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January 26, 1980 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1980-01-26

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The Michigan Daily-Saturday, January 26, 1980-Page 3
SPAR TICISTS SPE AK ON AFGHANIST AN

SYL supports

Soviet presence

INTERVIEWS
LSA-SG GOVERNMENT IS INTERVlEWING to fill positions
on LSA-SG, MSA and several Student-Faculty Committees.
MONDAY, JANURY28
and
TUESDAY, JANUARY 29
Come to LSA-SG Office (4003 Union) for more info. and to sign
up for an interview.

By MITCH STUART
The Spartacus Youth League (SYL)
supported the presence of Soviet troops
in Afghanistan in a public forum at the
Michigan Union last night. Spokesper-
son Irene Rhinesmith said that the SYL
hoped to "expose (President) Carter's
war drive and defend the Soviet Union's
presence in Afghanistan."
The forum's featured speaker,
Joseph Seymour of the Spartacist
League Central Comittee, called Carter
ld National Security Adivisor
Zbigniew Brzezinski "crazy men who
are running this country, who have the
capacity to destroy the world many.
times over." ,
SEYMOUR SAID the SYL doesn't
necessarily support the motives behind
the Soviet troop movement. "The
motives of Soviet Union troops were not
altruistic," he said.
Rather, Seymour explained, the SYL
supports the social reforms which he
id the Soviet presence would bring as
side-effect.
A second organization, the
Revolutionary Worker's Group, caused
a slight disruption before Seymour
began speaking. A spokesman for the
Worker's Group said, "We defend
Soviet Union (troops) but don't give
support to bureaucracy, we don't say
'Hail Red Army."' "Haid Red Army" is
ohe of the SYL's new slogans.
BRUCE RICHARD, another SYL
' okesman, explained that the SYL and
the Worker's Group had come into con-
flict in the past. "They haven't done
very much. Basically, they've failed,"
Richard said.
SYL members claimed they had
received "several threatening phone
calls" yesterday. Some people coming
into the Kuenzel Room at the Union
were searched, they said, as a
"precaution."
In his address, Seymour contrasted
*e situations in Afghanistan and Iran.

He said that the American people were
"hot" on Iran and somewhat cooler on
Afghanistan. The U.S. government, he
said, felt just the opposite.
"AS FAR AS one can tell, Jimmy
Carter talks like he's going to start
World War III over Afghanistan," he
said.
Seymour said the results of the
situationin Afghanistan were threefold.
First, he said, although diplomacy
hasn't changed it has come to the sur-
face. He used what he said was U.S.-
China defense coordiantion as an
example. "Anybody who believes the
U.S. and China have just started coor-
dinating defeses believes in the tooth
fairy."
Second, Seymour said, Carter's
human rights stand has been affected.
He said the U.S. is not as harsh oi third
world countries as it has been in the
past.
FINALLY, HE SAID that the U.S. has
developed a "hate Russia, fear
Russsia, seige mentality."
On the possibility of reinstatement of
the draft, Seymour said, "In order to
have an army that fights you have to
have some sort of ideological commit-
ment."

Woody Allen's

1977

ANNIE HALL

Allen extended hiisdelightful comedy into regions of greater emotional depth.
Annie Hall succeeds on all levels-os good filmmaking, as fine acting, and
as intelligent, probing love story. Allen and Diane Keaton co-star in this
chronicle of a relationship between ,two loveable neuorotics. Oscars for the
film and Keaton. Short: QUASIAT THE QUACKADERO.
Sun: THE BOFORS GUN
Man: Hitchcock's PSYCHO

CINEMA GUILD

TONIGHT AT
7:00 8 4:05

OLD ARCH. AUD.
$1 .sa

J

7:00 9:05$1.5

1

Daily Photo by LISA KLAUSNER
JOSEPH SEYMOUR, a member of the Spartacist League's Central Com-
mittee spoke at a forum on Afghanistan last night and stated the Spartacus
Youth League's support of the Soviet presence in that nation. In his speech
at the Union, he referred to President Carter as a "crazy man."

presents
e DERSU U ZALA '°%
(Akira Kurosawa, 1975)
In this brilliant, Academy Award winner for Best Foreign Film of 1975,
Kurosawa brings us a great adventure story filmed entirely'on location in
Siberia, amidst beautiful thickly forested mountains and endless plains.
A Russian expedition trying tob chart and map this vast wilderness meets
Derso Uala-a hunter who becomes their guide and savior from near
disaster more than once. "DERSU UZALA has passages of tremendous
power and great warmth . . . an awesome portrait of man and nature."
Korosawa has once again created an endearing masterpiece!

