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July 16, 1970 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1970-07-16

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4

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Thursday, July 16, 1970

Aj

I

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

e £tigan Da1t
420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Mich.
Edited and managed by students at the
University of Michigan
Editorials orinted in The Michigan Daily express the individual
opinions of the author. This must be noted in all reprints.

cinema
A middle-America flick

For Direct Classified Ad Service, Phonie 76
12Non eadineMonday through Friday, 10:00 to 3:00

THURSDAY, JULY 16, 1970

News Phone: 764-0552

New anti-crime bill
IF CONGRESS PASSES the administration's "anti-crime"
bill as it was reported out of a Senate-House conference
committee Monday, a policeman will be able to burst in-
to your house unannounced. If he arrests you, and a judge
considers you to be a "danger to society," you can be held
in "preventive detention" for as long as 60 days before
your trial.
Upon the third felony conviction you automatically
receive a life sentence. If you feel you have been wronged
by the system, you can always sue for false arrest - but
you will pay the legal costs of the policeman you charge
-even if you win your case.
The bill presently before the Senate and House ap-
plies to only the District of Columbia, but the adminis-
tration designed the proposal as a model for the whole
nation. And its approval by the conference committee is
considered a major victory for Nixon and his "law and
order" campaign.
THE BILL, which also includes a limited wire-tapping
provision, effectively eliminates individual privacy.
The "no-knock" provision allowing police to enter unan-
nounced if notice is likely to endanger the life of the po-
liceman and the provision obligating the plaintive to pay
the attorney's fees for policemen charged with false ar-
rest establish the nation's police forces as the adminis-
tration's own Gestapo-like force free to pursue its work
with virtual impunity.
While the bill provides the government with a dan-
gerous instrument of repression, its potential effective-
ness in lessening crime is dubious. Nixon's "anti-crime"
proposal ignores completely the conditions of poverty,
ghetto dwellings, p o o r education and inadequate job
training and placement programs--especially prevalent
in Washington, D.C. - that breed the crime he is sup-
posedly so concerned about.
THE BILL'S PROPOSED higher-paid, tenured judges
empowered to impose stiffer jail sentences enter the
scene only after a crime has been committed, and the in-
adequacies of this deterrent philosophy of crime preven-
tion have already been made obvious by the ineffective-
ness of the present capital punishment laws.
Nixon's "anti-crime" proposal is inhumane and repres-
sive. It is also racist. The white administration has chosen
a city with a 70 per cent black population as its first tar-
get in a nation-wide campaign of repression.
The bill is expected to pass the House. Unless the
Senate takes a stand to block it, Nixon's racist policies of
repression will be "legally" established in Washington,
D.C. as a blueprint for the rest of the country to follow.
-ERIKA HOFF

By DREW BOGEMA
When you play the movie mo-
guls' game and take a chance upon
a mainstream, middle-American
flick, what do you do when the
thing is a hype. Do you walk right
out and sneer at the pretty girl
selling concessions? Do you just
fall asleep until the debacle is
over? Do you daydream away? I
mean like, what do you do?
It's no secret that Airport-that
action-charged, t e n s i o n-filled,
emotionally-depraved, hype of the
year- has been playing at the
Michigan Theatre for eight con-
secutive weeks. Why has it been
running for eight consecutive
weeks?
Well, who knows? It is because
Ann Arbor is not only one of the
hippiest, freakiest community in
the Midwest, but also a community
paradise for the redneck and the
bourgeoisie? Could it be that just
like you or I sometimes visits the
plastic Fox Village Theatre out
Stadium, the rednecks-thinking
that this is a free country-in-
vade theatres like the Michigan or
the State whenever MGM or Fox
try to get in good with the public
and stuff family entertainment
down their throats?

