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January 30, 1980 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-01-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Page 8-Wednesday, January 30, 1980-The Michigan Daily

WCHA
Standings

i

North Dakota ......
MICHIGAN ......
Notre Dame .....
Minnesota......
Colorado College..
Wisconsin ........
Michigan Tech ....
Michigan State ....
Minnesota-Duluth.
Denver ..........

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WMPL Radio
Hockey Poll
Pts.
1. Northern Michigan (9) ..........99
Pct. 2. North Dakota (1).)........... 90
.722 3. Boston College.............72
.656 4. MICHIGAN .....................70
.556 5. Minnesota ......................54
.545 6. Clarkson ........................43
.523 7. Notre Dame ...................33
.500 8. Ohio State ......................30
.472 9. Tie: Vermont ..................17
.400 Providence ................17
.364 First place rotes in parenthesis.
.281

i7ti)

Drafting Tables and Boards
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Technical Pens
Luxo Lamps
MORE THAN A BOOKSTORE
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'I

Thursday
January 31, 1980
Dr. David Rosenbaum
Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, New Jersey
"THE STRUCTURING OF MOTOR PROGRAMS:
EVIDENCE AGAINST A HIERARCHICAL PROCESS"
MHRI Conference Room 1057
3:45 to 5:00 p.m.

Rejuvenated icers
By JON WELLS
" E'VE HAD SOME good goaltending, we've been
relatively injury-free, we've had an excellent
power play, good goal scoring. We've got a hard-working
bunch of guys."
If you've been looking for the inside lowdown, the in-
formed behind-the-scenes explanation of how the
Michigan hockey team has progressed from an 8-17-0
record at this time last year to their current overall
record of 19-5-1, you now have it, courtesy of Coach Dan
Farrell.
Well, there it is, the definitive explanation of winning
hockey in a very small nutshell. I've done my job, so
let's stop pucking around and move on to basketball or
wrestling or an analysis of the Blue spikers.
IN FACT, this reporter has always been ready to ad-
mit that team sports (with the possible exceptions of
cricket and team blow-pong) should not be subjected to
excessive intellectualizing; particularly ice hockey. By
the same token, it is certainly not the coach's job to ex-
plain why his team is winning, but simply to make sure
that it wins. Indeed, it is especially true of hockey that
games are not won or lost in the strategy room.
So the coach is off the hook and the sportswriter must
take over the task of verbalizing the considerable suc-
cess of Michigan's born-again hockey team; a group
that had trouble fighting its way out of the team bus only
one year ago.
The primary, and most easily discernible difference
between this year's team and the crew from last year is
the appearance of five fast, furious freshman forwards.
What they may lack in experience and maturity they
more than compensate for with a level of energy and in-
tensity normally associated with young Tazmanian
devils. When Tippett, Reid, Milburn, Speers, or Bruno
Baseotto jump over the boards the game seems to shift
into high gear.,
Slow but sure
BASEOTTO, the best known of the quintet because of
his 24 goals and 33 assists, is ironically the slowest
skater. Baseotto's hockey abilities are deceptive
however, and in many cases highly infuriating to the op-
position. With a strong stick and an uncanny nose for the
puck, the rookie right wing-center overcomes his
average to small size and his mediocre stride to become
an effective fore-checker and a consistent scorer.

. .. many reasons
Left winger Brad Tippett covers as many square feet
of ice during one shift as the ZaMboni covers between
periods. He's listed as 5-9, 170 in the program but seems
much larger when he wreaks havoc in the opposition's
corners. Tippett demonstrates on every shift what un-
diluted desire and high-level energy can do for a
linemate like Murray Eaves who knows exactly what to
do when he gets the puck on a regular basis.
ANN ARBOR'S own right wing, Ted Speers, is
probably the slickest of the five freshmen. He's fast and
fluid and a good passer. Although he began the season as
a part-time player, Speers has 17 points in 18 games and
should get more as he settles into the Eaves-Tippett line.
Muscle, not goals
Center Billy Reid and his linemate Joe Milburn are a
pair of bowling balls on the checking line with Captain
Doug Todd. At 5-8, 180, Reid spends most of his shifts
redirecting or upending opposition rushes with his body.
While the line of Reid, Todd, and Milburn does not
provide much scoring punch (32 combined points), they
usually accomplish what they are sent out to do: knock
the wind out of the other team's attack.
I guess when Farrell says, "We've got a hard-working
bunch of guys," he is referring to this fleet of freshman
fireplugs. The addition of these five forwards has injec-
ted a high level of energy into what was a lethargic
Wolverine offense that finished last in the WCHA in
scoring last season. Going into the Minnesota series last
weekend, Michigan led the WCHA in average goals per
game.
THERE ARE numerous other reasons for Michigan's
startling about-face this year. The fact that they have
the nation's leading scorer in soon-to-go-pro Murray
Eaves is one. The fact that Paul Frickercan turn away
89 shots in two games against Minnesota, the defending
NCAA champions, is another. Having a healthy Dan
Lerg who has found the range (56 points) and an ex-
perienced defense that plays the body and clears the
puck with relative consistency are certainly con-
tributing factors.
In the end, it seems, winning hockey can be explained
in prose, if not by the coach then by a spectator. Whether
Farrell's bland and brief appraisal of his team's com-
mendable turnaround reflects his attitude toward the
game or this reporter is irrelevant. The success of this
team is real and the reasons tangible.

