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September 30, 1981 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-09-30

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1

The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, September 30, 1981-Pagel
Military academies'
applications rise 42%

NEW YORK (AP) - Freshmen at the
nation's five military academies and at
top engineering schools withstood stif-.
fer competition than. ever in gaining
admission this fall, according to a sur-
vey of leading colleges and universities.
The number of applicants for this
fall's freshman classes at West Point,
the Naval Academy, Air Force
Academy, Coast Guard Academy and
the Merchant Marine Academy rose 42
percent over a year ago - from 31,695
to 45,128, according to the survey by
Peterson's Guides, Inc., a Princeton,
N.J. publisher of educational referen-
ces.
THE ACADEMIES accepted only 14
percent of 1981 applicants - making
them nearly twice as tough to get into
as Ivy League schools, which accepted
26 percent of applicants. About 80 per-
cent of those accepted actually entered
the academies this fall, compared with
the typical school average of about 50
percent.
"All five academies are completely
free, and with all the current talk about
the high cost of college education, more
and more families see the academies as
an excellent¢ alternative," said

publisher Peter Hegener in an inter-
view.
"Second, there aren't any wars right
now, and academies offer the oppor-
tunity for immediate employment after
graduation. And finally, with the new
conservatism, the current sense is it's
OK to be a military officer," said
Hegener:
THE SURVEY looked at application
trends at 182 of the nation's most com-
petitive public and private universities.
A total of 788,695 students applied to
those top schools, up six percent from
732,945 a year earlier. A total of 146,331

were accepted, up just one percent
from 144,852 in 1980.
Of the 182 schools surveyed, 133 had
an increase in applicants, 48 had a
decrease and one had no change. The
average increase at top schools was
300.
Three of the most competitive
engineering schools - Massachusetts
Institute of Technology, California In-
stitute of Technology, and Rensselaer
Polytechnic Institute - received an
average of nine percent more ap-
plications for this fall than a year ago.

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Invastion of the hydrants AP
These fire hydrants reclining next to the Chemistry building are part of a $69,000 project to replace and improve the
University's underground hydrant system. Officials say the new system should be in place within two weeks, replacing
the old system which didn't work for many years. Though human members of the University may well ignore the new
hydrants popping up all over the Diag, canine members have expressed interest in the project.

Auditi or a CABARET
Singers, Dancers, Musicians,
Joke Tellers, etc.
St. Mary's Student Chapel
331 Thompson Street
September 29, September 30, October 1
at 8:00 pm
Call 663-0557, for more details
(Performance for December 3, 4, and 5)

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Poorest
countries
" to receive
less aid

WASHINGTON (UPI)- Because the
United States has scaled back its con-
tribution for international aid to the
world's, poorest nations, 32 other donors
countries decided yesterday they have
the right to do the same.
The action could mean the Inter-
national Development Association, the
branch of the World Bank that lends to
the lowest-income countries, will have
only three-quarters of the money this
fiscal year that it expected.
ACCORDING TO several informed
sources, the decision was made in a
closed meeting of IDA donors-on the
same day President Reagan addressed
the annual meeting of the World Bank
and International Monetary Fund.

assuring them of continued U.S. sup-
port.
Reagan, World Bank President A.W.
Clausen and IMF managing director
Jacques de Larosiere struck a common
theme in speeches to the annual
meeting-that developing countries
will progress only if both rich and poor
nations undertake basic economic
reforms.
Their message was that the key to
development is not vast sums of aid, but
"adjustment" of national economies.
THE REASON for their stand was
plain. World inflation, stagnation in in-
dustrial countries and high interest
rates threaten to slow the development
of poor countries. But those same for-

ces are also making rich nations less
willing to give financial aid.
Last year 33 nations, including the
United States, agreed to provide $12
billion to operate IDA during 1981-83.
The U.S. share was $3.24 billion, or 27
percent, which was to be paid in three
installments of $1.08 billion.
But when Congress approved the U.S.
contribution last summer it stretched
the payments out, providing $500
million in 1981, $850 million in'1982 and
$1.85 billion in 1983.
At their meeting yesterday, sources
said, the IDA donors agreed they now
have the right to scale back their con-
tributions for 1982.