Chrysler state aid outlook good

ANGELL, HALL

$1.50

tomorrow: THE SPY WHO CAME IN FROM THE

7:00 & 9:20
ECOLD

COLD

DETROIT (UPI)-Having won its
life-or-death battle for federal gover-
nment help, Chrysler Corp. appears
headed for success in efforts to win
financial aid from the states.
States where Chrysler is a major tax-
payer and employer and the city of
Detroit are considering financial aid
worth more than $250 million-the sum
Congress ordered the company to raise
from local governments when it ap-
proved a $3.5 billion rescue package in

State stalls medicinal
pot law, patient says

LANSING (UPI) - Michigan has
*.roken its promise to cancer and
glaucoma sufferers by delaying im-
plementation of a new medicinal
marijuana law, a glaucoma patient who
smokes pot daily said yesterday.
Robert Randall. a guest of the
Michigan chaipter 'of .t'he National
Organization for the Reform of
Marijuana Laws (NORML), said the
state Department of Public Health has
stalled details of prescribing pot for
medical use, a bill signed into law last
* 11 which-should have taken effect last
uesday.
"If I had to depend on the state of
Michigan for legal action for
marijuana," the Washington -D.C.
resident said, "I might well go blind
before I got the aid."
The state legislature almost
unanimously approved the medical pot
bill last fall following emotional public
hearings where cancer and glaucoma
atients pleaded for the legal right to
oke marijuana to ease their discom-
fort.
The compound in marijuana which
induces a "high'', called THC, is suc-
cessful in relieving unpleasant side ef-
fecFt from Cancer chemotherapy and.
also helps stabilize sight deterioration
and discomfort in glaucoma cases.
Dr. John Isbister of the health depar
tment - in charge of state andsfederal

health and drug enforcement
requirements for the medical pot
program - said Michigan's proposal
will be submitted to Washington within
a week, but would not predict when the
Food and Drug Administration would
give the go-ahead.
Randall -who wears thick-glasses to
ease his eye ailment - noted even when
medical pot is available the state may
not be able to obtain enough from
federal government and should use con-
fiscated marijuana to supplement its
stock.
Isbister admitted caches - of
marijuana taken by police could be
used medically, but said "no physician
would ever prescribe anything not
assayed for true content."
Although most medical marijuana
users smoke about four cigarettes each
day - about 2.5 ounces a week - Ran-
dall needs 10 joints daily to keep his
glaucoma in check.
Th THC content of government-
growh pot is double that available
illegally and a grinning Randall said
chronic use does cause one "un-
pleasant" side effect.
"I don't get high anymore," said the
former college speech professor who
now gives lectures advocating
medicinal pot. "After about a week of
10 joints a day you develop a toleran-
ce."

December.
TO :QUALIFY for $1.5 billion in
federal loan guarantees, Chrysler must
raise $1.43 billion on its own including
$250 million from state and local gover-
nments.
In some cases, state officials face in-
ternal dissent -and technical or con-
stitutioanl questions in their quest to
preserve jobs and revenue.
Chrysler is seeking help from
Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, Delaware,
Missouri, Illinois, New York, Alabama
as well as the city of Detroit. Specific
aid packages are advancing in many of
those states.
PROSPECTS THAT Chrysler will
meet the local aid requirement are
'very good," a company spokesman
said. "It's moving very quickly."
Michigan, Chrysler's largest client
state with 82,000 employees and a $24
billion payroll last year, is working out
the largest single rescue effort.
Michigan Gov. William Milliken
proposed a $150 million state aid
package, the bulk of that in the form of
a mortgage loan from state pension
funds onthe company's engine plant in
Trenton, which is being extensively
remodeled and retooled.
CHRYSLER'S MICHIGAN facilities
are concentrated in metropolitan
Detroit, which is considering building a
$28.5 million car painting facility ad-
jacent to Chrysler's Jefferson Avenue
assembly plant, presumably using a
federal grant for that purpose it hopes
to secure before the end of March.
Indiana, with 14,675 Chrysler workers
and six plants in four cities, is second
only to Michigan in importance to the
automaker.