Well, maybe, it' could be. Some-
body told me the other day that
all the theatres around Ann Arbor
-- meaning the Michigan, the
State, the Campus, and, even the
University Drive-In, were owned
by this guy Butterfield. It figures
that once money gets tight and
the kids stay away from your
movies like the plague, that may-
be you ought to change your audi-
ence, cultivate a new clientele, like
they say in the-trade.a
When was the last time you saw
an outasight movie at one of these
Butterfield theatres? Zabriskie
Point, maybe, or Easy Rider; or
Alice's Restaurant, or The Ballad
of Cable Hogue? Were these really
the movies you enjoyed more than
anything else in the world? If
they were, that's cool as Peter
Fonda might say, but if they
weren't maybe everybody ought to
all get together and figure out
how they can get the capitalist
distributor Butterfield to start re-
presenting the_ people's interests.
But, wait. The people have al-
ready done all this and they even
show movies once and a while.
They show movies at Canterbury
House and Cinema Guild and
Cinema II and at, the Ark and
there are even places in Wash-

tenaw County like the Washtenaw
County Film Library where an
average-Joe like you or me can
take out movies, projectors and
screens free. You can see things
like the Red Balloon, early Chap-
in movies, a couple of W.C. Fields',
or maybe if you like to travel, they
have good travelogues. You don't
have to sit around and wait for
good stuff to come to town be-
cause maybe the money-makers
Twill decide like who are you?
I'm only saying that if you're
dissatisfied with the fact that
Airport has been here for eight
weeks and there is nothing else
worth seeing, well what can, you
do? I went to- see Airport and
fidgeted two hours in my seat
while I waited for it's thrilling
climax to a close. It's the type of
movie you can tell if you like it by
the cast, whom I won't mention by
name, but you know those people.
Anyway, good luck to ya, but if
you want to see a real good movie,
you might try Cinema Guild this
Friday and Saturday when they
play The Big Sleep with Hum-
phrey Bogart which is a killer. I
mean, that's if you want to be
subjective about it -and not lose
your objective eye.

FOR RENT
MEALS, LAUNDRY, FRIENDSHIP, TV
at Osterweil Peoples Co-op, $52/mo.
761-6084.
OSTERWEIL PEOPLES CO-OP
21048
TV RENTALS-Students only. $10.40/
ma. Includes prompt delivery service,
and pick-up. Call Nejac, 662-5671.
27Ctc
AUGUS TOCCUPANCY
A delightfully spacious, quiet, clean 2
bedroom furnished and unfurnished
apartment for 3 or 4. Campus area,
ample closets. storage and parking.
Cali on Resident Manager, Apart-
ment 102, 721 S. Forest. Ctc
NEAR MEDICAL CENTER
1035 walls St.-Furnished, new, modern
efficiency, 1 and 2 bedroom available.
1-864-3852 or 665-7273. llCtc
1 OR 2 NEEDED to take over lease for
Sept.-May. Beautiful bi-level. Call
769-7467 after 5. 25045
NEWLY Panelled single rooms for men,
3 blocks from Engin. Arch. Available
now. 663-5930. 26C45
FOR FALL-Modern 2 bdrm. furnished,
A/C apt. in remodeled old house. 2
blks. from Law School. $290/mo. All
utilities included. NO 2-2466. 28C48
711 ARCH
-Near State and Packard-
Modern 2-Bdrm. Apts. for
Fall, $260/mo.

Letters to .the Editor

Collier's
To the Editor:
I read with great interest the
article about the fraudulent prac-
tices of Collier's Encyclopedia
(Daily, July 10). Six years ago my
husband and I bought a set of
Collier's in California under just
the sort of arrangement Lindsay
Chaney describes. Every year
since then we have paid $3.95 per
year for the yearbook.
This April we- received their
yearly inquiry about our present
address. Among the various en-
closed ads and brochures was a
form letter asking us to pay $4.95
this year-out of a sense of fair
play, as their costs have gone up.,
The actual bill, which arrived
about a month later with the year-
book itself, made no mention of
the dollar increase. It simply listed
the amount due as $4.95 plus 20
cents tax. Only by accident would
anyone have ever noticed that
form letter among all the ads in
the envelope.
I sent $3.95 plus 16 cent tax,
and have heard nothing more.
-Linda J. Hubbel
Ann Arbor, Mich.
July 13

\\
I ~-7
...y.How e .

