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January 30, 1980 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-01-30

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0

WOMEN CAGERS WIN, 89-86 IN OT:

The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, January 30, 1980-Page 9
FORMER SPARTAN CHOSEN

Blue d
By MARK FISCHER
Three last minute free throws
ovded the difference for Michigan
women's cagers last night at Crisler
Arena as they took a thrilling 89-86
overtime victory from a tough 11-10
Louisville squad.
A smoking Diane Dietz (15 for 26 from
the floor) led the Wolverines with 31
points, but in the end it was two
"quieter" players, Diane Hatch and
Brenda Venhuizen, who won it for the
home team.
WITH 50 SECONDS remaining in the
ertime period and the score tied at 86,
Dietz fed Venhuizen inside, where she
was fouled in the act of shooting.
Venhuizen's first free throw hit the rim

eals Cards a loss

and bounced off, but her second toss
filled the hole nicely, sending Michigan
ahead to stay.
The two teams then traded turnovers,
but Louisville missed its final shot, and
Wolverine center Penny Neer corraled
the ball and fired the outlet pass to Hat-
ch with only 15 seconds left.
Hatch then dribbled around until she
was fouled with only three seconds,
remaining in the game. Her two charity
tosses hit nothing but net, icing it for the
Maize and Blue. .f
The Wolverines' chances for a victory
did not seem good near the end of
regulation play, however. The nine
point lead that Michigan held over the
visitors midway through the second

half became a mere memory, as
Louisville pressed, out-rebounded, and
out-shoot their hosts to take a 78-72 lead
with only 40 seconds left to play. It was
then that Dietz went to work, hitting on
a driving, pull-up jumper and a 15
footer to pull her team within 2with just
21 seconds showing on the clock.
BUT THINGS still looked bad for the
Blue, as Louisville's Gayle Horstman
had a chance to double her team's lead
with a pair of free throws. Fortunately
for Michigan, she missed both,
whereupon Hatch pulled off a sen-
sational full court drive to tie the game
at 78 and send it into overtime.
The score in overtime remained close
until the final seconds. Louisville took
the opening tap and the lead on a lay-
up. But Michigan hung tough, backed
by three clutch jumpers by Dietz, the
third of which put the Wolverines out in
front 86-84. Louisville's Regina Carroll
came back quickly with a driving one-
hander to tie it up at 86, setting the
stage for the final three free throws by
Michigan.
The game too was close from the
start. Louisville broke to an early 6-0
lead, but the sharp shooting (56 per
cent) Wolverines battled back behind
Abby Currier's 16 first half points to
take a 33-30 lead at halftime.
IN THE SECOND half, Michigan
built their lead up to nine, but
Louisville, taking advantage of ,their
opponents' foul trouble (Currier, Katie
McNamara, and Tammie Sanders all
fouled out) crashed the boards again
and again, and took the lead with six
minutes left in regulation.
However, as Coach Gloria Soluik en-
thused, "This time the kids were just
not goting to give up."

MS Unames new coach
By United Press International
EAST LANSING - New Athletic
Director Doug Weaver made a stunning
reach into Michigan State's fabled foot-
ball past yesterday and pulled out
Frank "Muddy" Waters of Saginaw
Valley State College to succeed Darryl
Rogers as the Spartans' football coach. -
"This appointment is something I've --
dreamed of for 30 years," said Waters,
56, who at least once before applied to
coach at his alma mater but was turned
down. "I thought it had passed me by."
Waters is the patriarch of a football
family. He lettered at fullback from
1946 through 1949 at Michigan State and
a son, Frank D. Jr., was a Michigan
State wide receiver and running back
for the Spartans from 1966-68. Frank Jr. '
was on his staff at Saginaw Valley.
The announcement by Weaver ended
a search that began two weeks ago
when Rogers and Dr. Joseph Kearney,
the previous athletic director, fled for
jobs at Arizona State.
Waters was recommended by
Weaver, himself a Michigan State foot-
ball player, and approved by MSU API
President M. Cecil Mackey. Frank "Muddy" Waters, director of athletics and head football coach
Waters said his first task would be to Saginaw Valley State College, was named head football coach at Michiga
"put Michigan State football back on State University yesterday.
the road to success where it belongs,"
and said he would begin recruiting im-
mediately.
Waters leaves his twin job as athletic
director and football coach at Saginaw
Valley State College and brings a 30-
year record of 180-78-7 to the job.
Weaver praised Waters as "a proven
coach and one of the most respected
men" in the country. He also satisfies
Spartan cravings for one of their own. Se
"He is as Michigan State "as Spartan
Stadium and Beaumont Tower,"
Weaver said. "He has the character
and talent to attract character and
talent in coaches and athletes.
"I feel that Michigan state football Plenty of Variety
has never had a brighter future. I'm as -
3 excited as I was years ago when taking Inexpensive rices.
the field against Michigan for Notre
Dame," said Weaver. 2 , eny style

Photo
at
an
m.

Currier ........
McNamara ....
Neer ........
Dietz ..........
Hatch .........
Sanders ...
Venhuzen..
White .........
Team rebounds
Totals .........
Owens.......
McNew...
Baines ........
Burks .........
Smith .........
Carroll ........
Foree.......
Board .......
Pope ..........
orstman.
Team rebounds
Totals .......