A bill before the Indiana Senate
would provide Chrysler with about $32
million in loans from a pool of funds
assessed against the state's public
banks.
INDIANA BANKERS opposed the
measure on grounds of con-
stitutionality, but it won approval in a
Senate committee on a 12-1 vote.
Ohio has ear .marked for Chrysler up
to $15 million in loan guarantees from
the Ohio Development Finance Com-
mission. Chrysler has plants in six Ohio
cities.
In Delaware, where Chrysler has a
major assembly plant, a proposed $5
million package of loans and tax
deferrals is expected to win final sup-
port from the state legislature.
Chrysler's attempts to raise funds in
Missouri are hampered by the state's
constitutional ban on public financial.
aid to private business. Undaunted by
that provision, the state reportedly is
trying to pull together a $25 million loan
guarantee-mortgage arrangement.
The prospects for aid appar dimmest
in Illinois, which has no specific aid pr-
posal. An aide to Gov. James Thompson
siad the state has no statutory
framework for providing financial help,
but has encouraged Chrysler to submit
an aid request.
Chrysler said a $17 milion state-
assisted expansion of its New Process
Gear operation in Syracuse, N.Y. could
count toward meeting the local aid
requirement. The company also is
seeking $3 million in aid from Alabama,
home of its Huntsville Electronics
Division, but no concrete plan has
emerged.

TeAnn Arbor FIt? i Oper'St4'ePresents at MLB: $1.50
Saturday, January 26
STRAW DOGS
(Sam Peckinpah, 1971) 7:00-MLB 4
When coping with an ever-imposing modern world becomes too much to handle, a'young intellectual
returns with his English wife to her quiet home town to seek escape and seclusion. However, their
welcome is not quite what. they expected, and when the town bullies become increosin~ly belligerent
and dangerous, they learn that there are some things that you cannot run away from. 'STRAW DOGS
is about some guy who finds out a few nasty secrets about himself-about his marriage, about where he
is, about the world around him. Some people don't like facing that sort of thing. It makes them itch."
--Sam Peckinpah. DUSTIN HOFFMAN. SUSAN GEORGE, DAVID WARNER.
THE GRADUATE .
(Mike Nichols, 1967) 9:00-MLB 4
A classic American comedy about a college graduate who is "a little worried" about his future. After
being seduced by a family friend (ANNE BANCROFT) 8en falls in love with her daughter (KATHERINE.
ROSS)!A fine performance by DUSTIN HOFFMAN as Ben, Oscar Winning direction by Nichols and sound-
track by Simon and Garfunkel highlight a film that is as fresh no as it was in 1967.
Next Mondays Dusan Makevejev's LOVE AFFAIR at
Aud. A-FREE.
...a L.. r.... u! tl~ wry ww~ws _ ..a a. . ... . ..'

stn Avenue a liertyS t. 761-9700 I
Formerly Fifth Forum Theater
TIM DON ,
CONWAY KNOTTS
IN
A Knockout Comedy!
Sat, Sun-2:30, 4:20, 6:20, 8:10, 10:00
Sat, Sun-Adults $1 .50 til 3:00 (or capacity) C
Mon, Tues-6:20, 8:10, 10:00 $
Mon, Tues-Adult $1.50 til 6:45 (or capacity) -r*

b

Next Thursday: THE BEGGARS OPERA and THE MAGIC FLUTE

at Aud. A-$1 .50

FILMS

Alternative Action-Play It Again Sam, 7, 9 p.m., Nat. Sci. Aud.
Ann Arbor Film Co-op-Straw Dogs, 7 p.m., MLB Aud. 4; The Graduate, 9
p.m., MLB Aud. 4.
Ann Arbor Committee for a New Jewish Agenda-We Are All Arab Jews in
Israel, 7:30 p.m., Congregation Beth Israel, 2000 Washtenaw.
Cinema Guild-Annie Hall, 7, 9:05 p.m., Old Arch. Aud.
Cinema Two-Dersu Uzala, 7, 9:20 p.m., Angell Hall Aud. A.
Mediatrics-Muppet Movie, 6:30, 8:30, 10030 p.m., MLB Aud. 3.
PERFORMANCES
U-M Danco Co./Ann Arbor Cantata Singers-"The Unicorn, The Gorgon,
and the Manticore," 3, 8 p.m., Power Center.
School of Music-Javanese Dance Concert with University Gamelan En-
semble, 9 p.m., Hill Auditorium.
SPEAKERS
ACLU Forum-Mark Rilling, Michigan ACLU delegate to National ACLU
Board, "Inside the National ACLU Board," 8 p.m., 1006 Lincoln St., Call
Julie Carroll 662-6036.

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