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January 26, 1980 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1980-01-26

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I

Page 2-Saturday, January 26, 1980--The Michigan Daily
"
Consumer prices soar in
biggest jump since 1946 osE
From APand UPI1

OLYMPIC BOYCOTT ENFORCEMENT CONSIDERED
Civile tti examines options

WASHINGTON - Consumer
prices soared 13.3 per cent last year,
the biggest jump since 1946, as in-
flation helped cut a workers' take-
home pay by more than five per.
cent, the government said yester-
day.
What's more, the Consumer Price
Index rose 1.2 per cent in December,
the largest monthly increase of last
year. And there are no prospects for
immediate relief, warned Alfred
Kahn, President Carter's chief in-
flation fighter.
KAHN SAID yesterday that 1979's
13.3 per cent inflation rate probably
will continue for a few more months,
but price increases should moderate
later in the year.'
Kahn, chairman of the Council on
Wage and Price Stability, said the
only solution is self-discipline by the
American people while the gover-
nment disciplines itself and
promotes savings, investment and
increased productivity.
"We have to have a leaner,
disciplined, more productive
society," Kahn told a hearing of
Congress'. Joint Economic Commit-
tee shortly after the consumer price
index for the year had been announ-
ced.
"IN THE coming months,
honestly, no one can promise an im-
provement."
He also predicted the price of food
will rise seven to 10 per cent during
1980.

In the longer run, Kahn cautiously
predicted better times, especially in
energy and home financing costs.
BECAUSE OF a favorable world
oil supply, the cost of energy should
stabilize during the year, he said.
Home mortgage .interest rates
should drop below tte double-digit
level about midyear, he said.
The inflation litany of 1979 in-
cludes these facts:
" Retail energy costs skyrocketed
a seasonally adjusted 374 per cent;
with a gallon of gasoline rising 35.7
cents and home-heating oil climbing
33.8 cents per gallon. The jump in
energy was the largest on record.
" Housing costs went ut 15.2 per
cent, also the largest rise on record,
the Labor Department said. Mor-
tgage interest costs alone shot up
34.7 per cent for the year and a
whopping 45 per cent from October
through December.
" Food and beverage prices rose
10.8 per cent, and after several mon-
ths of moderation soared by 1.,3 per
cent in December.
" Medical care was up 10.1 per
cent.
" Transportation costs leaped 18.2
per cent, with public transit up 39.4
-per cent during the last three mon-
ths of 1979, a distressing sign for
commuters and the elderly.
" Consumers paid about $2.30 in
December for the same retail item
that cost $1 in 1967.

El 30r-

-i -Y

25
205
L

Dec.
- 229.9
aest Period:
1967: 100
L iM1 AS H
,,,. ,,,

WASHINGTON (UPI )-Attorney
General Benjamin Civiletti, in a veiled
warning to the U.S. Olympic Commit-
tee, said yesterday the Justice Depar-
tment is considering options for enfor-
cing an American boycott of the
Moscow games.
"There are a number of options under
consideration," Civiletti told a news
conference.
IN EFFECT, he put the committee on
notice that if it attempts to defy
President Carter's expected call for a
boycott, the government will do what it

can to prevent U.S. athletes from going
to Moscow.
Sources said options being considered
include revoking athletes' passports or,
less likely, using the International
Emergency Powers Act to bar a
"renegade" Olympic committee from
paying their travel costs.
BUT HE SAID he has "no expectation
that it will be necessary," and predic-
ted the public, athletes and government
representatives will cooperate volun-
tarily with any final boycott policy.
In Colorado Springs, Colo., a
delegation of American athletes, com-

plaining they had become pawns in a
international political game, denoun-
ced President Carter's proposal
yesterday for a U.S. boycott of the 1980
Summer Olympics in Moscow.
The athletes, most of whom have
been training at the U.S. Olympic Cen-
ter for several months, said instead of
boycotting the games, the ad-
ministration should impose "total
economic" sanctions against the Soviet