Min
3
2
4
44
18

MICHIGAN.
n. FG/AFT/A1
6 9/18 2/4
8 4/10 5/6
!9 1/3 0/0
4 15/26 1/4
4 4/4 4/4
8 2/2 1/3
3 1/2 1/2
3 1/1 1/2

A.
2
0
i
2
0
0
1
0

PF
5
5
3
2
2
.5
2
2

Pts.
20
13
2
31
12
5
3
3
89

225, 37/66 15/25
LOUISVILLE
Mi. FG/A FT/A

6 28

SCORES

24
42
28
20
26
25
34
14
3
19

2/4
7/12
5/10
1/3
5/11
4/9
5/10
1/4
0/0
2/6

3/4
3/4
1/4
0/0
4/5
0/0
7/9
1 /2
0/0
3/8

A
0
0
0
1
1
2
1
0
0

PF
4
4
2
1
2
,2
5
0
3

College Basketball
Pts N. Carolina 71. William & Mary 61
Old Dominion 52, James Madison 44
17 Toledo 76. Dayton 75
11 Yale 86, Harvard 75
2 Fordham 64.Columbia 57
14 Shippensburg 64, E. Stroudsburg 63
8 Kentucky St. 67,Cumberland 56
3 Cedarville 91, Walsh 89
0 Duquesne 70, Indiana, Pa. 44
7 NBA
Golden State 111, Detroit 100
86 Atlanta 98, Washington 82
Indiana 133,Houston 112

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"

Daily Photo by LISA KLAUSI
DIANE DIETZ dribbles up the floor past Robin Board her counterpart from
Louisville. Dietz had 31 points, including a pair of clutch baskets in the
waning seconds of overtime last night, in the Wolverines' 89-86 victory over
Louisville.-x

300 6. Thayer * Next to the Bell Tower Hotel

225 32/69 22/36

5 24

NHL
Minnesota 2, New York Islanders 2

r . ,.

WARRIORS END LOSING STREAK

V

I

.Pistons oblige Golden St., 111-100

By DREW SHARP
Special to the Daily
PONTIAC-It was a battle between
the two worst teams in the NBA and the
Pistons showed why they are the ar-
mpit of the professional league by
losing to the Golden State Warriors, 111-
00, before a crowd of 5,212 at the
;lverdome last night.
The victory snapped a five game
losing streak for the Warriors. It was
the Pistons second consecutive defeat.
Guard Phil Smith paced the Warrior
attack by hitting a game high 26 points,
his season high, while Bob McAdoo led
the Piston scorers with 25 points.
The Warriors took the lead midway
through the first period and never
relinquished it, altough they gave it a

good shot by committing several tur-
novers. The Pistons, playing true to
form, however, could not capitalize on
the mistakes.
Golden State took control of the game
by scoring the first six points of the
fourth period and stretched their lead to
18 points, 97-79, the greatest point dif-
ference of the evening.
Leon Douglas had one of his better
defensive games of the season when he
swept the boards clean for 22 rebounds.
Terry Deurod had 18 points and former
Michigan State star Greg Kelser had 13
for the Pistons.
Coach Richie Adubato felt his back-
court did not perform up to expec-
tations.
"We were down ten at the halftime,"

SPORTS OF THE DAILY:
'Great Moment' not for Aaron

ATLANTA-All-time home run king
Henry Aaron, who snubbed an award
commemorating his record 715th
homer as "The Greatest Moment of the
Decade," added fire to the controversy
l3 sterday by claiming he, and not Pete
ose, should have been selected as
"Player of the Decade."
"I don't want this to sound like I have
anything against Pete Rose or his ac-
complishments, because I don't,"
Aaron said. "I. justfeel like what I did in
the '70s was in no way second best to .
any accomplishment of anybody, no
matter what they did."
SPORTS BROADCASTERS and
writers and baseball executives par-
cipated in the voting. Rose received
709 points, including 24 first place votes.
Rod Carew of the California Angels was
second with 103 points and 20 firsts.
Aaron was next with 86 points, in-
cluding 20 firsts.
Aaron blamed New York spor-
tswriters.
"I just think there were some people
in the press who didn't want to vote me
this award. I don't want to get into a
raeial thinev but T was never the ideal

he chose to sign immediately with the
Argos rather than wait for the Nationil
Football League draft because he felt
his speed and quickness made him bet-
ter suited for the CFL.
Bass, 21, was a Big Ten Conference
all-star last season and a second-team
all-America selection after he set a con-
ference record of 160 tackles in his four-
th year at Michigan State.'1Ae Lansing,
Mich., native also set a conference
record with a 99-yard touchdown on an
interception return.
Kush setles
PHOENIX-Ousted Arizona State
football coach Frank Kush settled his
multimillion-dollar suit .against the
school for $200,000 yesterday six hours
before a take-it-or-leave-it deadline.
Kush was suspended as coach last
Oct. 13 amidst charges he had slugged a
player and then had tried to coerce
other players and coaches into lying in
a coverup effort. He denied- both
charges.
THE STATE authorized the set-
tlement on grounds Kush's suit would

said Adubato, "If we could have han-
dled the ball properly, we could have
been up. It was a bad night for the
rookies. They all picked the same night
to have a bad one."
Smith took exception to the fact that
he plays well against the Pistons.
"I get hot occasionally but it happens
more often in' Detroit," said the five
year veteran from the University of San
Francisco. "I can't explain why but
I've been able to hit on Detroit
throughout my career."
The loss puts the Pistons even deeper
into the cellar of the Central Divison.
They now sport a 14-39 record-the
worst in professional basketball.
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