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July 21, 1970 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1970-07-21
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4

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

A

0

Tuesday, July 21, 1970

Tuesday, July 21, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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news

briefs

dT T E
Corner of
State and liberty Streets
DIAL 662-6264
3 SHOWS DAILY
Open 1:45 P.M.
FEATURE AT
2 P.M. - 5 P.M. - 8 P.M.

wildcat strikers
hart financially

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R b 00$4 f0+ # iWf9. g t at c *', t * *1#*t *
B) The Associalcd Press V
A SOUTHERN DEMOCRATIC senator proposed sweeping
changes in the administration's welfare reform bill yesterday,
and voiced another warning that the proposals face rough going
in the Senate.,
Georgia Senator Herman Talmadge introduced a broad amend-
ment whose chief feature would provide tax incentives to private,
businesses hiring welfare recipients.
The Talmadge proposals, came on the eve of renewed hearings
by a Senate Finance Committee that so far has shown strong bi-
partisan hostility toward the administration package.
NATIONALIST CHINA is building air bases on Taiwan cap-
able of handling B52 bombers, apparently in hopes of strength-
ening the U.S. commitment to defend the island bastion, Sen-
ate testimony disclosed yesteiday.
Though officials disclaimed any connection with the project; a
State Department specialist on communist China said the base pro-
jects probably would raise apprehensions in Peking,
LONGSHOREMEN at two of Britain's paralyzed ports went
back to work yesterday to prevent troops from moving in on the
five-day-old nationwide dock strike.
The government has warned that troops will be used whenever
necessary to move perishable cargoes -vital to Great Britain, which
lives on imported food.
So far, however, no army units have been assigned to the dock-
yards since the walkout began last Thursday and Queen Elizabeth
proclaimed a state of emergency to permit the use of troops.
LT. WILLIAM (ALLEY JR., charged with murder in the
alleged My Lai Vietnamese village massacre in 1968, asked yes-
terday for a stop to general court-martial proceedings against
him and dismissal of the charges.
His attorneys charged that a trial by general courts-martial
would be a violation of his constitutional rights. They said Calley
should be tried in a civilian court.

Ass~oiated Press

Def eat at sea

Unis I n NE u IfAttitNIUHItN
y molo 1W8BINS
PMAVISI ow4
STARTS THURSDAY

CHARLESTON, W. Va. (A) -
A wildcat strike spreading
through the Appalachian coal
fields is costing miners an esti-
mated $300,000 daily in 1 o s t
wages.
It also is depriving the United
Mine Workers Welfare and Re-
tirement Fund, the target of the
strike, of an estimated $45,000 a
day in lost royalties.
The strike, in support of de-
mands for liberalized pension
benefits, is aimed at UMW
President W. A. "Tony" Boyle
rather than the coal mine ope-
rators.
More than 9,000 miners were
idle in southern West Virginia
and at one m i n e in Virginia
yesterday in open defiance of
more than t w o dozen federal
court restraining orders ban-
ning picketing at the mines.
Working miners joined dis-
abled miners and women on the
picket lines for the first time at
the start of the midnight shift
Sunday night as all mines in
Logan and Wyoming counties
were closed, along with some
mines in Boone, Raleigh a n d
Mingo counties.
Members of UMW Local 1355
at Osaka, Va., also voted to join
the walkout Sunday.
The strike was started by the
Disabled Miners of Southern
West Virginia in a move to im-

prove hospitalization benefits
for disabled miners and miners'
widows.
Industry sources said the 9.-
000 miners on strike resulted in
a wage loss of $315,000 a day at
an average wage of $35 per man.
The strike is cutting coal pro-
duction about 117,000 t o n s a
day, they said. With tle welfare
and retirement fund receiving
40 cents a ton, the loss there is
$46 800 a day.
Considering the business gen-
erated by supplies to the mines
and retail sales to mine families,
industry officials said, the idl-
ing of one-fourth of West Vir-
ginia's 40,000 miners costs the
state economy $2.5 million each
day.
U.S. District Judge Sidney L.
Christie is attempting to ar-
range a meeting between the
dissident disabled miners and
Boyle.
And his suggestion won praise
and support yesterday from U.S.
District Judge John A. Fueld
-in Charleston.
Christie's move 1 a s t Friday
sparked hopes that the pickets
would be withdrawn pending
receipt of a reply from Boyle.
The pickets were not in evi-
dence over the weekend, when
mostmines are closed, but were
back with more participants
than ever Sunday night.

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Capt. Christopher B. Castin
shakes hands yesterday with
tug Tamaran. The Fulvia s
None of the ships 721 passeng
1214 S. University
DIAL 8-6416
ENDS WEDNESDAY
DOUBLE FEATURE
_ _ _
LION IN WINTER
WINNER
ACADEMY
AWARDS
Including
KATHERINE
HEPBURN-
BEST ACTRESS
7 P.M. ONLY
_______PLUS
A SUSPENSE GAME
ABOUT TRUTH AND
ILLUSION .. .
"THE MAGUS"
w. MICHAEL CAINE.
and ANTHONY QUINN
9:10 ONLY

. w.... -v a7.... .....__ .., .. L_? : r. ._ ..s_ r_:_IL A.I

gs of the cruise snip ruivia (righut -
Capt. Juan Garrido of the Spanish RUR'A C
ank yesterday after a 36-hour fire. .
gers were injured. 20 E AET
DOUBLE FEATURE - STARTS TOMORROW
Ir
( N
V2
Emnuel,. t. Wolf presents
r ANLWED ARTISTSFIM
A Frank Psrry.Alsid Production ction
"BEST ACTRESS-GERALDINE PAGE"
-NationalBoard Of Review
"SNE OF THE YEAR'S 10 BEST."-Rx Reed
"MARVELOUS." :
- N.Y. Times :
"EXTRAORDINARILY
SENSITIVE. "-ca.
EmanueLL Wjfj s An ALED ARTISTS Film
TKA Mm bAN FRANK PENRY
= <;;:iI 'j' wi*JtC11SIDUfltYWN A I1Ni
F'IF'TH p'or-uM ends tonite
FIFH VENE T LBETY "F EMA LE AN IMA L"
INF~AToN 01-700 7:1 5 and 9:00-Rated X

-Associated Press
Harvey in wheelchair
Washtenaw County Sheriff Douglas Harvey arrives at circuit court
yesterday where has was scheduled to testify in the John Nor-
man murder trial. Harvey fractured his ankle in a motorcycle
accident earlier this month.