Senate officials in
Washington talk
of war possibility

Dept. of tabor

Soure:

a

(Continued fromPage1)
Selective Service System. That, in ef-
fect, sets a limit on the amount of time
that the question of registering women
can be considered.
Levin was not supportive of the draft
registration proposal, although he was
somewhat less adamant about preven-
ting it than Riegle. According to
Serkaian, Levin was willing to take a
look at it but would hold off. "He feels
the system is unfair to minorities acid to
the poor. The system should be refor-
med before there is a draft."
AS FOR THE threat of war, he went
on, "There would have to be a terrible
breakdown in relations between the
United States and the Soviet Union

before war would become a serious
possibility. The ultimate would be a
break in relations."
Said Russell, "I don't think there's a
sense of imminency. We have to draw
the line if our Mideast oil supply is
threatened." He also said the United
States could expect help from her
allies, Japan and West Germany, both
of whom are very vulnerable to an oil
cut-off.
"A large number of phone calls and
letters are starting tn come in," he ex-
plained. "People would be willing to
accept the registration. But the draft,
that is something different.
Registration, that's okay, but the draft
is a serious matter."

Ci tileui

LtxI D I E~itCEU

- ... may revoke passports
Union. They noted the United States
had not shut off all grain shipments to.
the Russians.
Carter has said he will call for tran-
sferring, canceling or boycotting the.
1980 summer Olympics in Moscow
unless the Soviet Union moves troops
out of Afghanistan by Feb. 20.

AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
CENTER at FIRST BAPTIST
CH URCH
502 E. Huron St. (between.State &
Division)-663-9376
Dr. Jitsuo Morikawa, Minister
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service-Ser-
mon: "Being A Caring Christian In A
Time of Economic Uncertainty."
11:15 a.m.-1) A college class for
both faculty and students, led by Dr.
Nadean, Bishop..
2) An undergraduate campus class
for students only, a discussion with
three students as leaders. ,
Wednesdays at 7:30 p.m.-Campus
Discussion Group-Led by Margi Stu-
ber, M.I ., in the Campus Center
Lounge. r
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
132 Washtenaw ve.-662-4466
:Service of Worship:
Sunday 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
4:00 p.m. College Student Fellowship
in the French Room.
' Prayer Breakfast Wednesday at 7:00
"am. r
┬░mBble Study Wednesday at 4:00 p.m.
Theology Discussion Group Thurs-
:day at 7:00 p.m.
* * *
i ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
- ( fa thoiic )?
:331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekly Masses:
- Mon.-Wed.-5:10 p.m.
. Thurs. and Fri.-12:10 p.mn..
Saturday-7:00 p.m.
' Sunday-7:45 a.mx, 9 a.m., 10:30
a.m.,noon, and 5 p.m.
North Campus Mass-9:30 a.m. at
Bursley Hall, West Cafeteria.
Rite of Reconciliation - 4 p.m.--
- 5 p.m. on Friday only; any other time
; by appointment.
* *"*
' CAMPUS CIHAPEL'
1236 Washtenaw Ave.
, ,Fellowship Supported by the
> Christian Reformed Church
: ('lay ibolt
Service 10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.-
-Sermon title: "Looking For Commun-
_-ity," the worship leaders will be Clay-
ton Libolt and Glenda Prins.

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHIURCH
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
Worship Schedule:
8:30 a.m.-Holy Communion in th0
Chapel.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Morning Wor-
ship inthe Sanctuary.
Church School for All Ages-9:30
a.m. and 11 a.m.
Choir Rehearsal Thursday-7:15
p.m.
Ministers:-
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Education Director: Rose McLean
Education Asst.: Anne Vesey
* * *
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
Serving the Campus for LC-MS
Rovert Kavasch, Pastor
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
663-.5560
Double Sunday Services-9:15 a.m.
and 10:30 a.m.'
Sunday Bible Study at 9:15a.m.
Midweek Worship-Wednesday at
10:00 p.m.
* * *
CHURCH Oi CHRIST.
530 W. Stadium
(Across from Pioneer High)
Schedule of Services:
Sunday-Bible School 9:30 a.m.
Worship-1O:30 a.m. and 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday-Bible Study 7:30 p.m.
Bible classes for College Students.,
For information call 971-7925
Wilburn C. Hill, Evangelist
Transportation-662-9928
UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
TIlE NAZARENE
409 S. Division
Steve Bringardner, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Service of Worship-li:00 a.m
Time of Meeting-6:00 p.m.
* * *
ANN ARBOR FRIENDS MEETING
1420 Hill Street
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service.

