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October 03, 1981 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

in Daily-Saturday, October 3, 1981-Page 3

Prankster arranges
sexual rendezvous

MINEOLA, N.Y.(AP)-At least 10
married women from Long Island say a
telephone caller posing as their
husbands' psychiatrist talked them into
having intimate relations with
strangers to alleviate sex problems
which the caller said their husbands
had.
The women duped into the strange
game say they went out on the street,
picked up men and returned home with
them to await "sex therapy" instruc-
lions from the mystery caller.
POLICE PUBLICIZED the scam
Thursday after four women came for-
ward with their bizarre stories saying
they had sex with strangers. Since
then, more than 100 women on Long
Island and in New York City called to
say they too had been targets of the
sexual con man and six more said they
had gone through with the scheme.
The man typically calls a married
woman in her late 30's saying he is a
psychiatrist secretly treating her
husband. He tells her the husband has
deep-seated sexual problems that have
brought him to the brink of suicide, but
that she can rescue him by taking part
in sexual therapy.

The wife is instructed to pick up a,
stranger and induce him to return home
with her by saying she needs help
moving a refrigerator or some other
heavy object. The men picked up were
not part of the scam, police said.
THE FAKE DOCTOR calls back and
persuades the man to perform sexual
acts with the wife while he gives in-
structions over the phone. The woman
is told not to mention the "therapy" to
her husband, lest it trigger adverse
psychological reaction.
"This guy is good," Nassau County
Detective Diance Berni said. "We have
talked to four women and three of the
men and they say he is articulate, glib
and absolutely convincing. He is very
smooth and very professional."
Each woman who went along did so
out of concern for her husband's life or
to preserve her marriage, police said.
The detective said the women were
"duped into activity they would not
normally do."
Police said the phony psychiatrist
apparently received some sort of
sexual gratification while giving direc-
tions to the couple of the telephone and
listening as they carried them out.

-

ANN ARBOR
INDIVIDUAL THEATRES
5th Awe at Lbe rty 7 14700
50 WED. SAT. SUN.
$1.50 'TIL 6:00 PM
$30. EVERY DAY LOW PRICE
(EXCEPT TUES $1.00 day)

WHY WON'T ANY OTHER
THEATRE IN ANN ARBOR
SHOW THIS MOVIE?
174 aki

BECAUSE ...
IT'S ABOUT A MAN AND
AN IN THEIR SEVtNTIES.

A WOM-

BECAUSE ...
IT DEALS WITH THE THINGS YOU
CARE ABOUT,'LIKE GROWING OLD,
FEARING DEATH INSTEAD OF PRO-
VIDING AN ESCAPE FROM REALITY!

I

-HAPPENINGS
HIGHLIGHT
A "Women and Science" workshop sponsored by the Center for Continuing
Education of Women will be held today at 170 Dennison, from 9:30 a.m. to
noon. The purpose of the informal workshop is to encourage students to con-
sider science-related majors and careers. Three panelists are featured:
Janice Jenkins, UM assistant professor of electrical & computer
engineering, Dr. Joann Wilson, assistant professor in the UM Medical
School, and Mancy Butts, research chemist at Dow Chemical Co.
FILMS
AAFC-Chepch and Chong's Next Movie, 7 & 9 p.m., Nat. Sci. Aud.
CG-The Graduate, 7 p.m.; Kramer vs. Kramer, 9 p.m., Lorch Hall Aud.
Cinema II-Loulou, 7 & 9 p.m ., Angell Aud. A.
Mediatrics - Fame, 3,7 & 9:30 p.m., MLB 3.
SPEAKERS
Theosophical Society-"Practical Meditation in Daily Life", First
Unitarian Church, 1917 Washtenaw, 4 p.m.
PERFORMANCES
PTP-MMirandolina (The Mistress of the Inn), Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre, Mich. League, 8 p.m.
School of Music - Voice recital, Richard Taylor, Recital Hall, 8 p.m.
Office of Major Events - Barry Manilow, Crisler Arena, 8 p.m.; Roger
Whittaker, Hill Aud. 8p.m.
Ark - The Madcat-Brubeck Band, 1421 Hill, 9 p.m.
Center for Russian. and E. European Studies/Judiac Studies-Benefit
Concert for Beth Israel Religious School, "The Hasidic Songs of
Maramures," Beth Israel Social Hall, 2000 Washtenaw, 9 p.m.
MEETINGS
Ann Arbor Go-Club-1433 Mason Hall, 2 p.m.
MISCELLANEOUS
Ann Arbor Bicycle Program - Free drop-in bike maintenance clinic,
Farmers Market, 9 a.m.-noon.
Washtenaw County League for Planned Parenthood-Contraceptive Non-
Use Conference, Brown-bag lunch; speakers Dr. John LaFerla and Dr.
Sylvia Hacker, School of Public Health, Room 3001, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Registration required.
Gelman Sciences, Inc.-Scientific Open House, 600 S. Wagner, 10 a.m.-2
p.m.
Artists and Craftsmen Guild/Student Organizations, Activities and
Programs-Fall Art Fair, Arborland Mall, 10 a.m.-9 p.m.
Greenpeace - James Watt Retirement Party, $2 donation - benefit for
Greenpeace, entertainment and food, 2619 S. Main, 2-7 p.m.
SYDA Foundation - Hatha Yoga beginners course, 902 Baldwin, 3:30-5:30
p.m.,
Hillel-Shabbat Seudah Shlishis, 1429 Hill, 6:45 p.m.
Folklore Society '2ann Arbor Friends of Traditional Music - square and
contra-dance, Mich. Union, 8p.m.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of:
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI., 48109.