. q
t ,
r,
;I
. -;'-
:.
11'Itttttr. , .,

W Dishwasher
Balcony
* Air-cond.
i And much more
Close to campus
Phone 761-7848 or 482-8867
Y
FURNISHED-FALL RENTAL

1 and 2 Bedroom Apts.
1111 S. State
1506 Packard
1-864-3852. 353-7389 or
761-2366 after 5.

1.

18Ctc
12Ctc

CAMPUS
NEW, FURNISHED
APARTMENTS
FOR FALL
DAH LMANN
APARTM ENTS
545 CHURCH ST.
761 -7600
38Cto
Summit
Associates
CHOICE APARTMENTS
STILL AVAILABLE
FOR FALL

FOR RENT-
2 BDRM. FURN. units on campus.
avail. for fall. McKinley Assoc., 663-
6448. 5Ctc
2 BbRM. FURN. units on campus,
avail. for fall. McKinley Assoc., 663-
6448. 50Ctc
APTS. LOCATOR, $12.50, Summer and
Fall, on and off-campus. 1217 S.U.
761-7764. 22048
Campus-Hospital
Fall Occupancy
Furnished Apartments
Campus Management, Inc.
662-7787 335 E. Huron
47Ctc
911 S. Forest
Near Hill St.-Modern 2 Bdrm., 3-man.
668-6906. Fall. 14Ctc
Apartments
l Limited
ONE AND TWO BEDROOM
APARTMENTS FOR FALL
663-0511
761-5440
50Ct
WANTED TO RENT
2-MAN APT. room with kitchen Priv,
about $100/mo.mCall 761-8627. 31L50
DO YOU NEED someone to fill your
funky old house, near campus for the
fall? I want to. Please call or phone
Stan. 761-9766. 2L47
3 Bedroom House
Wanted by 4-5 grad students for fall.
Please call 761-5d78 or 761-7839. 20L49
WANTED: Furnished Apt., I or 2 bed-
rooms, A/C, Univ. Prof. attending
ISR 7/28-8/21. Write Dr. Cohen, C/O
Lucksen, 1176 Lydig Ave., Bx., N.Y.
10461. 19L47
HELP WANTED
MATURE student or couple wanted to
take care of professor's infant and 3
yr. old Aug. 13-15 and the infant
Aug. 29-Sept. 5. 761-8838. 13H50
LOOKING FOR A JOB?
Talented or experienced or interested
in a particular field? Try placing a
Michigan Daily "BUSINESS SERV-
ICES" or "PERSONAL" ad-and help
a job find YOU. HDtc
GOLDsmith's services desired. Cali 769-
6852. Keep trying. HD48
HELP WANTED-The Ann Arbor Ten-
ants Union is seeking a full time
paid office worker, for late summer
and to continue thru school year.
Call 763-3102 or 764-4404 for more in-,
formation. 9H46
HELP WANTED for Mike Stillwagon, 30
yr. old former poverty lawyer now
(running for Congress. Straight or
freak - anybody welcome. Call 769-
3288 or drop in 2004 Traver Rd. 10H53
TIME'S UP for the Nixon-Agnew-Mil-
liken ticket. Time for a change in
Lansing.
LEVIN FOR GOVERNOR-DEMOCRAT
663-5972. 482-2396, 663-6932
11H4
USED CARS
PORSCHE ,'59, 356 A type convertible,
body excellent, eventually will need
engine work. Best offer over $500.
Cali 662-2576, 9-6. 32N49
VW SQUAREIBACK, 1966, black with
red interior, fine cond., best offer.
761-3419. 33N49
'63 R-60 B.M.W. $750. 769-0947. 34N48
VW BUG, 1963, FM, $200. VW Square-
back, blue,.1967, $1400. 665-7057. 35N50
ALPINE 1725, 1966, radials, many ex-
ti-as, excellent condition. $1050. 663-
7042. 1 owner, after five. 19N48
JAGUAR, 1961, 3.8 Mk. 11 Sedan, good
condition, unusual ar. $900 or best
offer. 665-8912. 20N47
'64 FORD Fairlane 500 in ex. ond. Best
offer. Cali Brian at 662-5955 or 764-
0410. 21N48
'65 VW, 47,000 miles, AM-FM radio,
snow tires, 1 owner, 1800. 761-4278
after 5. ISN45
VENERABLE PEUGEOT, $50. 761-8855.
14N46
1962 CONTINENTAL-as is, $150. Needs
wheels and fuel pump; otherwise in
good shape. Call 663-3482 or '663-5512.
ND46