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Interested in Journalism
but sick of Ibte ?faiVg?
Join the staff of the
MSA newspaper
People needed for;
" reporting
*editing
" layout
",.graphics
* co-ordinating
Come to the Mass Meeting
Wed.. Sept. 30-9:00 n.m.
MSA Chambers
(3rd Floor Union)

................................... ............................

-HAPPENINGS-
HIGHLIGHTS
The University Activities Center's comedy series Laugh Track opens a
new season today at the University Club, Michigan Union. Doors open at 8:30
p.m., the show begins at 9 p.m. Opening night admission is free.
FILMS
Cinema Guild-Murder My Sweet, Lorch Hall Aud., 7:15 p.m.; The Long
Goodbye, Lorch Hall Aud., 9 p.m.
Cinema II-Old Acquaintance, MLB 3, 7 p.m.; That Hamilton Woman,
MLB 3, 9p.m.
Classic Film Theater-Kurosawa Festival, Do dis'kaden, Lorch hall Aud.,
4:30and8:45p.m.
SPEAKERS
Department of Chemistry-jonathan Swan, "Determination of Trace
Metals in Powder Samples by X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry," Rm. 1200
Chem. Blds., 4 p.m.; Sultan Abu-Orabi, "Stabilized Vinyl Cations," Rm. 1300
Chem Bldg., 4 p.m.
Dept. of Anthropology-J. Peter Brosius, "Beforestation, Succession and
Adaptation to Upland Luzon, Phillipines", 12:10 p.m., 2009 Museum of An-
thropology.
Architecture - brown bag lee., discussion of the article, "From Bauhaus
to our House", Architecture School Aud., noon.
Center for Russian and East European Studies-brown bag lee., Associate
Dean William Zimmerman, "Predicting Soviet Military Expenditures: The
Minister of Finance's Annual Speeches," Commons Rm., Lane Hall, noon-1
p.m.
Dept. of Slavic Languages- Soviet scholars Lev Kopelev and Raya
Orlova, Rackham Amp., 4th floor, 4 p:m.
CAAS-Ernest Wilson, "Alternative Technology, Alternative Politics, and
Alternative Futures," 247 Lorch Hall, noon.
AAUP - Peter Steiner, "Discontinuance Procedures and Tenure,"
Michigan RTm., 2nd floor, Mich. League, noon.
Natural Resources-Mark Reimers, director of legislative affairs for U.S.
Forest Service, "Legislation Affecting Public Forest Policy," Rm. 1040,
Dana Building, 3-5 p.m.
ECKANKAR-"Bringing Your Life Into Focus," Ann Arbor ECK Center,
302 E. Liberty (at 5th), 7:30 p.m.
Earthwatch-Dean Tousley, "Boondoggle in the Dessert: the MX
Missile," 443 Mason Hall, 7:30 p.m.
MEETINGS
CEW-brown bag lunch, for women returning or recently returned to
school, 1350 S. Thayer St., noon-i1:30 p.m.
Rackham Christian Forum-Mtg., Michigan League studio, noon.
LSA Student Government-Mtg., MSA Chambers, 3rd floor Michigan
Union, 6:15p.m.
PERFORMANCESn
UAC-Laugh Track, opening night, University Club, Union, 9 p.m. (doors
open at 8:30), free admission first night.
Office of Major Events-Alice Cooper in Concert, Crisler Arena.
Ark-Open mike night, 1421 Hill St., 9 p.m.
MISCELLANEOUS
Transcendental Meditation Program-an introduction, Rm 4315, Michigan
Union, 8 p.m.
Chabad House-Rosh Hashana Tashlith, 715 Hill St:, 10:00 a.m. and 7:15
p.m.
Alpha Phi Omega Blood Drive-Michigan Union, 11-5 p.m.
Hillel-Rosh Hashanah services, Orth. (at Hillel) 9 a.m.; COns. (at Power
Center) 9 p.m.
Int. Folk Dances Club-Advanced teaching and dancing, Union, 8-

". i >
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...

There's no MAGIC
to it:
Read THE DAIS V

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