NEWPORT FELIOWSHIP
( Free Methodist Church)'
1951 Newport Road-665-6100
Sunday School-9:45 a.m.
Worship-l11:00 a.m.
(Nursery and Chitdren's Worship).
Evening Worship-6:00 p.m.
Robert Henning, Pastor. 663-9526
t* * ,*
CHURCH OF SCIENTOLOGY
Iluron Valley Mission
809 henry St.
668-611:;
Sunday Service 2:3Q p.m.
Rev. Marian K. Kuhns
* * *
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHE RAN
CH URCH
(The Campus Ministry of the ALC-LCA )
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
10:30 a.m.-Worship Service.
Wednesdays, 7:00 p.m.-Choir Prac-
tice.
* * * .
WESLEY FOUNDATIN
at the University of Michigan
(313) 668-6881
602 E. Huron at State
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104
Rev. W. Thomas Schouiaker, Chaplain
Ann Laurance, Ann Wilkinson
This Week:
Sunday, 5:30 p.m.-Shared Meal.
Sunday, 6:15 p.m.-Worship Service
with special guest: Keith Pohl, editor of
"The Michigan Christian Advocate."
Sunday, 7:30 p.m.-Keith Pohl will
speak at a program on "China and Her
People."
Monday, 12:10 p.m.-Brown bag
film today. A free film and a great way
to have your lunch.
* * *
CANTERBURY LOFT
Episcopal Campus Ministry
332 S. State St.
Rev. Andrew Foster, Chaplain
SUNDAY COMMUNITY EVENTS
AT ST. ANDREWS CHURCH
306 N. Division
9:00 a.m.-University Study Group.
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service with the
Parish.
12 noon-Luncheon and Student Fel-
lowship.

Exxon profits increase55 per cent,
oil firm now largest industry in U.S.

From AP and t'PI
Exxon Corp. yesterday reported its
1979 profits rose 55 per cent and its sales
surged by almost $2o million, pushing
the oil .company past General Motors
Corp. into first place as the nation's
largest U.S. industrialfirm.,
Exxon's earnings of more than $4
billion in 1979 were attributed to an in-
crease in overseas oil producing.
refiring and marketing earnings, on top
of a steep rise in world prices.
EXXON, THE world's largest oil
c(ompany, yesterday reported fourth-
quarter earnings of more than $1.3
billion, up 60 per cent over last year's
figlire,and a net income for 1979 of
more than $4.2 billion, a 55 per cent
ga in.
Exxon thus became only the second
U.S. company to earn $4 billion in one
year, and the first industrial company
to do so. The American Telephone and

't'elegraph Co. earned more than 15
billion in 1978.
In a statement, Erxxon said its ear-
nings were justified because of the
large investment needed to generate
profits.
AMONG OI'THER oil companies
reporting higher income for the fourth
quarter and for 1979 were Standard Oil
Company of Ohio and Sun Oil Inc.
Sohio, the nation's 1lth largest oil
company, credited increased flow of
Alaskan crude at higher prices for its
fourth-quarter increase of 174 per cent,
to $451 million, and an annual increase
of 164 per cent, to $1.19 billion.
Sun, the 10th largest, reported four-
th-quarter earnings were up by 107 per
cent at $222.9 million, against $107.6
million a year ago.
IN WASHINGTON, meanwhile,
Senate and House conferees trying to
write a compromise "windfall" tax on
the oil industry adjourned yesterday

without reaching agreement. The tax
would be on extra revenue, not profits,
resulting from the Carter ad@
ministration's proposal to decontrol oil
prices.
About one-third of Exxon's 1979 ear-
nings gains came from a $320 million
reduction in British taxes.
But an "improvenwnt in margins in
most marketa" in Europe and
elsewhere as world oil prices nearly
doubled pushed Exxon's foreign
refining and marketing profits up by
110 per rent to $1.2 billion, excluding the
'ffects of the tax change.
Exxon also reported gains from oi
production in the No',th Sea and
Malaysia.
In the United States, oil and gas ear-
nings gained by 2.9 per cent to $1.5
billion, despite increased earnings prom
AlIjskan oil, as U.S. refining and
marketing profits slipped 62 per cent to
$113 million.

