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January 30, 1980 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-01-30

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Page 10-Wednesday, January 30, 1980-The Michigan Daily
ENTERTAINER REMEMBERED AS WARM, FUNNY:
Jimmy Durante dies at age 86

(Continued from PageI1)'
NONE OF Durante's family was
present when he died, hospital
spokeswoman Chris Thomas said. "The
family went home about midnight,"
said family spokesman Joe Bleeden.
However, he said Durante's wife,
nephews Bobby and Julie Romano and
actor Desi Arnaz planned to visit
Durante's body at Godeau - and Mar-
tinoni Funeral Home.
Dick Palmer, a spokesman for the
funeral directors, said a rosary and

Mass were scheduled Thursday
evening at Good Shepherd Roman
Catholic Church in Beverly Hills, with a
semi-private interment Friday mor-
ning at Holy Cross Cemetery.
He got his start in show biz as a piano
player in a Coney Island saloon at the
age of 17. After he achieved artistic and
financial success, he helped many
others along the way.
He earned a fortune during a career
that spanned the era from honky-tonk
joints to Roaring Twenties speakeasies

ENERGY.
We can't afford
to waste it.

to television. Friends said he gave most
of it away - to charitable causes, to
almost anyone with a hard luck story.
DURANTE SUFFERED a stroke in
1972 and was partially paralyzed. After
that he stayed pretty much to the con-
fines of his Beverly Hills home with his
second wife Margaret who survives
him. They had an adopted daughter
Cecilie.
A thin singer named Frank Sinatra
was among those he helped up the lad-
der of success.
"The world lost a great friend when
Jimmy Durante breathed his final
'Inka Dinka Doo'," said Sinatra. "He
came to my aid when I was just a kid
with stars in my eyes, just as he came
to the aid of a world looking for laughs
and songs and entertainment all during
his lifetime."
DURANTE'S trademarks - in ad-
dition to his prominent nose - were
such songs as "Inka Dinka Doo" and "I
Know Darn Well I Can Do Without
Broadway, But Can Broadway Do
Without Me?" He loved to interrupt his
own act by bellowing the catch phrase,
"Stop da music!"
He ended his TV shows with: "Good
night, Mrs. Calabash, wherever you
are." He once explained that Mrs.
Calabash was a reference to his first
wife, Maud, who died in 1943.
Durante starred in such films as
"Two Girls and a Sailor," "Ziegfeld
Follies," "Music for Millions" and
"The Cuban Love Song." His stage hits
included "The New Yorker," "Show
Girl," "Jumbo" and "Strike Me Pink."
DURANTE'S LAST regular show was
ABC-TV's "Jimmy Durante Presents
the Lennon Sisters," a musical variety
series introduced in the fall of 1969. Prior
to that, he starred in several series of
his own.
"You put a joke in modern dress," he
once said, "but the substance is the
same, just as people are the same
although the clothes they are wearin'
may be a diff'rent style. People like to
laugh, and I like to make 'em laugh.
That makes me happy, makin' them
happy. That's my life."

4

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REAGAN
for President meeting

Jan. 31

7:30 pm

Assembly Hall

Michigan Union
Reagan for President-gMichigan Division
P.O. Box 1526, Troy, Michigan 48099. (313) 643-6618
TAKE THE LEAD
Help New Students Discover
the University of Michigan
BE AFA;LL
ORIENTA TION
LEAqDER
Pick up applications at the
Orientation Office (2530 SAB) from
Mon. Jan. 28 to Fri. Feb. 22, 1980
*an affirmative action non-discriminatory emp/oyer*

Body recovered AP Photo
The body of a U.S. coast guardsman is pulled from the water by a recovery team after yesterday's collision of a coast
guard buoy tender with the tanker Capicorn near St. Petersburg, Fla. Four coast guardsmen have been reported
dead and more than 20 are missing.