"

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BER TONCIN FINDS ALL THREE

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Gymnastics: work, fun, success

WE'RE A
PRA " h
DEALER
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
318 S. State St., Ann Arbor, Ml
761-2011

PLYMOUTH
2755 Plymouth Rd. Mall, Ann Arbor, MI
761-8690

By KIM HANAFEE
Michigan top all-around gymnast,
Teresa Bertoncin, believes enjoying a
sport and having fun is a big part of fin-
ding success. She admits she "loves
performing" and her accomplishments
prove that.
First year Coach Sheri Hyatt has in-

T1 ~
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O a y>.
. E
4 US , ........
A "Can Do" attitude is apparent the moment you arrive in Austin. The Highland Lakes invite
you to enjoy a myriad of water sports such as skiing and sailing. Top-notch educational
facilities, including the University of Texas, staunchly uphold a tradition of excellence. A
positive outlook is everywhere..,.the Capital Building, the transportation system, the low cost
of living.. .it's a way of life in Austin.
We've developed the same approach at the Motorola MOS Division in Austin, challenging
electronics professionals to be the best you can be at what you do. And, one reason we're
among the leaders in the semiconductor industry is because we believe that "Yes you can," if
you try. As an electronic engineer, you'd find the environment at Motorola stimulating and
rewarding, much the same as the city of Austin.
The opportunities are now, so do something
positive. We will be interviewing on your
campus February 12. To arrange for your
interview, or for more information, please

stalled a workout format which has
been effective - the team has lost only
one of eight dual meets thus far. "-It's
(practice) a relaxed situation; Sheri
makes it fun," said Bertoncin. "I can't
wait to get to practice."
However, the vivacious Bertoncin
has not always had "fun" this season.
She was recently sidelined with a
hairline fracture of her right leg. The
injury occurred while practicing full
twists; repeated landings with her foot
turned inward created the sensation of
"instant shin splints" for Bertoncin.
Luckily though, the fracture is
calcifying nicely so it won't be long un-
til she's back on the floor. To keep in
shape, Bertoncin is swimming and
working out on the uneven parallel bars
minus the-dismount.
Staying tuned on the "bars" is impor-
tant since it's her best event. Team-
mate Laurie Miesel said, "She (Ber-
toncin) has really improved her bars
routine." Hyatt explained that some
new, high-risk tricks Bertoncin has ad-

ded to-her routine will earn an extra 0.3
points.
For Bertoncin the most nerve-
wracking event is the balance beam,
but she has worked hard to overcome
her fears. And with the beam as the last
event in meets, it "can make or break
you" according to Bertoncin.
Obviously Bertoncin and her team-
mates haven't been "broken" yet, con-
sidering their 8-1 mark. Nevertheless,
sparse crowds greet the successful
tumblers, which bothers Bertoncin.
"We put a lot of work into this," said
Bertoncin. Then she added with a grin:
"I perform better when people watch."
Bertoncin first encountered gym-
nastics at the local YMCA gym. On her
second visit, she was asked to try out
for the advanced gymnastics class by
her instructor. In six months she was on
the Y's team. Following that was four W
years at Steve Whitlock's School of
Gymnastics, one of the Midwest's best.
Today, eight years later, Bertoncin is
still hard at it - but having fun just the
same.

'k1jVRJSTY tVUS!CAL 8&XJETV pres en ts

11

Orpheus Ensemble
Friday, Feb. 8,8:30,
lRacham Auditorium

Fast becoming one of the most popular chamber orchestras in
k1--t A - ^*h .L,. s~i ncmilie rrcives glowing

I

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