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April 09, 1980 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-04-09

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Page 8-Wednesday, April 9, 1980-The Michigan Daily
Celts optimistic about
lurtng 7-4 Sampson

Broncos kick

Blue nine

HARRISONBURG, Va. (AP)-Bos-
ton Celtics officials met last night with
the parents of 7-foot-4 college freshman'
Ralph Sampson and came away
optimistic they had offered enough to
make him sign a professional
basketball contract.
Sampson was not at the meeting. He
wasa some 61 miles southeast at the
University.of Virginia in Charlottesville
studying.
Harry Mangurian, owner of the
National Basketball Association team,
and Celtics General Manager Red
Auerbach spent more than two hours
with his parents, Ralph and Sarah
Sampson.
"It's up to Ralph now," said
Auerbach as they left the Sampson
dome in a driving rain.
Mangurian said it was the first time
in 30 years the Celtics have had the first
draft choice and want to make it count.
. Sampson, 19, whose intimidating
defense and his ability to shoot from

outside as well as in close took the
Virginia Cavaliers to the National
Invitation Tournament championship
last month,. must declare himself a
financial hardship case to be eligible
for the pro draft this year.
Asked if they thought Sampson would
elect to declare hardship, Auerbach
said, "I feel optimistic."
College Baseball
The ranking of the state's top 10
college baseball teams, as determined
by the voting of the coaches, with first
place votes in parentheses and records.
1. Central Michigan (12)......12-0
2. Western Michigan (2)......14-7-0
3. MICHIGAN (2)..........11-9-0
4. Michigan State (2).........4-12-0
5. Eastern Michigan ........... 1-16-0
6. Detroit .. ................ 7-11-0
7. Grand Valley ................ 3-1-0
8. Aquinas ...................... 54-0
9. Oakland..... . .... 4-2-1
10. Wayne State ................. 5-6-1

By BUDDY MOOREHOUSE
After one inning in yesterday's second game, the
dark and threatening clouds over Fisher Stadium
dumped buckets of rain, forcing cancellation of the
contest.
The Michigan baseballers probably wished the rain
had dropped a little earlier, considering the outcome
of the opener of their doubleheader.
At the conclusion of five innings of the first game
against the visiting Western Michigan Broncos, the
Wolverines held a comfortable 7-2 lead. But two
innings and three home runs later, Michigan found
themselves on the losing end of a 9-7 tally.
"YOU REALLY KIND of take it harder when you
lose after having such a big lead late in the game,"
said Michigan coach Bud Middaugh. "But you just
have to realize that whether you score early or you
score late, the runs still count the same."
The Bronco onslaught began in the top of the sixth
inning, when Middaugh replaced starting hurler
Scott Dawson, who had yielded only two runs all day,
with sophomore Tim Karazim. The first batter
Karazim faced, catcher Kevin O'Brien, drilled a
round-tripper over the leftfield fence.
The next Western batter, Tim Shearer, followed
suit and put the ball out of the park on the rightfield
side, cutting Michigan's lead to three.
The Bronco's Ray Sohn was not quite as successul

Three HR 's

key comeback
as his teammates, having to settle for a single off
Karazim. But he soon crossed the plate as the next
batter, Billy Heimach, drilled the third home run of
the inning over the left centerfield fence.
MIDDAUGH THEN decided that a pitching change
was in order, so Dave Nuss was called in and he
responded by striking out the next Bronco batter.
Freshman Steve Ontiveros then replaced Nuss, and
set down the final two Broncos to end the disastrous
inning.
Having cut their host's lead to one, the Broncos
added three runs in the seventh on singles by Joe
Rosenhagen, Shearer, Heimach and Ken Scarpace to
take the lead for good. Michigan threatened in the
bottom of the seventh, putting Jim Paciorek and
Gerry Hool on base, but neither was able to score, as

the Wolverines sufferd their first loss in the last five
games.
Middaugh attributed the comeback on the part of
Western to outstanding production at the plate. "It's
really a tribute to their hitters that they were able to'
come back," said the wet Wolverine skipper.
AFTER TAKING a 1-0 lead in the first inning,
Michigan gathered most of their runs in the fourth
inning. Hool started things off with a single and was
driven in by Garry Cawrych. John Young, the
designated hitter, was given a free pass prior to
Gawrych's single, and he scored on a beautiful bunt
by second baseman Jeff Jacobson. Centerfielder
Greg Shulte then lined a double down the rightfielad
line, scring Gawrych and Tim Miller, who was put on
base by a walk.
The Wolverines added two runs in the fifth, butf
Bronco hurler Jeff Kaiser, who replaced starter Tom
Kling in the fifth, remained stingy the rest of the way
and pickead up his fifth win on the year. Ontiveros
was saddled with the loss and dropped to 2-4.
The loss, only the second for Michigan since
coming north after their spring trip, dropped the
Wolverines to 11-9.