I

01i

MID-JUNE CLOSING WILL AFFECT 3,500:
Youngstown steelworkers protest

Billiards
A Special !
rates reduced
14 am to 6pm
every day
at the Union

:

YOUNGSTOWN, Ohio (AP)-U.S.
Steel Corp. agreed yesterday to hold
,continuing meetings with union leaders
over plans to shut down its last two
plants in Youngstown, a union
spokesman said.
"They gave us a timetable for the
shutdown," said Robert Vasquez,
president of United Steelworkers Local
1330, which represents workers who
will lose their jobs when the plants close
by mid-June.
VASQUEZ WAS one of four union
local presidents who met in a closed-
door session with William Kirwan, U.S.
Steel's Youngstown superintendent,
and Charles Richards, superintendent
of personnel for the company.
The meeting came a day after more
than 100 steelworkers stormed into U.S.
Steel's local headquarters to protest
plans to close the mills.
The workers pushed their way into
company offices and roamed the halls
for several hours, seeking executives
who might listen to their requests. They
finally left at Vasquez' request. f
VASQUEZ SAID Kirwan told him the
company's reality division would put
together a portfolio that union and
community leaders could consider if
they want to buy the plants or any part
of them.

U.S. Steel announced Nov. 27 it would
close its Ohio Works and McDonald
Works in the Youngstown area, and
close or curtail operations at 15 other
mills in other states.
Steel industry layoffs are now ap-
proaching 10,000 jobs in the region.
They began in September 1977 with the
elimination of 4,100 jobs by Youngstown
Sheet and Tube Co. Jones & Laughlin
Corp. closed most of its operations here
in December, eliminating 1,500 jobs.
UNION OFFICIALS have mentioned
buying the U.S. Steel plants with the
help of a $100 million federal loan
pledged to the area in 1977 by the Carter
adminsitration for a "viable"
steelmaking project.
An additional $125 million in federal
loan guarantees, administered by the
Mahoning Valley Economic Develop-
ment Agency, has been offered for "in-
dustrial diversification," and 'union
leaders mentioned tapping that as a
money source for purchasing the plan-
ts.
"There may be a plan to lease a plant
with an option to buy," Vasquez said af-
ter the meeting. He said he had no idea
how much it might cost to take over the
plants.
"WE ARE examining an economic
cooperative between workers who

would buy shares, people in the com-
munity and area fabricators," Vasquez
said. "If we can get a commitment for-
60,000 tons of steel a month, w
probably can go with some plan.
A U.S. Steel spokesman said
representatives of its realty division
were in Youngstown yesterday to start
appraising the facilities. The
spokesman, who asked not be iden-
tified, said that after the appraisal the
division would see what the market was
for such property.
U.S. Steel's cuts are expected to af-
feet 3,500 workers, but a compano
spokesman said some of those would be
transferred and others, retired. The
company has never said how many
would be laid off, but has set a target
date of June 3 for completing present
orders and closing the mills, which
have operated since the late 19th cen-
tury.
U.S. REP. Lyle Williams, a
Youngstown Republican, has joined
steelworkers in a federal court suit
seeking to force U.S. Steel to keep it*
Youngstown plants operating.
The suit, scheduled for hearing in
Cleveland next month, essentially
alleges breach of a verbal agreement
by U.S. Steel board chairman David M.
Roderick. He was quoted several mon-
ths ago as saying the mills would not
close so long as they made money. The
company said they started losing
money last August.

1
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With Michigan Bell's newest
discount rates you can save
50% on direct-dialed Long Dis-
tance calls within Michig6n. Just
call any night between 11 p.m.
and 8 a. m. and weekends from
11 p.m. Friday till 5 p.m. Sunday.
You'll receive a 50% discount
from the day rate on the cost of
those great late-night and
weekend calls. Think about it!
The best times to call your friends
and family in Michigan are the
times that'll save you 50% dn
every Long Distance call you
make.
When you want to keep in
touch, don't hold back. Reach
out the Long Distance way -
and save.

HERNARDWELLS, LOVING AND CO.
Certified Public Accountants
Renaissance Center
will be on campus for the recruitment of all interested
and qualified students
Februty 4, 1980-Monday
Contact the Placement Office for details and to set
interview appointments.
764-1372

HELPUS
STRIKE OUT
BIRTH DEFECTS
MARCH
OF DIMES.

0

Calling Long Distance can cost you
5O0o/LESS!

I.q

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&
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Dunng the Evening Discount Period you pay 30*o less than the Day Full Rate Charge for

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An Evening with....
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