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July 16, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-07-16
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Harrison
trial begins
on July 24,
T. R. Harrison, '73, was or-
dered yesterday to stand trial
on charges of assault with intent
to commit great bodily harm
short of murder. The charge was
in connection with an alleged
incident which occurred on
March 19, when students clash-i
ed briefly with police following
the Regents' meeting on thel
Black Action Movement de-
mands.
The case will be heard in Cir-
cuit Court by Judge Pieter
Thomassen. Preliminary hear-
ings in the trial will begin July
24 at 8:30 a.m. on the sixth floor
of City Hall.
During yesterday's p r e t r i a l
hearing, Harrison's lawyer, Mor-
ton Leitsen, attempted to have
defense witnesses called, but'
Thomassen, citing the fact that
testimony had previously been
closed, refused to allow the wit-
nesses to be called. He said he
believed that the prosecution
had established the fact that aj
crime had been committed withI
the possibility t h a t Harrison
had committed it.
Audio-Visual Ed. Center Films -
Deep Sea Trawler -- The Japanese &.
Miners of Bolivia: Multipurpose Room,
UGLI, 7 p.m.
Comm. on Institutional Cooperation
(CIC) & Center for So. & Southeast
Asian Studies - Lect. on Change &
Persistence of Tradition in India - J.
D. M. Derrett, of London, "Tradition in
Modern India: The Evidence of Indian'
Law": Rackham Amph., 8 p.m.
Dept. of Speech: Michigan Repertory
'70 - Merchant of Venice: Lydia Men-
delssohn Theater, S p.m.
Degree Recital -- C. Veazey, oboe:
Sch. of Music Recital Hail, 8 p.m.
Ecology Film Festival - America: A
New Synthesis - Pandora's Easy Open
Flip Top Box (HEW) - Above the Tim-
berline (NFBC) - Cosmic Zoom (NF-
BC) - You Are On Indian Land (NF-
BC) - The Ravaged Earth (NBC) -
The Rat Problem (HEW) and Beyond
± Conception (rated X Pop Dyn): Archi-'
(Continued on Page 7)

4- 4' 1 1

Thursday, July 16, 1970
Fleming speaks to
campus unrest panel

Thursday, July 16, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

0

Negotiation
at Generali

(Continued from Page 1)
explained that due to Michigan's
unique trimester, no makeup
time could be budgeted and
thus, students could not be
given time off for political cam-
paigning in the fall.
In addition to a change in
party images, Fleming also call-
ed for "An unwavering, com-
pletely credible, and rapidly- im-
plemented commitment tc end
the presence of our troops in
Vietnam, and, a major yoGmmit-
ment of state and federal. funds
to assist minority group stu-
dents.
Fleming also said he was en-
couraged by signs that univer-
sity disciplinary codes are being

revised-this is happerng at
the University-and that ad-
ministrators are bec)ming "more
sophisticated" in dealing with
unacceptable conduct.
Faculties which are, he said,
"notoriously toleran;," are com-
ing to see the more destructive
youth as "totalitarians w h o
think they are possessed of a
new truth from which deviation
is not permitted."
The commission, named by
Aixon last month in the wake
of student deaths at Kent State
University and Jackson State
College, is charged with making
recommendations by Oct 1 for
easing campus tensions.

-Associated Press
Chains for plants?
They're chaining down the plants in New York's Central Park.
It's not that the plants are walking away, but plenty of people
have been, and taking the plants with them. The plan is to attach
a chain to a shrub or tree before it's planted and then shackle it
to a stake, which is sunk underground..

LAST DAYS! DON'T MISS IT! j1
"'AIR PORT' is a great film all the way!"
- Chicago Daily Newt
A ROSS HUNTER Production
Akl R 1 R
i,...BURT LANCASTER -DEAN MARTIN
JEAN SEBERG - JACQUELINE BISSET - GEORGE KENNEDY
HELEN HAYES - VAN HEFLIN - MAUREEN STAPLETON
BARRY NELSON - LLOYD NOLAN A" '; .
DANA W YNTER - BARBARA HALE [: - 3 :45
5-6290 6:30-9:05

-Associated Press
UAW PRESIDENT LEONARD WOODCOCK, left, reaches across the bargaining
table and shakes hands with Earl Bramblett, GM's head negotiator, in the tra-
ditional ceremony at the start of negotiations in Detroit yesterday.

