down two anti-government protestors in fresh
outbreaks of violence.
Results were expected late next week, but Ali Khamenei was considered a
shoo-in against three other Khomeini loyalists to succeed Mohammad Ali
Rajai, who was assassinated inan Aug. 30 fire-bombing 37 days after taking
office.
Revolutionary Guards of the fundamentalist Moslem regime and zealots
from the "Party of God" were called up to protect voters. At one Tehran
mosque, officials said voters were being bodily searched before entering to
cast ballots.
In the southern city of Shiraz, revolutionary guards gunned down two
Mojahideen Khalq guerrillas and arrested two more in the only election day
violence reported so far by Tehran radio.
Space shuttle almost ready;
November launch date likely
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.- Repairs to the space shuttle Columbia will be
mostly finished by Oct. 13 and the ship should be ready for a delayed second
flight in early November, launch director George Page said yesterday.
"I can't commit to a launch date yet," Page said. "Early November still
looks very, very possible. Late October is probably optimistic."
The date probably will be set after a high-level conference here next
Friday.
Columbia had been scheduled to be launched on its second flight Oct. 9, but
a fuel spill last month loosened 365 of its 30,922 heat-resistent tiles and caused
some damage to a small fuel tank in its steering system.
Poor harvest to boost Soviet
dependence on U.S. grain
MOSCOW- The Kremlin, facing its third successive poor grain harvest, is
again looking to the United States to help feed the Soviet people.
Canadian Agricultural Minister E.F. Whelan yesterday quoted top Soviet
officials as saying the 1981 grain harvest will fall "substantially below" ex-
pectations. The Soviets also had poor harvests in the past two years, and are
expected to have record grain imports this year.
The latest large-scale grain deal was announced Thursday when U.S.
negotiators said they were making an additional 15 million metric tons of
grain available to the Soviet Union during the 12-month period ending Sept.
30, 1982. U.S. officials predicted the Soviets would buy at least two-thirds of
that amount.
The Soviets already had contracted to buy up to eight million metric tons
under a five-year agreement that was extended through next year, and the
latest announcement underscored the Kremlin's reliance on agricultural
imports.
The deal was made possible by President Reagan's decision in April to lift
the grain embargo.
01 e IMidjigan, BatIV
Vol. XCII, No. 21
Saturday. October :, 1981
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
scription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail
outside Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday
mojings. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7 by mail outside Ann
Arbor. Second class postage paid at Ann Aibor, Michigan. POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to United Press International.
Pacific News Service Los Angeles Times Syndicate and Field Newspapers Syndicate.
News room: (313) 764-0552, 76-DAILY, Sports desk, 764-0562. Circulation, 764.0558. Classified advertising

S
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FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
Worship Schedule:
8:30 a.m.-Holy Communion in the
Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Morning Wor-
ship in the Sanctuary.
Sermon for Oct. 4-"First Sunday In
October," by Dr. Donald Strobe.
Sunday World Wide Communion.
Church School for all ages-9:30 a.m.
and 11a.m.
Chor Rehearsal-Thursday at 7:15
P.M"
Miniters:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland '
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Education Directors:
Rose McLean and Carol Bennington
* * *
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
(The Campus Ministry
of the LCa-ALC-AELC)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
Sunday Worship at 10:30 a.m.
Wednesday 7:00 p.m. Choir practice.
* * *
NEW GRACE APOSTOLIC CHURCH
632 N. Fourth Ave.
Rev. Avery Dumas Jr., Pastor
9:45 a.m. Sunday School.
11:45 Morning Worship,
Bible Study-Wed. & Fri. 7 p.m.
For rides call 761-1530

UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF THE NAZARENE
409 South Division
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Rev. Steve Bringardner, 761-5941
Christian Education 9:45 a.m.
Service of Worship-11:00 a.m.
"Time of'Meeting"-6:00 p.m.
* * *
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH and
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
FOUNDATION
502 East Huron 663-9376
Jitsuo Morikawa, Pastor
10:00 a.m.-Sunday Worship. Child
care provided.
Oct. 4: "Gospel for Faculty and Stu-
dents," by Rev. Morikawa.
11:00 a.m.-Church School. Classes
for all ages. Class for undergraduates.
Class for graduates and faculty.
Also:
Choir Thursday 7:00 p.m., John Reed
director; Janice Beck, organist.
Student Study Group. Thurs., 6:00
p.m.
Support group for bereaved students,
alternate Weds. 7 p.m.
11:00 Brunch, second Sunday of each
month.
Ministry Assistants: Nadean Bishop,
Terry Ging, Barbara Griffin, Jerry
Rees.
* * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.-662-4466
Service of Worship:
Sunday 9:30 and 11:00a.m.
Wednesday: Bible Study, 8:45 p.m.
Thursday: Breakfast, 8:00a.m.

CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
A Campus Ministry of the
Christian Reformed Church
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
10:00 a.m. Service of Holy Com-
munion.
11:15 a.m. Lunch.
6:00 p.m. Evening Celebration.
Wednesday:
10:00 p.m. Evening Prayers.
* * *
ANN ARBOR MISSIONARY CHURCH
2118 Saline-Ann Arbor Rd. 668-6640
Rev. Marvin L. Claasen, Pastor
10:00 a.m. Sunday School
11 a.m. & 6 p.m. Worship Service
7:00 p.m. Wed. Bible Study & Prayer
A Cordial Welcome to All
* * *
ST. MARY'S
STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557 Sim
Weekly Masses:
Mon.-Wed.-5:10 p.m.
Thurs.-Fri.-12:10 p.m.
Sat.-7:00 p.m.
Sun.-8:30 and 10:30 a.m. (Upstairs
and downstairs)
12 noon and 5 p.m. (upstairs and
downstairs)
North Campus Mass at 9:30 a.m. in
Bursley Hall (Fall and Winter Terms)
Rite of Reconciliation-4 p.m.-5 p.n.
on Friday only; any other time by ap-
pointment.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
Serving the Campus for LC-MS
Robert Kavasch, Pastor
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
663-5560
Sunday Worship 9:15 and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Supper: 6:00 p.m.
Bible Study: Sunday-9:15 a.m.,
Wednesday-10 p.m., Thursday-10
p.m.

huge

voitd

in space
(Continued from Page 1)
few percent of the entire universe,"
Kirshner said. "We expectedthingseto
be relatively homogeneous but wye
found that the density varied a great
deal," he said.
Since the initial survey - completed
last spring - only sampled a small part
of the area past the Bootes constellation
the resttof the area had to be in-
vestigated to determine if the
phenomenon is as widespread as the
first survey showed, he said. That study
was done this spring.
The results are to be published in the
next few months, Kirshner said.
However, he said he was confident the
latest results would confirm the
discovery.
The cosmological principle governing
astronomy holds that "on the average,
galaxies ought to be homogeneous
throughout the universe," Kirshner
said. The only question remaining is
"how big a volume (of galaxies) do you
need to average over?" he said. The
latest discovery of a void shows that
"you need a big volume (to determine
homogeneous galaxies," he added.
Kirshner's colleagues include
Augustus Oemler of Yale University,
Paul Schechter of Kitt Peak, and
Stephen Shectman of Mount Wilson and
Las Campanas Observatories. Their
observations and data were recently
published in The Astrophysical Jour-
nal, entitled "A Million Cubic
Megaparsec Void in Bootes?"
The void was discovered using the
red shift distance measurement
technique. Red shift is the physical
phenomenon that causes an object's
color to become redder in proportion to
its speed away from the earth.
Generally, the faster an object is
moving, the farther it is from the earth.
While scientists can only see a small'
percentage of the entire universe, Kir-
shner said the discovery of the void
within the small percentage will be a
"hot topic for some time. The void is big
enough to make you think," he said.