NOW VOLUNTEER Halle Czechowski asks Kevin O'Connor to sign up in support of the ERA. Yesterday kicked off the
"Message Brigade," which is part of NOW's national push for ERA ratification.
ER A canvassers fid
their support waning

MELVIN DOUGLAS
m4 LIVA KEDROVA
9
.J'. f

DAILY-7:10, 9:00
SAT. SUN-1:30, 3:20, 5:20,
7:10, 9:10

BY PAM FICKINGER
Student members of the national
Message Brigade for the Equal Rights
Amendment have been in the Fishbowl
and out on the Diag, giving the hard sell
for the ERA and trying to rally support
for what many have called a lost cause.
Of the many political organizations in
the Fishbowl, one group, small in num-
ber but big in enthusiasm, is the
Message Brigade, which has been
asking students to sign petitions which
put their names on the mailing list of
'the National Organization of Women.
NOW will then send the students, who
make a $2 donation, pre-written letters
which they are in turn to send to key
legislators urging ratification of the
ERA.
But some members of the Message
Brigade find their task frustrating.
A number of members - part of the

final push for ratification of the ERA -
say that many students regard the ERA
as a lost cause and refuse to support it.
Jim Soos, a senior in the Residential
College who canvassed the Diag for
ERA, said students have lost interest in
the issue. "It took me the first hour to
get someone who was even interested,"
he said. "But, when you get one person
who really cares, it's really en-
couraging."
Heidi Stiner, another Brigade mem-
ber who canvassed outside the
Michigan Union, said that men seemed
to be more supportive of the ERA than
women. Stine, the liaison to the
Michigan legislature for NOW, said
that she received "more good response
from men than women."
She said she had little success in
rallying support for the ERA and that
many students said that the amen-
dment was a dead issue.

Stine said that although many studen-
ts were verbally supportive, few wan-
ted to bother with actively pushing the
issue. "So many students don't want to
be bothered with writing letters to
legislators," she said.
Kris Langabeer of the local NOW
chapter, however, said the Message
Brigade has received fairly strong
student support. "If all the supporters
(on the Brigade) got out and did their
bit, we could get the amendment
passed," she said.
The ERA needs three more states to
ratify it before the June, 1982 deadline.

2nd& FINAL WEEK
"A KNOCKOUT!
A VERY BIG,
BEAUTIFUL FILM.
THE BEST PER-
FORMANCE BY
AN ACTRESS
THIS YEAR."
-Vincent Canby,
New York Times
GLENDA
. , JACKSON
AS
(PG).
DAILY-7:20, 9:20
SAT. SUN-1;10, 3:10, 5:20,
7:20, 9:20
- - - - - - - - - -

MX, B-1 to lead
defense buldup

(Continued from Page 1)
curate than either the Titan or
Minuteman, would likely be stationed
at Titan sites in Arizona.
Reagan dismissed a "shell-game"
approach to MX deployment,
He said basing the missiles in holes in
the western desert would leave them
"just as vulnerable" as placing them in
existing silos.
"NO MATTER how many shelters we
might build the Soviets can build more
missiles - more quickly and just as
cheaply," he said.
Senate Armed Services Chairman
John Tower, (R-Texas), disagreed,
saying the president's missile system is
"enormously vulnerable" to Soviet at-
tack. He said he would have preferred
the shuttle approach with shelters in
Utah and Nevada.
The blueprint for the nation's
strategic forces was described within
the administration as the most impor-
tant military decision Reagan might
face - and by at least one official as
"probably one of the most important
decisions any president has ever

made." It ended months of speculation.
The administration described the
highlights of the program this way:
* The first models of the MX, for
missile-experimental, will be deployed
in 1986. The old Titan missiles will be
deactivated as soon as possible.
* by 1984, a decision will be made about
other MX deployment methods, which
could involve placing them aboard
long-endurance aircraft, in deep silos,
or in the current silos with an anti-
ballistic missile defense program to be
developed. A combination of systems,
could be adopted.
-Reagan decided the B-1 should be
built, operational in 1986, until the Ad-
vanced Technology Bomber, or radar-
eluding "Stealth" airplane, can be
deployed in the 1990s.
" the nation's communications network
involving command centers and
nuclear forces in the air and under
water will be upgraded to improve
chances of survival during nuclear at-
tack.
e Construction will continue on the
Trident ballistic missile submarines,

B e an a n y e
Read ObeBMW
764-0558

99 ANN ARBOR
CHEAP FLICKS
FRI & SAT NIGHT
ALL SEATS 994
AT 12:00 AM
MUSIC BY
DEVO AND MORE
arHEAVY
~METAL
(R)
AT 11:30 P.M.
One of the
year's 10
best.
-Time
ALTERED_
STATES -

,.'n
f

Theway opera should be given and seldom is.
- The Baltimore Sun

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7 T S OFFICE OF MAJOR EVENTS PRESENTS.
STUES. OCTOBER 6 HILL AUDITORIUM
TICKETS ON SALE NOWII ALL HUDSON'S, CTC OUTLETS. AND
MICHIGAN UNION BOX OFFICE MF I11:30.301Information 763-6922

'l2

Sheryl King Lassarotti, soprano James Javore, baritone
Zerlina, a peasant girl Don Giovanni, a licentious
nobleman
Scheduled for Saturday night's performance

(oldovsky Opera Company
Mozor's "DonG(iovanni"
nEnglish
Gat ,Oct. 10.at&00
Gun.,Oot .,IIaL3:00
Power- Center

edII ara

I rvnIo j W U % / NARITfl'lIUJ ' & 'v'JI

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