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September 30, 1981 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-09-30

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Page 2-Wednesday, September 30, 1981-The Michigan Daily

Minn. prof conducts
classified research.

"It's m water"

(Continued from Page 1)
war," he said.
The newspaper report said leaf and
stem samples were analyzed for
mycotoxin, a chemical poison the U.S.
government suspects the Soviet Union
developed into a potential biological
weapon.
SECRETARY OF State Alexander
Haig said in a recent speech in West
Germany that he had positive evidence
chemical warfare had been used in In-
dochina. The State Department later
called the evidence preliminary.
Mirocha said he received two leaf
and stem samples in late July from a
private pharmacologist in Philadelphia
and that the samples were to be
analyzed for mycotoxin.
. The Philadelphia pharmacologist
forwarded results of the analyses to the

State Department.
STATE DEPARTMENT officials
said the test results eventually would be
released, but that details including the
potency of the chemicals remained
classified.
"We'll release it when the time is
right," State Department spokesman
Dred Selick told the newspaper.
Lab workers said analysis of the
plant samples revealed high levels of
three kinds of mycotoxins:
trichothecene, or T2 toxin; nivalenol,
and deoxynivalenol.
One experiment showed one toxin
reached 130 parts per million, which is
nearly 10 times the amount in animal
feed containing mold. The levels were
far in excess of what were needed to
make animals ill, the tests reportedly
showed.

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Congress prepares bill
allowing debt of ,$1 trillion
WASHINGTON- Despite a long night of protest by Democrat William
Proxmire the Senate was poised yesterday to send President Reagan a bill:
allowing tie national debt to eclipse $1 trillion for the first time.
The House has approved an increase in the federal debt ceiling to $1.079
trillion. Unless Congress agrees on a new debt figure by midnight tonight,
the Treasury will be unable to borrow money to honor Social Security and §
government paychecks as early as next Monday.
Proxmire clambered around the heights of rhetoric for more than 16 hours .
trying to hold down the national debt. When he rested yesterday, the exer-
cise had cost taxpayers more than $64,000.
Religious extremists hijack

Russiaon dissident
shares experiences
,(Continued from Page 1)
stand as relics of another era. "Nobody Literature Prof. Carl Proffer, with
observes them seriously," said Kopelev whom Kopelev is a guest, said it is dif-
who was expelled last January and ficult to convey how life is in the Soviet
currently lives in West Germany.' Union to anyone who has not actually
IN ONE OF the Soviet provinces on been there.
the Baltic Coast, many apartment lan- Kopelev, who will give a lecture
dlords pay 50 rubles (about 75 dollars) today with his wife at 4 p.m. in
so they don't have to display the Soviet Rackham, said "freedom is a dream in
flag from their buildings on official Russia," and he said he hoped the
Soviet holidays, Kopelev said. current situation can be remedied
University Slavic Language and without bloodshed.
'U'me revealed

in another
(Continued from Page 1)-
PARSONS SAID there hasn't been
much demand for revealing male
calendars because "women' are much
more romantic in their sexual ideal."
"They are turned on by the written
word - novels, stories," Parsons said,
adding that in her opinion calendars
were attracting attention "mainly
because they're something novel."
Response from female University
students showed general acceptance

calendar
and some enthusiasm for the introduc-
tion of another twelve male pinups.
"IT'S FUN TO look at them, but .1
don't think I would put out money for
them," said Rebecca Matzo, an art
school sophomore, adding, "I'm not
against it; I'm not into it."
"Yeah, I might buy it, if the men are
good-looking, sure," said Patti Gowans,
a junior in the School of Education.
Nancy Schuur, an' LSA senior, said,
"If they can stick womenin calendars,
they can put men in."
Schuur was undecided about pur-
chasing one of the calendars, ex-
plaining, "My boyfriend probably,
wouldn't like it."

Indian jetliner, hold hostages
LAHORE, Pakistan- Five Sikh extremists armed with daggers and a
hand grenade yesterday hijacked an Indian jetliner with 117 people aboard
and forced it to land in Lahore, where they freed 67 of the hostages,
diplomatic sources reported.
The Sikh extremist group called Dal Khalsa claimed responsibility for the;
hijack. At a news conference in Amritsar, the group demanded India free a
jailed Sikh leader, Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale, arrested Sept. 20 on murder
charges. It also demanded India pay $500,000 and free all jailed supporters of
the Sikh independence movement in exchange for the remaining hostages.
One of the hijackers in Lahore told an Indian-Pakistani negotiating team
that the aircraft was seized to gain publicity for the Khalistan movement
which demands a homeland for India's 13,million Sikhs.
American Medical Assn, sells
'embarrassing' tobacco stock
CHICAGO- The American Medical Association, long a fervent crusader
against smoking, has rid itself of $1.4 million of "embarrassing" tobacco
stock, a spokesman said yesterday.
The sale of R.J. Reynolds Industries and Philip Morris stock was com-
pleted recently by the New York investment firm and bank that handle the
AMA's stock portfolio, the spokesman said. He said the move stems from
publicity the AMA received after it voted against such a move at its June
convention.
"The publicity hurt ... We've been trying to get people to stop smoking,"
said the spokesman, who asked not to be identified.
He said editorial writers and cartoonists had a "field day" with the issue.
When the AMA tried to persuade newspapers and magazines to drop cigaret-
te advertising, the efforts were ignored by many of the same publications
that criticized the investment, he said.
Foster spoke with Hinckley
after assassination attempt
NEW YORK- Actress 'Jodie Foster-who previously denied talking to
John Hinckley-had two telephone conversations with the man accused of
shooting President, law enforcement officials said yesterday.
At an April 1 news conference at Yale University; where Foster is now a
sophomore, the actress said she had never "met, spoken to or in any way
associated with one John Hinckley."
But law enforcement officials said Hinckley tape recorded two telephone
conversations with the 18-year-old actress.
The tapes containing the conversations were found in Hinckley's
Washington hotel room shortly after the president and three others were
shot in Washington March30.
In a brief tephone interview yesterday, Foster confirmed that she had
spoken with Hinckley but declined to discuss the matter in any detail.
"It's not anything I can talk about," she said with reference to the ap-
parent discrepancy between her April 1 statement and the telephone tapes.
She added that federal officials had requested her not to discuss the case.
bel £idiigan Aai1y
Vol. XCII, No. 18
Wednesday, September 30, 1981
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
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The Michigan Doily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to, United Press International,
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News room: (3)3) 764-0552, 76-DAILY, Sports desk, 764-0562, Circulation, 764-0558, Classified advertising

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CHARLES THOMSON
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PUBLICATION SCHEDULE
1981
SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER
a4-6 1 2 3 1 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5
101112 4 6 7 8 9 10 8 101121314 6 8 9 101112
13 7516 171819 111 13 14 15 16 17 15 17 18 19 20 21
20122232425 26 18920 21 22 23 24 22 24 25 26-;2f-?a
27 293 25 6 27 28 29 30 31
1982
JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL
SMTWT F S S M T W T F S SM T W T F S S M T W T F S

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