Will Smith
talks about
'U' ,change
(Continued from Page 3)
"The concept of experienced-
based learning is foreign to
many people outside the Univer-
sity," said Smith.
"The public is in dire need
of being educated to the posi-
tive things that are happening
on campuses today. There is
a need for far more effective
ways of making the public
aware of what's happening on
campuses today.
"When people learn through
the media of isolated incidences
of disruption on campus," he
continued, "they get a distort-
ed picture of the true situation
because the incident is viewed
out of context,.
Smith emphasized that if
people outside the University
were aware of everything that
was happening, the people with-
in the University could spend
more time on their jobs and
less time explaining their ac-
tions.
The administration is defend-
ing itself to the public," he ex-
plained.
After tomorrow, Smith will
go to the University of Cali-
fornia at San Diego where he
will become the Dean of Stu-
dents.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan, News phone: 764-0552. Second1
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sIty year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5. by carrier, $5 by mail.
BACH CLUB
-the place to meet
INTERESTING people
presents
PETER DEWITT
teaching fellow, doctoral student
in Organ performance
speaking on
Italian contemporaries
of Bach
refreshments & FUN afterwards
CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 MAYNARD
EVERYONE WELCOME!
(No musical knowledge necessary)
Further info:
663-2827, 769-2003

Daily Official Bulletin
Day Calendar
Thursday, July 16
Art Conference & Exhibition: E. Ja-
como, Alma College, "Ham and Eggs of
Art;" W. E. Tall, painter and art critic,
Detroit Free Press, "Where Dil Art Go,
Anyway?" Rackham Lect. Hall, 10:00
a. m. Walter Chapman, watercolorist,
author & art director, Phillrpps Asso-
ciates, "Portrait Demonstration" Guy
Palazzola, Professor of Art, "Still Life
Demonstration" & Lois McBride, paint-
er, designer and teacher, Grand Rap-
ids, "Nature Through the Eye of the
Needle" (art stitchery): Physics-As-
tronomy Bldg., 2 p.m.
Music for the Disadvantaged Student
Lect.: W. Pritchett, Philadelphia, Choir,
lecturer: 2043 Sch. of Music, 3:30 p.m.

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FRI and SAT. JULY 17 and 18
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Ui

Rege nts to
By ROB BIER Studer
The Regents will be in town this present
afternoon and tomorrow for their which, i.
monthly meeting with the major item ally esta
on the agenda being final approval dent Se
of the 1970-71 budget and fee seed- and SG
nearly a
wle. t
"We will ask that there be no new whether
fee increase," Vice President for board si
Academic Affairs Allan Smith said. ions whi
"As for the budget, the Regents may vice pre
want to take it home and look it over The R
for a week or so before giving final ed such
approval." by-law
Tomorrow, the Regents are also ex- merely s
pected to give final approval for the policy bo
center for Afro-American Studies and, the two
at their closed morning session, will itself ou
be discussing The Daily, possible tak- final by
ing some action in connection with At ton
it. will rece
At the open hearing this afternoon posal tl
at 3 in the Regents' meeting room, Mosher-,
four student groups are expected to year and
make presentations. Gay Liberation sot up a
Front (GLF) is hoping to address the
Regents for the first time to explain TheR
their aims to them. nounce
Fauri, dE
The Board of the Martin Luther Fthe d
King Scholarship Fund is expected state re
to question the role of Vice President the deat
Smith on the board and ask for a take ove
definition of how it may use its money.
PROBE, a group of female graduate Annou
students, plans to present a statement the liter
asking that the new vice president for Presently
student services, when chosen, be a school,I
woman. the dean

meet,

DfUi''t

nt Government Council will
a proposed temporary by-law,
f passed tomorrow, could fin-
ablish the new Office of Stu-
rvices (OSS). The Regents
C have been deadlocked for
a year over the question of
the proposed OSS policy
hould be able to make decis-
ch are binding upon the OSS
sident.
egents have steadfastly oppos-
a move, and the temporary
would avoid that issue by
etting up a vice president and
ard. The relationship between
would be allowed to work
At and the result put into- a
'-law a year from now.
morrow's meeting, the Regents
eive for consideration a pro-
;hat the co-ed corridor at
Jordan Hall be continued next
3that another such corridor be
t Alice Lloyd Hall.
egents will also formally an-
the appointment of Fedele
ean of the social work school,
position of vice president for
lations, the post vacated by
h of Arthur Ross. Fauri will
r the new office on Aug. 1.
ncement of an acting dean for
rary college is also expected.
Y, associate dean of the
Alfred Sussman, is handling
's duties on an informal basis.