PORSCHE--1965 Coupe. 35,000 miles, ex-
cellent except for some rust. $2300 or
best offer. 662-0309. 11N46
VW, 1966-Red conver. Radio, good con-
dition. Best offer. 971-0420. after 6
P.m. 971-37J08. . 12N47

SUMMER SUBLET
1 BDRM. APT.. 2-man for Aug. Third
and Madison. 665-6985 after 6. 36U49
GIRL NEEDED for 3-man apartmtnt
July 19-Sept. 1. Near campus, own
room. $40. Call 761-9016. 37U47
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted - Own
room, near law quad. $45 rent. Call
663-6828. 38UD50
MODERN EFFICIENCY available July
20 at 418 E. Washington, also fall.
Call 668-6906.1 2Utc
MOD. EFF. for Aug. 5 min. from UGLI.
Negotiable, swimming pool. Call 663-
7846 after 5, keep trying. 10U46
SUMMER RENTALS
Choice Apts. at low rates. Ann Arbor
Trust Co. Phone 769-2800. 22083
SUMMER SUBLETS
761 -8055
14Utc
BIKES AND SCOOTERS
1948 INJDIAN, 500c, twin,'rigid frame,
springer forks, original Indian saddle
bags. $300 or best offer. 761-0745. ZD53
'63 HAR. DA. XLCH, must sell, $825
or best offer. 663-9560. Z51
'67 BSA Hornet 650. Call Larry Toot,!
663-7850. 32Z48
'66 HONDA Super Hawk for sale. Good
condition. Call 665-8789. 3047
HONDA REPAIRS, TUNE-UPS, OVER-
HAULS. Reasonably done, guaran-
teed, 1 day service. 665-5479. 25Z51
MOTORCYCLE tune-up and service. By
appointment only. Call 665-3114. 26Z71
BUSINESS SERVICES
EXPERIENCED public stenographer
wants to do typing in her home:
manuscripts, thesis, business reports.
Call Barbara, 761-0104. 30J50
COUPLE WISHES house-sitting spot
for fall semester. Excellent refer-
ences and experience. Call 663-4323.
28J48
THESES, PAPERS (inc. technical) typ-
ed. Experienced, professonal: IBM
Selectric. Quick service. 663-6291.
42Jtc
EXPERI'ENCED SECRETARY desires
work in her home. Thesis, technical
typing, stuffing etc4.IBM selectric
Call Jeanette, 971-2463, 2Jtc
TASK
ALL THESES-MANUSCRIPTS-PAPERS
expertly typed-edited
PRINTING - THESES - FLYERS
BROCHURES
economical, 24-hr. round-the-clock
service
FOR ANY OFFICE SERVICE
call
THE PROFESSIONALS
10 years experience in Ann Arbor
761-4146 or 761-1187
1900 W. Stadium Blvd.
26Ptc
MULTI PLE
TYPING
SERVICE
'IThesls Service
Papers
Dissertations
General Office and Secretarial Work
Pick-Up and Delivery
Available
Prompt Service
CALL 485-2086
Jtc
PHOTO SUPPLIES
COMPLETE DARKROOM set-up, in-
cludes Omega B22 enlarger. $200. 426-
8969. 22D50
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
HERB DAVID GUITAR STUDIO
Unavailable instruments, repairs and
instructions - 209 S. State. 665-8001.
RADIO, TV, Hi-fi, car repair. House
calls.2Very reasonable-even CHEAP!
769-6250. XD5
"NEW 15" loudspeakersA$20 ea or 6
for $90. New and used ARE sound sys-
tem equipment and parts. 6780 Jack-
son Rd. 13X47
GARRARD SL65 automatic turntable
with base and dust cover. Shure M93E
cartridge. $60 or best offer. Call 761-
5201.- XD48
FOR SALE
RECEIVER AM-FM stereo, $75; mono-
amplifier, $15. Call 665-2111 after four.
-9Btc

