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August 11, 1970 - Image 4

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Publication:
1970-011, 1970-08-11
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Page Four

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, August 11, 1970

Tuesday, August 11,-1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Dial 662-6264

B
L
U
E
S
F
E
S
T
I
V
A
L

FUTURE UNPREDICTABLE:
Krasny discusses
university deaths

Corner State &
Liberty Sts.A
ENDS WEDNESDAY!

(Continued from Page 1)
sity will further aid this co-
operation.
"I have a great deal of respect
for Col. Davids," Krasny says.
"He should be an asset to the
University community in work-
ing out the problems which de-
velop.
"He's iot a guy with a short
fuse, and I'm sure he'll exercise
WORKING MOTHERS
AND STUDENTS
if enough response is.
shown a morning class
for children 3-5 will op-
erate this fall.
IF INTERESTED
call Perry Nursery
School--662-5591

Kellys Heroes
Teyhada
message for theArny:
Up thebrss!"
OPEN 12 45 Shows At
1:15-3:45-6:15-8:45

good judgment. He'll help us in
that I'll have confidence in the
man, since Te's a trained police
officer. This means he'll have.
different evaluations from the
lay person," Krasny adds.
So far this summer, Ann Ar-
bor has been relatively calm, in
marked contrast to last sum-
mer's violent disturbances on
S. University. But Krasny is not
Smaking any predictions for the
fall.
"The key to the issue is the
following that the so-called rad-
ical groups.might get," he says.
"Support for them was ebbing
by March last year.
"The normal thing that's been
developing over time we can
probably control, but a spon-
taneous outbreak, combined with
the rumor mill, is the biggest
danger we face."
Krasny says the University
administration' has helped keep
things cool by maintaining a
pipeline to various s t u d e n t
groups on campus and allowing
the students to occasionally win
their demands.

Governo
event I
LAKE OF THE OZARKS,
(A') --The nation's gover
voted yesterday to go to e
against the federal governs
to prevent highway construe
cutbacks. Earlier they
tracked a proposal fough
highway interests to ix
limited use of federal
funds for other types of ti
portation.
The vote on the court te
highway cutbacks came at
opening business session of
62nd National Governors .
ference.
The measure introduced
Gov. Harold Levander of
nesota, authorizes the cos
ence's executive committe
undertake court action agi
the legality of the federal
ecutive branch's decision
withhold part of the high
trust fund from the state
an anti-inflation move.
Some $300 million of the
billion earmarked for sper
this fiscal year has been v
held by the Nixon admini
tion, and a total of about
billion now is backed up dt
various mandatory and vc
tary cutbacks dating to
Johnson administration.
Earlier, the conference v
23-to-12 to send back to c
mittee the controversial
posal for a more flexible u,

Ed. Students Advising Office
COUNSELORS NEEDED
2 hrs." week commitment
Possible credit and/or money

Mama Thornton's going strong

Junior Wells and Buddy Guy enjoy playing

CALL: Marnie Heyn, 769-7353
Madelyn Campbell, 769-7683

or 2012 SEB
764-3503

FOR BLUES LOVERS in this country,
Christmas runs a poor second to the
Ann Arbor Blues Festival as the most
anticipated occasion of the year.
This year the line-up promised truly
outstanding diversity and quality that in-
cluded several Bluesmen who rarely per-
form in public anywhere else-much to
the loss of that public. Some of these
great musicians even had to be. paid in
advance so that they could patch up their
old cars well enough to get here.
But they did get here. For the second
consecutive year, in contrast to most "pop"
festivals, almost every artist promised in
the advance publicity appeared, plus sev-
eral unscheduled major acts.
And there were the Blues freaks, not
as many as last year, and evidently not
nearly enough to cover the festival ex-
penses, but if the crowd were measured by
their knowledge of and respect for the
blues instead of by simple numbers, then
it too would have to be considered out-
standing.
'T IS INEVITABLE that this year's
festival be compared to last year's and
given that the first Ann Arbor Blues Fes-
tival was very nearly perfect, it is just as
inevitable that anything measured against
it will- suffer somewhat.
B. B. King, Muddy Waters, J. B. Hutto
and James Cotton were missed by those of
us who saw them last summer. But added
to the bill this year were John Lee Hooker,
Bobby Bland, Lowell Fulson, Albert King
and several others.

