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April 18, 1980 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-04-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

7,000 STUDENTS COMPLETE FORMS A T CRISP

Course evaluation

project begins

By MITCh STUART
LSA students have apparently taken
a strong interest in the newly-
implemented Michigan Student
Assembly course -evaluation program
being administered at CRISP during
early registration. Approximately 7,000
people have taken time to fill out the
evaluation forms, according to MSA-
President and project originator Marc
Breakstone.
LSA freshman Michael Goldman
said, "I'd like to see the new students,

get an idea of what's going'on - my
courses are the ones a lot of freshmen
take."
Goldman said he has used the Student
Counseling Office, but would like to
eventually see a University-wide
evaluation program.
SUCH A PROGRAM is Breakstone's
stated long-term goal. The proposal has
received. some support, albeit limited
and scattered, throughout the Univer-
sity community.
Administration of LSA evaluations at

early registration is the first phase of
the long-term project. Breakstone said
he hopes the program will eventually
move into classrooms and provide
evaluations for every course the
University offers.
The newly-elected MSA president ex-
plained that the favorable student reac-
tion to the project has arisen because
"people see the need for it and they un-
derstand that by filling them out it will
help them in the fall.
"It's clearly a student project for
student benefit," he added.
ASSISTANT Registrar Tom Karunas,
who supervises the CRISP lines, said
the administrators of the evaluations
have been "very cooperative. They've
held up their end of the agreement as to
what they would do and what they
wouldn't do."
Breakstone said two of his major
goals for the evaluation project have
not changed. He said publication of the
evaluation results next fall will provide
both an index for students to choose

their winter term courses and "make a
very powerful statement to the ad-
ministration that course evaluations
are very important to students."
Such a "powerful statement" is
probably needed if students are to con-
vince faculty and administrators that
they should consider evaluations im-
portant and even necessary for a
quality educational institution.
The central issue that splits students,
faculty, and administrators into fac-
tions is the conflict between the various
uses for course evaluations. The three
primary uses are:
" For personal instructor infor-
mation and improvement;
" For. administrative decision-
making (e.g. tenure); and,
" For student decisions on courses
and instructors.
There is no apparent consensus
among administrators, faculty, and
students as to which use for evaluations
should take priority. '

The Michigan Daily-Friday, April 18, 1980-Page 3
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Carter imposes new
sanctions on Iran

Bani-Sadr insisted Iran was "mostly
*self-sufficient" and would not be en-
dangered by a broad trade embargo.
BUT BANI-SADR nonetheless
threatened anew to cut off Iranian oil to
nations that join in the U.S. sanctions.
Carter said weapons that were or-
dered by Iran before the crisis, but
which have been impounded by the U.S.
government, will be sold or diverted to
American defense use.
In addition, the president said during
a nationally broadcast news conference
he will prohibit all imports from Iran,
even though trade between the two

countries already is virtually
nonexistent..
Only food and medicine have been un-
touched by the trade cutoff so far. Car-
ter said if the sanctions he announced
yesterday are not effective, he will ban
those few shipments that have con-
tinued. In addition, he said he is
prepared to ask other nations to
cooperate in barring international
communications to and from Iran.
Carter also appealed to American
news organizations to limit their ac-
tivities in Iran, but said he would not in-
terfere in press operations.

Regents approve
MSA fee hike,

Daily Classifieds Get Results
BOB
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BACK
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Comedian, Singer, Entertainer'
Audience Participation
in the HURON TOWERS Across
from'the VA Hospital
2200 Fuller Rd., Ann Arbor