Congress to Increase
highway project costs
WASHINGTON (W) - Congress is special trust fund from which highway
poised to push the cost of the nation's construction is financed.-
web of interstate superhighways past $75 Rising inflation in construction bids,
billion - almost double the original plus changes to make the highways
pricetag. stronger, wider, thicker and safer than

SCORES DRUG ABUSE:

Mitchell

MICHIGAN REPERTORY' f
---university players--- 7
* TONIGHT *
steinbeck
OF MICE AND MEN "a maose p
NWY

r
i

WASHINGTON (W)

Two Cabinet

iece"

Lydia Mendelssohn
Air Conditioned

-N . . ime
Theatre 8:00 p.m.
Ph: 668-6300

lI

m

' v+.: i :ri: '.+fciY.,v!S3:x # ..<!k c ,..u.:.:.r.,ead' 'fik

LAST DAYS! DON'T MISS IT!
"'A I R PORT' is a great film all the way!"
-Chicao.Criby Howe
A ROSS HUNTER Production
AIRSqFOc3RT"
BURT LANCASTER DEAN MARTIN
JEAN SEBERG i JACQUELINE BISSET - GEORGE KENNEDY
HELEN HAYES - VAN HEFLIN - MAUREEN STAPLETON
BARRY NELSON; LLOYD NOLAN AVSAJ. *ictut,; T TCO.
DANA WYNTER - BARBARA HALE
603 E. LIBERTY ST.
.- v --w
EI -DIAL & &Q 1:05-3:45

/-

GET YOUR MAn WITH A

5-6290
BOX OFFICE OPENS 12:45

6:30-9:05

A planned $5-billion hike will push the
pyramid of stunning overruns beyond the
$25 billion America spent to put men on
the moon.
Yet it will be at least another six to
eight years before men can drive across
the country on superhighways stretching
unbroken from coast to coast.
The original 1972 deadline for com-
pleting the 42,500-mile system begun 14
years ago is now set to be shoved back
by Congress to 1978. Some skeptics say
the program won't be finished before
the 1980s,
Any day now, however, actual spend-
ing will pass the $41 billion once esti-
mated as the total cost of the system.
The mounting costs mean the special
federal tax of four cents a gallon on
gasoline, now due to expire in two years,
is virtually certain to be extended to
1977 or 1978. This tax goes into a
Legion
hits black
amissionl
The Michigan American Le-
gion condemned the University's
committment to enroll 10 per
cent black students by the
school year 1973-74.
The legionnaires blasted the
University for yielding to the
demands of minority groups.
They also called on the legis-
lature to pass a law "providing
immediate discharge of any uni-
versity president - or board of
regents who allows such de-
mands to be met."
The University last A p r i l
committed itself to providing
funding and supportive services
that would enable 10 per cent of
the University's enrollment to
be black by the school year
1973-74. .sa

first planned, have caused much of the
escalation in costs.
The originally planned expenditures
thus buy fewer miles of highway, bring-
ing delays that allow costs to rise even
more, resulting in new stretching out of
the program.
The House Public Works subcommittee
on roads is putting its final touches this
week on a new highway bill that will ear-
mark a bulging $5 billion more than fed-
eral officials said is needed.
Congressional sources consider the ex-
tra $5 billion a realistic sum to meet the
current inflation that highway officials
haven't yet acknowledged.
The Federal Highway Administration's
official estimate of the full cost of the
interstate system was sent to Congress
this year at $70 billion. But the FHWA
based the estimate on construction prices
in effect two years ago.

officers urged Congress yesterday to
quickly pass drug-control legislation-cit-
ing an epidemic of drug abuse by the
young.
Atty. Gen. John N. Mitchell contended
the no-knock provision of the admin-
istration package has been widely mis-
understood, and would not authorize
police to break into private residences at
will.
Mitchell told the House Ways and
Means Committee "quick entry" would.
be a better name for the provision under
which agents could get a warrant allow-
ing them to enter premises unannounced
if a judge found such action was needed
to avert the probability of destruction
of evidence or danger to life and limb.
Mitchell said use of no-knock as a
catch phrase in news media has led to
erroneous interpretations, but "without

a
no-knock an
but gives the
to destroy
time."
Rep. Cha:
committee m
threat of a
might bring
from foreig
drugs origin
United State
"As far as
concerned, a
tive action t
portation of
where else, w
replied.
He said TV
source of ille
States "has
road" of cor
Do
con
lab4
Fro
don
Ra
Dr.
loft
cor
Pa

I

I

No N TEATRE CORPORATION
N ~W A NATIONAL GENFRAL COMPANY
Playing FOX VILLaGE
375 No. MAPLE RD.-769-1300

MON,-FRI.
8:15 Onlv
SAT.-SUN,
1:45-5:00-8:30

A FRANK McCARTHY-
FRANKLINI.SCHAFFNER
PRODUCTION

SUBSCRIPTION OFFICE
I Open Tuesday and Thursday, 10-1 and 2-5

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