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August 11, 1970 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
1970-011, 1970-08-11
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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, Poge Eig*itt

tHE MICHIGAt DAILY

PTuesday, August 11 1970

f

Tuesday, AugustI11,1970

0

THEMICIGNDAL

'

Tuesday. Augu , 1.97

I

Tuesday, August 11, 1970 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Congresswoman hits
new 'poverty' industry

By The Associated Press
PRESIDENT NIXON signed yesterday a bill extending un-
employment insurance coverage to 4.7 million more workers.
Nixon said the bill will cushion the move from a wartime econ-
omy to a peacetime economy.
Now covered for the first time are workers in firms with one or
more employes - the old test was four or more - additional agri-
cultural processing workers, employes of nonprofit organizations,
state hospitals, colleges and universities, including professors, and
county and municipal institutions, as well as some Americans work-
ing abroad.
The bill brings to 63.5 million the total number of workers cov-
ered, and provides extra benefits when unemployment levels are high.
* * *
SENATE BACKERS of a bid to restrain the Safeguard anti-
missile system said yesterday they see the omens of victory - a
41 victory opponents say would kill efforts to negotiate arms limi-
tations with the Soviet Union.
Senate Democratic leader Mike Mansfield of Montana told news-
men that while the race is still close, he believes the balance has
shifted to supporters of an amendment to hold Safeguard to the two
sites approved last year.
And Sen. John Sherman Cooper (R-Ky.) told a radio audience
that if the restrictive amendment he is sponsoring with Sen. Philip
Hart (D-Mich.) passes, it will do so by two or three votes.
An Associated Press survey taken late last week showed 50 sena-
tors either committed to or leaning toward a vote for the Cooper-Hart
amendment. Only 99 senators are expected at the balloting on the
amendment, now set for 3:30 p.m. EDT tomorrow.
* * *
IEAVILY GUARDED MUNITIONS TRAINS rolled out. of
Richmond, Ky. and Anniston, Ala. yesterday taking 418 con-
crete and steel jacketed vaults of obsolete nerve gas rockets to-
ward a burial at sea.
The Anniston train - its mechanical gas leak detectors backed
up by pigeons and rabbits - was loaded with 305 vaults as it left
a remote siding at a military depot near Anniston.
Army chemical experts made a last-minute inspection of the
train and a spokesman said "There are no leaks. It is about as dan-
gerous as a load of coal -- maybe less."

WASHINGTON (4P) - Rep.
.Edith Green has charged bil-
lions of tax dollars intended for
school children and the poor are
being diverted to private re-
search companies more inter-
ested in profits than results.
Much of the money goes to
private $100-a-day consultants
--including ,many former fed-
eral officials--who make stu-
dies which few people read and
fewer heed, says the Oregon
Democrat.
In the last five years, Mrs,
Green told a news briefing last
week, t h e industrial-poverty
complex has become a major
growth industry.
"Our most enduring monu-
ment to poverty has been the
creation of a 'poverty' industry"
which, Mrs. Green said, works
against the abolition of poverty.
if poverty were eliminated she
reasoned, so would be the lucra-
tive jobs of experts studying it.
Mrs. Green, the leading Dem-
ocrat on the House Eduration
and Labor Committee, said she
is investigating the practice of
hiring consultants from the
ranks of former high-level of-
ficials of the Office of Economic
Opportunity and the Office of
Education.
"Contracts have been given

with outrageous conflict of in-
terest," she declared, comparing
the education-poverty consulting
field with defense industries
which hire retired military of-
ficers for ranking positions.
And she ranked the threat of
the industrial-education-poverty
complex with that of the mill-
tary-indusrial complex which
the late President Dwight Eisen-
hower warned of as he left of-
fice.
"If I had my way I would end
all of the contracts with profit-
making institutions," Mrs. Green
said, because profit more often
is the goal rather than solutions
to the problem being studied.
"With the tremendous task
ahead in solving poverty, billions
are being siphoned off to profit-
making companies-and I ques-
tion the results," she said.
She suggested universities and
non-profit educational intitutes
could do much of the research
now farmed out by OEO and the
Office of Education to private
consultants.
Mrs. Green said her investiga-
tion shows the federal agencies
often do not know how many
contracts they have out, to
whom they are assigned, what
the subjects are, or whether they
duplicate others.

Daily Official Bulletin
The Daily official Bulletin isasa of-
fical publication of the University of
Micigan. Notices should be sent In
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 3328
L.S.A. Bldg., before 2 p.m.- of the day
preceeding publication and by 2 p.m.
Friday for Saturday and Sunday. Items
appear once only. Student organiza-
tion notices are not accepted for pub-
lication. For more information, phone
764-9270.
Day Calendar
Tuesday, August 11 -
Music for the Disadvantaged Student
Lect.: H. Henke, Obrn Coll., 2043 B4H.
of Music, 3:30 p.m.
Inst. of Gerontology - Conf. on Ag-
ing: "Roles for Older People - Pros-
pects for the 70's,,, Registration, Rack-
ham Lobby, 7 p.m. i
Degree Recital: Richard arber, trom-
bone, Sch r of Music Recital Hall,
pm.
Hairstyling
To Please
NOW 4 SHOPS
*ARBORLAND
*MAPLE VILLAGE
0 LIBERTY OFF STATE
L EAST UNIVr ATSO . UNIVT
THE DASCOEA BARBERS
- h
woyw
A three - piece Treasure Chest
chicken dinner, plus french fries.
Larqer take-home orders also. Try
a box soon!!
{sMILING S P£EDY ®ERVICE
West of Arborland_
Join The Daily Staff

,..;

Too

much

too

few

C

N. N

talent ...