(Continued from Page 1)
Arbor), who voted against the fee hike,
said that if SLS was going to be changed
from the "low budget, low cost
operation" it started as, then perhaps
the Board should consider placing it
directly under administrative control.
MSA President Jim Alland responded
that the fee hike was not an
0r unreasonable request, and it would
allow SLS to attract and maintain
quality attorneys.
Regent Robert Nederlander (D-
Birmingham) said requring MSA to ask
the Board for each additional fee hike
every year would help keep the Assem-
bly accountable. He and Regent David
Laro (R-Flint) supported Baker's
motion to approve the hike only one
year at a time.
Both Regent Sarah Power (D-Ann
Arbor) and Regent Gerald Dunn (D-
* Lansing) spoke in favor of granting
MSA the three-year hike.
"MSA HAS PROVED to be extremely
responsible," said Dunn. "They've got-
ten their house in order, and until they
do something that puts their house out

of order, quite frankly, I think we can
trust them."
In other action yesterday, the Regen-
ts heard an analysis of possible sites for
a new hospital from University plan-
ners Johnson, Johnson and Roy, and the
Hospital Planning Office. They did not
vote on a site yesterday because
several memberssof thebBoard
requested to see a written motion. They
are expected to approve the north site
recommended by Johnson, Johnson and
Roy at this morning's meeting.
The north site is 5.7 acres of land on
the medical campus bordered' on the
north by the. railroad and on the south
by North University Drive. The
proposed hospital site faces the river
valley.
The'Regents also voted to approve
the 1981 University Hospital Operating
Budget, which will provide $147.5
million in revenues for the hospital.
Rob Leighton, a student represen-
tative of the People's Board of Regents
spoke in conjunction with Big Business
Day. (See related story, Page 5.)

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FILMS
School of Public Health-Noontime Film Fest, Are Vou Doing This for
Me, Doctor, or Am I Doing This for You?, 12:10 p.m., School of Public
Health Aud. II.
Ann Arbor Film Co-op-The Friends of Eddie Coyle, 7 p.m., The Driver,
9 p.m., Modern Languages Building, Aud. 4.
Cinema Guild-All the President's Men, 7, 9:30 p.m., Old Architecture
Aud.
Cinema Two-Diary of a Mad Housewife, 7 p.m., The Apprenticeship of
Duddy Kravitz, 9 p.m., Angell Hall Aud. A.
Mediatrics-Casablanca, 7, 11 p.m., Petrified Forest, 9:15 p.m., Natural
Sciences Aud.
Gargoyle Films-The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly, 7:07, 9:59 p.m., 100
Hutchins Hall.
SPEAKERS
Center for South and Southeast Asiarr Studies-Douglas Paauw,
"Possibilities of Labor-Intensive Growth in Indonesia," noon, Lane Hall
Commons Room.
Urban and Regional Planning-Andrew Hamer, "Are Third World
Cities Structurally Different from Cities in Industrialized Countries: A
Comparative Inquiry," 1 p.m:, 2107-8 Art and Architecture Building.
Michigan Combustion Group-Richard Flagan (Cal Tech), "Laboratory
Study of Submicron Particles from Coal Combustion," 3:30 p.m., 107
Aerospace.
Nuclear Engineering-David Gilliam, "Absolute Fission Ratio
Measurements for Reactor Dosimetry," 3:45 p.m., 15 Cooley Building.
Vision Mound Institute-Dr. Frans Bakker, "Radical Healing," 8 p.m.,
3rd floor, Michigan League.
Department of Astronomy-Richard Teske, "What to Look for in Spring
Skies," 8:30 p.m., Angell Hall Aud. B.
MEETINGS
Undergraduate Political Science Association-Student and faculty wine
and cheese party, 3-5 p.m., 6th floor lounge, Haven Hall.
PERFORMANCES
Canterbury Loft-Poetry reading by Dennis Brutus, 4 p.m., 332 S. State.
Office of Major Events-Ted Nugent, 8 p.m., Crisler Arena.

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BILL MURRAY as Dr. Hunter S. Thompson-PETER BO
"WHERE THE BUFFALO ROAM" co-starring BRUNO KIRBY and
SiALTP ATTRDID TmThTC - Qn vnla'r c r .TOT-TAT VAVV

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