WMU..............001
U-M ..................o100
W-Kaiser

R H E
014 3 9 14 2
420 0 7 7 1
L-Ontiveros

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Blue cager Garris
transfers to Boston :.-

BY STAN BRADBURY
John Garris became the second
Wolverine cager this year to leave the
basketball program with his announ-
cement yesterday that he will transfer
to Boston College at the end of this
semester. Garris joins fellow
sophomore Keith Smith in leaving the
team prematurely.
"I'm transferring because I wasn't
getting as much playing time as I
thought I needed to develop. I'm hoping
that by changing schools I might be

I_

I

I

U

516 E.LIBERT AWN
Bored with studying?s
Try a release with
DITTILIES
Thru Saturday
\ iComing Sunday: SQUEEZE

able to play a lot more," said Garris, a
6-9 back-up center.
Garris, a native of Bridgeport, Conn.,
said that location also had something to
do with his decision. "It's not too far
from home, but it's far enough. They
also play a very competitive schedule
and they have a fine coach in (Dr. Tom)
Davis," Garris said.
Coach Bill Frieder said, "The biggest
thing with John is he really wanted to
play closer to home. He said one reason
he didn't play as hard as possible was
because he was a little homesick,"
Garris started five games at center
last year as he spent most of the season
behind returning junior co-captain Paul
Heuerman. Garris averaged 4.1 points
and 2.7 rebounds per game but led the
team in blocked shots with 34.
Former coach Johnny Orr said the
biggest problem with the play of Garris
was that he lacked intensity and
aggressiveness on the court. Orr
recruited Garris out of Bridgeport
where he was a nationally-rated
prospect.
Boston College is a member of the Big
East, which includes ,Syracuse, St.
John's, Georgetown and Providence.
Last season, the Eagles earned a trip to
the National Invitational Tournament,
defeating cross-town rival Boston
University in the first-round but falling
to eventual champion Virginia in the
second.
Garris, who said he never seriously
considered transferring anywhere else,
is taller than any of the returning
Boston College players. The Eagles will
be returning their center, 6-7 Joe
Beaulieu, for his senior year. But
Garris will have to sit out a year
because of NCAA transfer rules,
leaving him two years of eligibility af-
ter Beaulieu has departed.
As for Garris' ex-teammate Keith
Smith, the 6-0 Detroit native has
narrowed his choices down to San Diego
State and San Jose State. Smokey
Gaines, former head coach at the
University of Detroit, is the head coach
at San Diego State.

- .w - ..C Garris
..off to Beantown
Um a - ,

See the blonde over there..
Cincinnati Reds outfielders Dave Collins and Ken Griffey check out the
early arrivals in preparation of the major league opener in the.Queen
City. The usual throng of 52,000 is expected to see the Reds battle the
Atlanta Braves.
Beer war brewing in
Milwaukee Stadiumn-

The Department of Philosophy
The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
announces
THE TANNER LECTURE PROGRAM, 1979-80
April 9 & 10
ROBERT COLES
Professor of Psychiatry and Medical Humanities
Harvard Medical School
The Tanner Lecture on Human Values
"Children as Moral Observers"
Wednesday, April 9, 3:00 p.m.
Rackham School of Graduate Studies, The Lecture Hall
915 E. Washington, first floor
SYMPOSIUM
CHILDREN, MORAL DEVELOPMENT,
AND MORAL VALUES
Thursday, April 10
Rackham, School of Graduate Studies, The Amphitheatre
915 E. Washington, fourth floor

MILWAUKEE (AP) - A beer war is
looming for baseball fans here as
brewery workers fight the proposed
sale of out-of-state brew at the
Milwaukee County Stadium, home of
the Milwaukee Brewers.
The Milwaukee County Labor Coun-
cil, representing about 100,000 union
members, plans to protest a move to
start selling Minnesota-made Hamm's
beer at the Brewers' home opener
tomorrow. Only Milwaukee-made
brands - Schlitz, Miller and Pabst -

are now poured at the stadium, but the
Brewers recently announced that
Hamm's also will be sold at the
ballpark this year.
"It's almost an embarrassment to
bring 'foreign' beer to Milwaukee Coun-
ty Stadium," complained Ralph
Jirikowic, vice president of the labor
council
The name of the American League
club itself should make its management
want to stick by beers made here, said
County Supervisor Richard D.
Nyklewicz Jr., who sponsored a
resolution asking the Brewers to recon-
sider the proposal.
Labor leaders said the entry of
Hamm's could interfere with the jobs of
4,200 brewery workers in Milwaukee.

CLASS RING SPECIAL
MOONLIGHT MADNESS
FRIDAY, APRIL 11th; open until midnight
ROLL BACK GOLD PRICES
SAVP 30% off our regular
price on 14 Karat, yellow
gold class rings. At no addi-
tional charge, we will en-
- agrave your initials and
graduation year on the in-
side of the ring. Please
allow 10 days for the en-
graving.

SCORES

NHL Playoffs
Pittsburgh4, Boston 2
Islanders 8, Los Angeles 1
Buffalo 2, Vancouver 1
Montreal 6, Hartford 1

9:15 a.m.

Presentations of Comments:

MARTIN L. HOFFMAN
Visiting Professor and Executive Officer, Department of Psychology
The Graduate School of The City University of New York
CAROL GILLIGAN
Professor of Education, Laboratory of Human Development
Harvard Graduate School of Education
GARETH MATTHEWS
Professor of Philosophy
University of Massachusetts, Amherst
>>.nn ..... DAMT. TW T I OTAN

Affention
All Bookworms:
Now that your
midterms
pare over,
TAKE A
DDC A V I

I EAVEM avalmm

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