TV RENTALS
$10 per month
FREE Service and Delivery
--NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED---
CALL:
Nejac TV Rent Is
662-5671
SERVING BIG 1OSCHOOLSSI NCE 1961

The people who came were nice, but there was room for plenty more.

Dial 665-6290
CAMPUS AREA J
603 E. Liberty St.

ENDING THURSDAY
SHOWS AT:
1:15-3:45-6:10-8:45 P.M.
Box office opens 12:45 P.M.

PA"INrYOUR WAGON.
Baed ()te kIAerm aH4 nd L w iw au Ipl

RAY WALMiN HARVE PRESNELL A O
SALAN JAYLERNER b~a JOSHUA L(XAN
miREDEBRICKIDEWE uIa.,ANDREPREVIN
+., ALAN lIY LERNER K NVos W WI NICOU A ~WMU IC'R MI

1*'-

School of Muisic and Department of Art
conductor-JOSEF BLATT
stage director-RALPH HERBERT
COMEDY ON THE BRIDGE
Bohuslav Martinu
GIANNI SCHICCHI
Giacomo Puccini's Hilarious Comedy
MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
AUGUST 14-15 517-18 at 8:00 P.M. Admission $3.00
TICKET INFORMATION: 764-6118
BOX OFFICE HOURS: Monday, August 10 thru Thursday, August 13
12:30-5:00 P.M. Open 12:30 to 8:00 P.M. Performance Days.
(Closed Sunday, August 16)
~U

familiar with most of the material he did
so I don't know how much he wrote him-
self but wherever they came from he sang
some fanstastic lyrics.
Next came another unscheduled act,
that of Pee Wee Russell. He took several
songs usually identified with the rhythm
and blues and adapted them to a blues
style. The result was interesting and
unique.
The evening was wrapped up by the best,
set of the weekend, The Soul of the Man,
Bobby Blue Bland. First let me say that
Bobby Bland won me over by simply se-
lecting some of my personal favorite blues
songs like "St. James Infirmary," "Save
Your Love for Me," "Lovelight," "Ain't
NothiA' You Can Do" and others.
THE SUNDAY afternoon concert started
in the same traditional country mood as
did Saturday's. First there was John Jack-
son whose style mixes "black" blues with
elements of white country music, the com-
bination makes for nice, easy-to-take
music.
The next two performers, Papa Light-
foot and Little Brother Montgomery con-
tinued in the same basic mood. Then Carey
Bell began the shift to more urban blues
with his set. Bell was followed by the out-
standing set of the afternoon as Buddy
Text by Alan Douglas
Photos by Sara Krulwich

Guy and his band backed up an unsched-
uled appearance by Junior Wells. Wells
was in what I will call rare good spirits
and he put on one hell of a show.
,LANCE LIPSCOMB opened the final
T1concert. The breadth of the influences
acting on his music was demonstrated by
his singing of "Rock Me" in three distinct
forms; two different traditional versions
and a more modern version.
The next-to-last act was Big Mama
Thornton. She was a tremendous hit at
last year's festival and reached even great-
er heights this year. She did her most
famous songs ("Ball and Chain," "Houn-
dog," "Lucky Old Sun") and got roars of
appreciation from her audience. Her little
back-up band was incredible, especially
her truly crazed bassist.
And then, finally, the weekend ended at
the beginr yng, the beginning being Sun
House. When he first walked on stage I
sensed the infinite age man. When he
spoke of his family, his background and
of the Bible it was with the voice of some-
one just barely this side of the grave,
But when he finally began to play it
was with the energy and rhythm °of a pile
driver. When he sang, he sang with a
power and intensity unapproached by any-
one else of any age. There was an urgency
in this man's voice that literally left me
gasping. Sun House sang more blues in
thirty minutes than everygone else appear-
ing last weekend will sing in their com-
bined lifetimes.

Ar

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141-

,_* " Irrrrunnrriyr rr OrIII r IMrllf rrrWr A

~OWL AAeWM#~y

1214 S. University
DIAL 8-6416

OPEN 6:45 P.M.
Feature Promptly
At 7-9 P.M.-

Sun House, more blues tha

ENDING WEDNESDAY
"BRILLIANTLY BITCHY" -TIME
"NOTHING SHORT OF BRILLIANT"
-JUDITH CRIST
"SCREAMINGLY FUNNY"
-JOYCE HABER
Spend a marvelous evening with eight of the boys.

Park
Terrace
848 Tappan
at Oakland
See Tom or Bonnie Woods
Apt. 10, 769-5014
or answering service, 769-7779

"the ultimate in campus living"
0 delux one-two-three bedroom apartments

Mdrt Crowley's
iltII4E ID"UN

* garbage disposals
* locked storage
0 resident manager

* fully furnished and carpeted
* private underground parking free
* 24-hr. emergency maintenance service

It's NOT a msical

C4bbD a'f

1 each apartment equipped with its own burglar alarm system

Luther' Atl soli, a bright star

Pete William's, .just sittin and pickir

e

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