DETROIT (AP - The United A u t o
Workers, opening contract bargaining
with General Motors yesterday, said an
unlimited cost-of-living allowance for
UAW members would be a top demand
at GM and the other Big Three auto-
makers.
Leonard Woodcock, UAW president,
said wage hikes based on increases in the
cost-of-living would have the effect of
"braking" constant escalation of straight
wage rates.
GM called on the union to get down
to serious bargaining right away, and the
UAW replied it was agreeable to a speed-
up time table in negotiating sessions.
The UAW opens bargaining at Ford to-
day and Chrysler tomorrow. Current
three-yeai contracts covering about 730,-
000 workers at the Big Three automakers
expires at midnight, Sept. 14.
In addition to a return to the unlimit-
ed cost of living allowance ineffect from
1948 to 190~7, the UAW's demands in-
clude a substantial wage increase, early
retirement with $500 monthly pension
after 30 years of service and additional
money for Supplementary Unemploy-
ment Benefit (SUB) funds.
Woodcock did not, put a price tag on
the UAW's demands in his hour and 15-
minute session with the GM bargaining
team, led by Earl Bramblett, vice presi-
dent for personnel.
The union has said, however, it ex-
pects to get more than the 15 per cent
pay hike it gave its own staff workers
over a two-year period.
The Big Three estimate they spend
about $4.02 in wages and another $1.75
in fringe benefits per hour on the aver-
age autoworker. A 15 per cent increase
over $5.77 would cost the Big Three about
$1.26 billion.
After meeting with Bramblett, Wood-
cock said, "We agreed t h e settlement
should be noninflationary."
But he indicated the definition of "non-
inflationary" would be subject to debate.
The union president, who took over
May 22 replacing the late Walter Reu-
ther, said military spending and the Viet-
nam war were the prime causes of in-
flation, "not the relation between the
UAW and General Motors."
"We can reach a noninflationary,
equitable settlement and we can do it
without a strike," said Woodcock. "It
would bekthe greatest contribution we
could make to our sorely troubled coun-
try."
"We want to return to basic Wilsonian
principles - C. E. Wilsonian principles,"
Woodcock quipped in emphasizing the
union's demand for complete cost of liv-
ing protection in new contracts.
It was the late Wilson as head of GM
who first negotiated cost-of-living for
hourly rated workers in 1948, and full
protection was included in UAW con-
tracts with the Big Three until 1967,
when the union agreed to an eight-cent
hourly maximum limit annually.
Woodcock said no dollar or percentage
figures were discussed with GM officials,
but he said several high wage settlements

in the con
brought to
GM offi
proposals :
them in al
ed to disc:
include.
Immedia
ing; Brami
eration in
demands w
Toward
the parties
can get do
work out a
fair to eve
After th
talks "seer
.,.abett
Irving
Woodstock
said he ex
proposals 1
days. earli
dei
of1
BERKEL
Panther R
FBI Direct
that the
sponsible R
in America
year.
"What H
defense,"
Hoover's
to June 30
a "record
continue to
inent whit
in a statemr
the most r
support frc
York."
"I think
toward wh
toward the
Bard will b
of making
Nixon diir
last Nov. 15
CharlesdC
thers, said
impossiblef
a fair trial.
He said
with the sta
Black Pan
in New Ha
"Everythi
by design,"
Hoover a
the Black
be the most
of all extre

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I

WILL SMITH

'The people affected should be in,

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By LINDSAY CHANEY
As he prepares to leave the University,
Acting Director of the Office of Student
Organizations and Assistant to the Act-
ing Vice President for Student Affairs
Will Smith explained how he felt the
University could be improved.
"I feel there is a tremendous need for
organizational changes in the Univer-
sity," said Smith. "The structure of the
University makes it impossible for the
administration and students to develop
the trust needed to solve the problems
of this campus."
Smith specifically attacked the r i g i d
structure of the University administra-
tion by which decisions are made from
the top down.
"There should be more involvement by

people who are directly connected with
the problems in articulating answers,"
declared Smith. He explained that any
area that has problems should look to
the people directly involved for the solu-
tions.
Smith commented that "one of the
major obstacles to involving the people
directly concerned with the problems is
that the procedure for doing so has not
yet been formulated."
"Not enough time is being spent form-
ulating ways by which the people who are
affected by problems can be involved in
solving them," said Smith.
Smith also attacked as futile the at-
tempts by numerous reform committees
to specify new procedures and organiza-
tional channels..

"Changes may look fine on paper, but
they'll never work unless you involve the
people who are going to make the system
work-the clerical workers, staff, and
students-in the decision-making pro-
cess," he said.
"The University Council is an example
of positive change," he said, "if they
can realize that their answers are ex-
perimental and final answers on paper
are not possible.
Smith also commented on questions
related to how much the University could
be influenced by outside interests such as
alumni, the state Legislature, the Re-
gents, and the public.
"The Gay Lib movement brings out
the question of to what extent the Uni-

versity shou
of interests
posed to stt
Smith ex
way as a c
the Univers
mine how
should be m
to what exi
dice of ou
howaeducat
available to
Smith str
word "how"
He explaine
people outs
as "disrupti)
educational
See

330 Maynacrd

769-5436

/

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