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April 18, 1980 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1980-04-18

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Page 2-Friday, April 18, 1980-The Michigan Daily
CENTRAL INTELLIGENCEAGENCY
FOREIGN
LANGUAGE
r SPECIALISTS
ARABIC TURKISH UZBEK
AZERI KAZAKH CHINESE
BENGALI KIRGHIZ JAPANESE
PUSHTU TURKMEN KOREAN
RUSSIAN (scientific and technical)
The Central Intelligence Agency has openings for idi-
viduals qualified in any of the above languages. Thorough
knowledge of the written language, idiomatic command
of English, good educational background, and knowledge
of current.iiternational affairs required. Some compre-
hension of spoken language desirable.
The positions are full time and are located in the
Washington, D.C. area.
Salaries range from $13,925 to $20,611. U.S. Citizen-
ship is required.
Send resume to:
Personnel Representative
Department A, Room 821-I
P.O. Box 1925
Washington, D.C. 20013
An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer
Two races approx.
4&8 miles
Starts in Diag
Register the
morning of
the race in the
Diag 7-8 A.M.
Saturday, April 19
race begins 9 A.M.
z_ CHI OMEGA
presents
RUN FOR A REASON
$2 ENTRY FEE
ProceAed donated to Kidney Foundation of Michigan
SPONSORS:
more info cil: 9 Moe's Sport Shop
662-9156 Pizza Bob's
MSA
Tortoise and the Hare

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LSA committee may
fund Women's Studies
(Continued from Page 1) On Wednesday, more than 600 per-
ACCORDING TO an LSA rule, no 300- sons marched to Frye's office in sup-
level course or above may be taught by port of the Women's Studies Program
a teaching assistant. Many of the and presented a list of demands. Frye
classes in the Women's Studies said the committee's ideas are
Program are taught by TAs. Although "generally agreeable" with the
the department was given a year-long demands, although there are some dif-
exception to this rule, many people ferences.
were concerned that this would harm ACCORDING TO Frye, the commit-
the program. tee feels the curriculum will probably
Frye said he was not sure whether the include some form of introductory
appointment of the faculty members courses, a core of 300-level courses, and
would offset the loss of the TAs. "It's. a a few advanced courses.
change in the thrust of the program, in- Frye also stressed that in addition to
volving faculty in the curriculum," he Women's Studies courses, a concen-
said. trator should also have a significant
Frye said he could not determine amount of work in another department.
when these positions would be filled. **********************
"Ordinarily, filling a faculty position
takes a year - sometimes two years," Daily Official Bulletin
he said. He added it would be damaging
"to force it (hiring) rapidly."
According to Frye, the Executive Friday, April18, 1980
Committee will provide a basic Daily Calendar
framework for the program, but the WUOM: John Bowditch, "Armageddon or World,
faculty will have to "fill in the niches." Peace?", 115for s s "ia.m.
Cetr rS&SEAS: Douglas Paauw, "Posswiities
These procedures are normal for any of Labor-Intensive Growth in Indonesia," Lane
department, he added. Commons, noon.
"I THINK by the end of this month IPPS: Bowman Cutter, Dir. for Budget, U.S. Office
of Management and Budget, "The Budget Process,
it's likely that we'll have reached a ELec., Rackha ,12:30p.h.r
concensus on the revisions for the Urban & Regional Planning: Andrew Hamer,"Are
Women's Studies Program that we Third World Cities Structurally Different from Cities
think are necessary," Frye said. in Industrialized Countries: A Comparative
Physics/Astronomy: E. Hafner, Williams
would try° tQ make it possible to Collelge, "Microcomputers as Teachers," 296 Den-
"provide some release time for a nison, 4p.m.
faculty member to work on the Astronomy: Richard G. Teske, "What to Look for
*c e A* in Spring Skies," Aud. B, Angell, 8:30 p.m.

Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press international reports

reiin eine auin £OU1ne LI sU LZ ummerA ort
next fall.

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ACWN
T Don't Forget: "Meet the
Michigan Theatre, May 2-4"
6 a

