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June 11, 1977 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1977-06-11

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Poge Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, June 11, 1977

Amin may execute alleged British spy

NAIROBI, Kenya (-) - Idi
Amin, frustrated in his efforts
to attend the Commonwealth in
London, threatened yesterday
to execute a former British
subject who reportedly once
carried the Ugandan dictator
atop his shoulder in a sedan
chair.
Amin also warned the nearly
300 Britons - already barred
from leaving the country -
they would be arrested if found
in groups of more than three
"and put into the nearest mili-
tary or other prison."
"The government is taking
this matter very seriously,"
said Amin's Radio Uganda.
"Security forces must watch
231 south state
[--7-------
STTTheatre Phone 642-6264
TODAY & SUNDAY AT
1-3-57-9 0Open 12:451

the imperialist movements and.
activities very seriously."
The British Foreign Office
identified the arrested 'white
businessman as Robert Scanlon,
who now holds Ugandan citizen-
ship. Radio Uganda said he
would be tried for spying and
would be executed by the end
of next week if found guilty.
Many observers believed
Scanlon's arrest and the har-
assment of British subjects
was an attempt by Amin to
humiliate Britain - the former
colonial power But Kampala
sources said Ctanlon renounc-
ed his British citizenship, which
would leave the London govern-
ment no formal basis on which
to intervene.
Radio Uganda described
Scanlon as a former manager
of Cooper Motors, Ltd., and a
former executive with the
Ugandan Transport Association.

The Kampala sources said
Scanlon was one of four British
residents of Uganda who car-_
ried Amin in a sedan chair to
a reception in 1975. Pictures of
the arrival were distributed,
worldwide.
Later Scanlon and other Brit-
ons swore allegiance to Amin
on bended knee.
"No announcement will be
made about the tine and place
of the execution, which will not
be made known to anybody,"
said the government controlled
radio. It also said the body
would not be handed over to
anyone.
The threat recalled a 1975 in-
cident in which a Ugandan
court sentenced British author
Denis Hills to death for calling
Amin a "village tyrant." The
61-year-old author was set free
after British Foreign Secretary
James Callaghan, now prime

minister, flew to Kampala to
negotiate his release, as Amin
had demanded.
Amin's threat to execute the
alleged spy escalated a war of
nerves that began after the
British government informed
Amin that, because of alleged
government ordered massacres
in Uganda, he would not be wel-
come at the London Common-
wealth summit or at celebra-
tions marking Queen Elizabeth
I's silver jubilee.
Despite the warning, Radio
Uganda reported Tuesday that
Amin had left for London, and
later broadcasts said he had
arrived demanding to be car-
ried through the streets of
England in a sedan chair by his
former colonial masters. British
officials insisted he was not in
the country.
Without explanation, Radio
Uganda changed signals Thurs-
day and announced Amin's
"safereturn" from "successful
talks with Tanzanian and Zam-
bian revolutionary military of-
ficers" near the border. The
same broadcast also revealed
the Briton's arrest.
In Lusaka, a Zambian For-
eign Ministry spokesperson

called the report of the meet-
ing "utter nonsense," addingg,
"Zambia does not associate it-
self with people whose actions
are atrocious."
There was speculation in Lon-
don and Nairobi-that the guess-
ing game on the Ugandan dic-
tator's whereabouts was an
elaborate hoax by Amin de-
signed to embarrass the British
in front of their fellow Common-
wealth members.
But a London newspaper, the
Daily Mirror, reported yester-
day that Amin begged Zairean
President Mobutu Sese Seko to
help him get to the conference.
The paper said Amin flew to
Kinshasa, Zaire's capital, on
Tuesday and asked Mobutu to
take him to France, where
Amin planned "to go by car to
a Channel port and hire a boat
to take him to England."
"But after consulting the
French government, President
Mobutu gove Idi Amin the
brush off," the paper said.
In Paris, Mobutu was asked
by a reporter whether the Daily
Mirror report was true. "I deny
it," Mobutu replied, but he
walked away without further
comment.

Understaffing suggested as
motive i. VA poisonings

Ii;
TODAY & SUNDAY AT
1 :00-3:05-5:10-7:15-9:20
OPEN 12:45
L'heatre Phone' 668-6416
TODAY & SUNDAY AT
1-3-5-7-9 Open 12:45
NOMINATED
FOR 3
ACADEMY
AWARD !

T (Continued from Page 1)
my pocket would know."
Narciso said syringes came
A nervous romance, in different sizes, and Yanko
asked how large a syringe was
needed to administer Pavulon.
"I NEVER GIVE Pavulon

without a doctor's order," she
replied.
Narciso and Perez are ac-
cused of causing multiple
breathing failures at the Ann
Arbor VA Hospital, during the
summer of 1975 by injecting
Pavulon, a powerful muscle re-
laxant, into the patient's intra-
venous feeding tubes. Narciso
is charged with one murder and
four poisonings, while Perez
faces three poisoning counts.
Perez will take the stand
sometime next week as the de-
fense's second witness in the
10-week old trial.
YANKO TRIED TO
imply guilt when he asked Nar-
ciso about patient John Mc-
Crery, bringing up Narciso's
statement made to the FBI in
1975. Narciso had told the FBI
that she pulled McCrery's cur-
tain a short while before his
breathing failure, and that it
might look "suspicious."
"Isn't it suspicious because
you did it for another reason?"
Yanko asked.
Yanko also brought up Nar-
ciso's previous statements to a
federal grpnd jury last year
that she ran when McCrery
flashed his call light for help.
"Isn't it true that you ran be-
cause you knew what was
wrong with him?" Yanko asked.

GEORGE CUKOR'S

ADAM'S RIB

1949

A delightful battle-of-the-sexes comedy with Spencer Tracy and
Katherine Hepburn as married lawyers on opposite sides of a case.
Written by Garson Kanin and also starring Judy Holliday.

I
I

SUNDAY FREE SHOWING
Murnau's NOSFERATU (at 8).
CINEMA GUILD TONIGHT AT
NE UILD7:30 & 9:30

. AUD.
i$1.25

OLD ARCH.
Admission

MAX REINHART & WILLIAM DIETERLE'S 1935
A MIDSUMMERS
rNIGHT DREAM
Delightful screen adaptation of Shakespeare's elfin comedy of.
the foolishness of love. James Cagney as Bottom, Joe E. Brown as
Flute, Olivia de Haviland as Hermia, Mickey Rooney as Puck.
Avant garde filmmaker Kenneth Anger's acting debut as a child
extra. A film just right for a long summer night,
TONIGHT AT ANGELL HALL-AUD. "A"
CINEMA I 7:30 & 9:30 Admission $1.25

DURING THE EXCHANGE,
defense attorney T h o m a s
O'Brien sat poised on the edge
of his seat, interposingtnumer-
ous objections when the pro-
secutor did not allow the wit-
ness to finish her answers.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVI, No. 29-5
Saturday, uane 11, 1977
Is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phe 764-0582. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arboriesigan 48509.
Published daily Tuisday throughs
MSunday morning during the Unliver-
ally year at 420 Maynard Street. Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept. tru April 12 semes-
ters); $13 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday moriag.
Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor: $7.50 by mal outside Alu
Arbor.

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