The festival was kicked off Friday night
by Roosevelt Sykes, an artist who has be-
come a local favorite since his appearance
last summer. It now would seem inappro-
priate to begin a blues program any other
way.
But, John Lee's set had to be the one
that highlighted the evening. He has a
fantastic blues voice-very low, smooth
and serious. Added to that voice is a style
of alternately singing and narrating that,
so far as I know, isn't even imitated by
anyone else. I could have listened to him
for hours.
ONE OF THE very real problems of the
* festival was that there was too much
talent to be presented in the time allowed.
First let me say that if there is any good
reason why the City of Ann Arbor should
attach a 12 midnight curfew on.the fes-
tival, I haven't heard it.
But if indeed the festival must be oper-
ated within the unreasonable and ob-
structionist constraints of time imposed
by the city, then the organizers should
limit the number of performers instead of
asking each performer to limit himself to
an insultingly short thirty-minute set.
One of the victims of the time squeeze
was the final performer of Friday eve-
ning, the great Howlin' Wolf. There are
many unkind things that could be said
about Wolf. For one thing he intentionally
projects an image of the rowdy, drunken
Negro that has become so repulsive to
black people. But as a musician Howlin'
Wolf is one of the immortals. This year's

set was not quite as exciting as was last
year's when he rode on stage on a mini-
bike and stayed on for an hour and a half,
but it was' still great to see and hear him
again.
EARLY SATURDAY afternoon brought a
fine progression of traditional and
country blues. Lazy Bill Lucas played a
fine set, the highlight of which was prob-
ably his "Kansas City."
He was followed by Houndog Taylor who
played some of the best slide guitar of the
weekend. It was a very effective set due
largely to his selection of material, some
of which was unfamiliar, all of which was
infectious.
The afternoon concert was brought to a
close by the highly touted and very popular
Albert King. He delivered what I thought
to be a very disappointing set. To begin
with, he didn't play the songs I particular-
ly like to hear him do ("Born under a Bad
Sign," "Blues Power"). The guitar work
in the stuff he did play was at best medi-
ocre, repetitive and irritatingly uncreative.
And all of it was much too loud.
I GOT BACK in time to catch the excit-
ing performance of Johnny Taylor and
his band. At times Taylor may have been
guilty of playing rock, and roll instead of
blues ("Shake, Rattle and Roll") but what-
ever it's called, it was really great music.
Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson performing
with Big Joe Turner was awarded a stand-
ing ovation on the first number he did,
"They call me Mr. Cleanhead." I'm not too

Ed. Students Advising Office
COUNSELORS NEEDED
2 hrs.lweek commitment
Possible credit and/or money

Heavy Duty Steering
and Suspension Parts
* BALL JOINTS
* IDLER ARMS
" TIE ROD ENDS

IA NGC THEATRE CORPORATM
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375 No. MAPLE RD.-76943
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iMPT EON" m.

CALL: Marnie Heyn, 769-7353
Madelyn Campbell, 769-7683

or 2012 SEB
764-3503

DOUBLE FEATURE-STARTS WEDNESDAY

"CHALLENGES THE
HOLLYWOOD
SYSTEM!

Director Avakian is the
quintessence of a newly;
successful breed of
maverick, dropout film
maker. Their movies-
among them 'Easy Rider',
'Putney Swope', 'Medium
Cool, 'Last Summer'-
are all undiluted private
visions. They possess a
brutal honestyt"
-Life Magazin.

"ONE OF THE YEAR'S
10 BEST!"
--N.Y. TIMES
--CUE
-SAT. REVIEW
"Catherine Deneuve, she just
might be the world's most
beautiful woman!"
--TIME
"A REMARKABLE, FASCIN-
ATING FILM, ONE OF BU-
NUEL'S BEST!"
-HARPER'S
BEST PICTURE
VENICE FILM FESTIVAL
/Luis Bunuelbc Iasterpiece
of'Ertica!

p

AN uALLED LARTISTS I FILMI
No One Under
Cfldo~e czd } 8 Admitted
Saning
STACY KII, HARRIS MN, DOR 11 1 ANdJAMES EARL JONES
-GRAYSON AIl. ARAMAVAKIAN MAXLRAB TERRY OUTHEP>R'. PuE SEEN
VENNIS McGUIRE TERRY SOUTHERNARAM VA '"The Er of thRe o a d Aw N H ubV ' J 4COLOR

TOMORROW
Belle de Jour-7:15
End of the Road-9:OO

ENDS TONIGHT
fn new screen s lentfor The imost magnificent pictureever!
S EDAVID SEZNICK'S
~ i"'' .. rooUcTno, FMAGAHR f MITC11FUt

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PPrTH PrrUM
filF;T "iU FIFTH AVNUM A7 T L cRTY DWTW N QC
INFORMATION 761-70
ENDS TONIGHT
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"GONE WITH THE
WIND--7:30

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private parking free
garbage disposals
24-hr. emergency m
live-in resident man
See TOM WR'
or Answering

Music and dope filled the air.

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