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Zimbabwe gains autonomy
SALISBURY, Zimbabwe-Britain's last African colony, Rhodesia,
became the black-ruled nation of Zimbabwe at midnight yesterday, born in
the blood of civil war and the hope of a hard-won peace.
Under the brilliant footlights of a soccer stadium, British army Sgt.
Maj. John O'Donnell ceremoniously lowered the Union Jack-first planted
in the territory nine decades ago at the height of the Victorian expansion-for
the last time. In its place, Comrade Kambau, a former black nationalist
guerrilla, raised the new Zimbabwean flag, a multi-colored banner
respresenting the land's races and riches.
Prince Charles of Britain then handed over power, in the form a scrolled
act of the British Parliament granting independence, to the president of the
new state, Canaan Banana.
The new nation's name stems from an ancient African kingdom that
flourished in the region. The green of its flag represents the land, the yellow
its mineral riches, the red the blood spilled in the war, the black its native
people and the white its onetime colonists.
Reagan, Bush get boosts
Republican front-runner Ronald Reagan and chief rival George Bush
both gained boosts yesterday for Pennsylvania's big primary next week,
while Sen. Edward Kennedy vowed to "go on, and on, and on" against
President Carter.
Reagan stood to benefit by the withdrawal of Rep. Philip Crane of Illinois,
a fellow conservative,~from the GOP race. Crane, beaten badly in every
primary he has entered, said he would campaign for Reagan's nomination
and election as a "mainstream conservative candidate."
At the same time, Bush picked up the support of six Arkansas delegates
to the Republican National Convention who previously has been
uncommitted or plegdged to candidates no longer in the race. Their switch
gave the former U.N. ambassador eight of that state's 19 delegates; Reagan
has nine, and two still are uncommitted.
Cuban refugees gain asylum,
say they were 'harassed'
SAN JOSE, Costa Rica-Cuban 'refugees arriving from the Peruvian
Embassy in Havana on Thursday claimed supporters of President Fidel
Castro insulted them and took their personal belongings before allowing
them to leave.
Two planes brought 254 refugees during the second day of an airlift from
communist Cuba, bringing the total flown here so far to 490. Peruvian
officials said some 9,700 Cubans were still waiting'to leave their homeland.
The refugees, including women and children, looked wan and tired as they
stepped off two "freedom flights" manned by the Costa Rican airlihe, and
were taken tok a former presidential residence in San Jose for hot food,
rest, and processing.
Some of the refugees were so exhausted they collapsed on the floor in
small groups and went to sleep without waiting for mattresses.
Japan's Nissan Motors to
build $300 milin US. plant
As the economy of the United States heads into recession and layoffs
mount, Nissan Motors, the Japanese automaker, announced plans yesterday
to build a $300 million Datsun truck plant in this country and employ about
2,200 workers.
In Tokyo, Takaski Ishihara, president of Japan's Number Two
automaker, said he hoped Nissan's decision will halt criticism from U.S.
automakers and politicians over increasing sales of Japanese cars in
America at a time of rising unemployment among U.S. auto workers.
Layoffs of American auto workers have increased steadily since December.
The latest figures show 163,000 on indefinite layoff and 42,900 on temporary
layoff.
Late in anticipating consumer demand for small fuel-efficient cars,
General Motors, Ford, and Chrysler have been losing sales to foreign
automakers. Detroit's Big Tree and officials of the United Auto Workers
have complained the Japanese should either build in the United States or be
charged more to export here.
Armenian vengeance squad
wounds Turk diplomats
ROME-An Armenian vengeance squad struck again at the Turkish
diplomatic corps yesterday, wounding the ambassador to the Vatican from
ambush.in reprisal for Turkish extermination of Armenians early in the
century. Turkey asked European governments for better protection of its
diplomats.
Armenian terrorists have also claimed responsibility for the
assassination of seven Turkish diplomats and their relatives in European
cities and in Los Angeles and Beirut in recent years.
(USPS 344-900)

Volume XC, No. 158
Friday, April 18, 1980
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109.
Subscription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail
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News room: (313) 764-0552, 76-DAILY: Sports desk: 764-0562: Circulation: 764-0558: Classified advertising:
764.0557: Display advertising: 764-0554: Billing: 764-0550: Composing Room: 764-0556.

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Editor-in-Chief ....................
Managing Editor ................. .
City Editor...... ......... .
University Editor ..... . ...........
Editorial Page Editors ............ .
Magazine Editors ............... .
Arts Editors .....................
Sports Editor ...............:... .
-E eutv Soo. ts.d.. os. ...:...

. MARK PARRENT
* MITCH CANTOR
PATRICIA HAGEN
... TOMAS MIRGA
JOSHUA PECK
HOWARD WITT
ELISA ISAACSON
R.J. SMITH
MARK COLEMAN
DENNIS HARVEY
.. ALAN FANGER
ELISA FRYE

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Business Manager.........., ROSEMARY WICKOWSKI
Soles Manager............:........DANIEL WOODS
Operations Manager............KATHLEEN CULVER
Display Manager...... . ...., KRISTINA PETERSON
Classified Manager. . .... ...........SUSAN KLING
Nationals Manager. . . ....... ROBERT THOMPSON
Finance Manager.,.. . ... ..... GREGG HADDAD
Circulation Manager . . ...-- - JAMES PICKETT
Ad Coordinator. ,...............PETE PETERSEN
BUSINESS STAFF: Patricia Barron, Maxwell Benolie',
In-ak Rndn Ce '... C. ra- lnndi ria:-nk

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