Iranians selecting new president

(Continued from Page l)
results are not expected before Mon-
day.
Carter administration officials say
they hope whoever emerges as
president will be a "better negotiating
partner" than Iranian officials have
been so far in international efforts to
win the release of the estimated 50
American hostages held by Moslem
militants at the U.S. Embassy. Yester-
day was the hostages' 83rd day in cap-
tivity.
DIPLOM \TIC contacts to end the
crisis are centered at the United
Nations, where Security Council mem-
bers were to resume private con-
sultations on the situation late yester-
day.
U.N. Secretary-General Kurt
Waldheim was trying to work out a
"package deal" whereby the hostages
would be released in exchange for a
U.N. investigation of the alleged crimes
of ousted Shah Mohammad Reza
Pahlavi. The embassy militants con-
tinued to insist, however, that they
would not free their captives until the

ex-shah, now living in Panama, was
returned to Iran.
Khomeini, who was admitted to the
intensive-care unit of a Tehran hospital
early Thursday with an undisclosed
heart ailment, cast his ballot at the
hospital, Tehran Radio said.
THE 79-YEAR-OLD Moslem
clergyman and his doctors have sought
to reassure the public that his illness is
not serious. Khomeini's office issued a
statement yesterday afternoon
congratulating the electorate on its
"revolutionary enthusiasm" and
urging even greater numbers to go to
the polls, Tehran Radio said.
l'ut it also quoted an Interior.
Ministry official as saying that "things
were not as they should be" in Kur-
distan. It said supervisory election
councils were not formed in the cities of
Baneh and Dastgerd, indicating boycot-
ts were under way there.
THe Kurds are one of several ethnic
minorities seeking greater autonomy
from Khomeini's central government.
THE AtPPARENT boycott by Shariat-

Madari, who like Khomeini resides in
the holy city of Qom, 100 miles south of
Tehran, may be equally imfportant
Shariotat-Madari has become
figurehead leader of the dissident
movement in northwest. Iran's Ater-
haijan region.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
(USPS 344-900)
Volume XC, No. 95
Saturday, January 26, 1980
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morn-
ings durng e University year at 420
Maynard Street; Ann Arbor, Michigan
48109 Subscription rates: $12 Septem-
ber through April (2 semesters) ;$13 by
mail outside' Ann Arbor. Somme.
session published Tuesday througW
Saturday mornings. Subscription rates.
$6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7.00 by mail out-
side AnnArbor. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POST-
MASTER: Send address changes to
THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard
Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

"W HY DO THE HEATHEN RAGE?"
Psalms 2:1 and Acts 4:25

"AND IN CONTROVERSY THEY SHALL STAND IN MY
JUDGMENT: AND THEY SHALL JUDGE IT ACCORDING
TO MY JUDGMENTS: AND THEY SHALL KEEP MY LAWS
AND MY STATUTES IN ALL MINE ASSEMBLIES: AND
THEY SHALL HALLOW MY SABBATHS." Ezekiel 44:24
Are we interested In God's judgments in view of the way we
learn and consider them? We ought to be inasmuch as we are
hastening to the Judgment Seat of The Aimightyt No telling
how many may read this article and shortly thereafter depart
this life for that Appointment God has made for us. That is
one appointment we will all keep and be on timel Are we
Interested in God's Laws and Statutes judging from the way
we have learned what they are and what consideration we
have given them? We ought to be interested for they will be
the basis of His judgment of usi Do we say we have accepted
Christ. loined The Church, been baptized, and there is

Many of us have not conquered the "love of lucre" enough
to Invest ten cents on the dollar in the business of God
Almighty! And many have not conquered their love of ease,
pleasure, sports, etc. enough to give God one day in seven as
He commands. But prefer golf to God, fishing to Faith, foot-
basket-baseball and boating and bathing and booze to The
Beatitudes of The Lord Jesus Christ In The Sermon on The
Mount, and then there are those who prefer cash to Christ
and so run their business on The Lord's Day for the sake of
profit: "What shall it profit a man if he gain the whole world,
and lose his soul?" Maybe the pronouns "THEE, THOU," a
little further on in the 11th chapter of Romans, versus 19-22,
come close to fitting us and getting our measure:
"Be not highminded, but fear, for if God spared not the
natural branches, take heed lest He also spare not thee.
Behold therefore the goodness and severity of God: On them

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