7-

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Join
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News Staff

Editor in chief...................SARA ANSPACH
Managing Editor ..... ......... .:JULIE ENGEBRECHT
University Editor............... . .LORENZO BENET
News Editor .............. . ......... DAVID MEYER
Opinion Page Editors...............KEVIN TOTTIS
CHARLES THOMSON
Sports Editor.................MARK MIHANOVIC
Associate Sports Editors............ GREG DeGULIS
MARK FISCHER
BUDDY MOOREHOUSE
t DREW SHARP
Chief Photographer .............. PAUL ENGSTROM
ARTISTS: Robert Lence, Norm Christiansen. Jonathan
Stewart.
PHOTOGRAPHERS: Jackie Bell, Kim Hill, Deborah ,
Lewis, Mike Lucas, Brion Mosck.
MAGAZINE ARTS STAFF: Jane Carl, Mark Dighton.
Adam Knee. Pam Kramer. Gail Negbour. Howard
Witt.
NEWS STAFF: John Adam, Beth Allen. Doug Brice,
Crol Chaltrn. Andrew Chapman. Lisa Crumrine,
Debi Davis. Ann Marie Fazio. Pam Fickinger. Maureen
Fleming. Denise Franklin. Joyce Frieden, Mark Gin-
din. Julie Hinds. Steve Hook. Kathy Hoover. Jennifer
Miller, Don Oberrotmon. Janet Roe, David Spok. Fan.
nie Weinstein. Barry Witt.

SPORTS STAFF
SPORTS STAFF: Barb Barker, Randy Berger, Mark
Borowdki, Joe Chapele. Martha Crall, Jim Dworman,
John Fitzpatrick, Larry Freed, Chuck Hartwig, Chuck
Jaffe, John Kere, Larry Mishkin, Dan Newman, Ron
Pollack, Jeff Quicksilver, Steve Schaumberger,
Sarah Sherber, James Thompson, Kent Walley, Chris
Wilson, Bob Wojnowski.
BUSINESS STAFF
Business Manager. ..... RANDI CIGELNIK
Sles Manager. ... BARB FORSLUND
Operations Manager ....... SUSANNE KELLY
Display Manager...........MARY ANN MISIEWICZ
ClassifiedsManager............DENISE SULLIVAN
Finance Manager..............MICHAEL YORICK
Assistant Disoloy Manager.......... NANCY JOSLIN
Nationals Manager............SUSAN RABUSHKA
Circulation Manager ................. KIM WOODS
Sales Coordinator ............ E. ANDREW PETERSEN
BUSINESS STAFF: Liz Altman, Hope Borron, Lindsay
Bray, Joe Brodo, Alexander DePillis, Aida Eisenstadt.
Susan Epps, Wendy Fox, Sandy Frcko. Pamela Gould.
Kathryn Hendrick, Anthony Interrante, Indre Luitkus,
Beth Kovinsky, Barbara Miner, Coryn Notisse, Felice
Oper, Jodi Pollock, Michael Sovitt, Michael
Seltzer, Karen Silverstein, Sam Slaughter, Adrienne
Strombi, Nancy Thompson, Jeffrey Voigt.

'WHY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?'
Psalm 2:1 and Acts 4:25
"Ye that love the Lord hate evil! ... Take thou away from me the noise of
thy songs; for I will not hear the melody of thy viols. But let judgment run
down as waters, and righteousness as a mighty stream!" Psalm 7:10 and
Amos 5:23 and 24.
One may love the great hymns and music of the Church, but if one does
not "hate evil" It appears God does not appreciate the music, and it is
unacceptable!
"The heart in your bosom is a 'muffled drum' beating out a march to the
cemetery for you!" When they take you and me to the cemetery for deposit, it
is because our spirit has left this "home of clay" and gone to its "long
home," and back to God Who gave it. The Bible tells of two different kinds of
"long homes." One where "eye hath not seen, ear hath not heard, neither
hath entered the mind of man the things God hath prepared for them that
love him." - a man's mind is not capable of thinking of or imagining the
great good, joy and blessing of that home. We mouth much about "The love
of God" but it would be well if we considered more "our love for God" and

91

PUBLICATION SCHEDULE
1981
SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER
S M T W T F S SM T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S
;-a-a-4- 6 1 2 3 1 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5
10 1112 4 6 78 910 8 10111213714 6 8 91011712
13 1 J576 1718 19 11 131415 167 1 7 511718 17 9 2021 . t
20 22 23 24 25 26 1892021 22 23 24 22 24 25e6-;3-e
27 29 30 25 627 28 29 3 31 i 20as2
1982
I I te rnmev AdA nCM w1 -

And just like all of our other Value Meals, you get our
all-you-can-eat salad bar, a baked potato and a warm roll

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