BARBELLS, weights, used LP's, 8 mm
Movie Editor. Call 761-0372. 2OB47
KELVINATOR REFRIG., apt. size.764-
6632 or 455-9186. 15B46
BOX SPRINGS and mattress. CHEAP.
1 pr. old, call Joe, 426-3440. 14E47

LINES 1 day
2 1.00
3 1.10
4 1.35
5 1.55
6 1.80
7 2.00
8 2.20
9 2.40
10 2.60
INCHES
1 2.60
2 4.90
3 6.95
4 8.90
5 i0.70

UNCONTRACTED CL

Additional costs per day after six day
Ads that are 11/, 21/2, 312, etc.
average of the lower and higher i

LOST AND FOUND
FOUND-Striped calico kitten, about
4-5 months old. 761-3884. AD48
LOST-13-week-old female puppy, part
labradour and shepherd. Black with
brown and white markings. 514 S.
Forest, Apt. 3E. 662-7524. 26A56
FOUND-Male black puppy, short hair,
floppy ears, white markings on chest.
Call Barbara, 663-3005 after 5. AD48
FOUND-Small brown and black beagle
in School of Natural Resources. 763-
0297. AD47
LOST-4 mo. old orange male kitty.
Near 5th and Madison. Please call
761-1664. 24A49
FOUND-Woman's glasses, Geddes and
Forest, Friday evening. 764-4536, ask
f or Allan. AD47
FOUND - Black shaggy haired puppy
with collar. 665-7962. AD47
FOUND-Pair of wire rim glasses on
S. Univ. Call 769-0142 or 764-8557, ask
for David. AD47
LOST-3 mo. old collie puppy, light
brown and white, female, answers to
"Gru."-Please call 761-6742. 25A49
LOST-Wel loved puppy. Near Burns
Park Sun. Red fur and green eyes.
769-2382. 21A46
PUPPY LOST-Male, brown and white,
greenish eyes. Lost Fri., vie. Forest
and Geddes. 761-8062, anytime. 23A46
PETS AND SUPPLIES
FREE KITTENS AND CATS
all varieties
Call 665-4830
TD52
NEED stud for female Siamese cat in
heat. 663-7259. 15T46

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2 days
1.60
2.15
2.60
3.00
3.40
3.75
4:15
4.55
4 95
4.95
9.50
13.50
17.35
21.10

3 dos
2.35
3.10
3.75
4.35
4.95
5.50
6.10
6.65
7.15
7.15
13.80
19.75
25.55
31.40

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4.J
4.
4.!
6.
73
7.9
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I

Di y
-Defending unpopularciet sik

By ERIC SIEGEL
"T THAS BECOME professionally and
legally dangerous -to be a lawyer
representing the poor, minorities, and
the politically unpopular."
-Harvard Civil Rights-Civil
Liberties Law Review
* * *
PHILIP J. HIRSCHKOP, a 35-year-
old ex-Green Beret and a lawyer for the
American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU),
despite all his legal and political acu-
men, never realized the degree of .truth
in the above statement. Until a few days
ago.
At that time, the disciplinary arm of
the U.S. District Court for the District
of Columbia recommended that Hirsch-
kop be suspended or disbarred for "pro-
fessional misconduct" during last Febru-
ary's trial of nine Catholic laymen and
clergymen who ransacked the Washing-
ton offices of Dow Chemical Company
in a protest against the Vietnam war.
The disciplinary arm, officially known
as the Committee on Admissions and
Grievances, whose members are ap-
pointed by the District Court judges,
charged that Hirschkop
-"failed to support the authority of
the court";

-"was often 'ude, offensive, discour-
teous, disrespectful, abusive and in-
sulting"; and
-that he uttered statements that
were "prejudicial to the administration
of justice."
The Court's grievance committee ini-
tiated a hearing on Hirschkop at the re-
quest of Judge John H. Pratt, who pre-
sided at the trial of the DC Nine. Judge
Pratt also charged Hirschkop with corl-
tempt of court during the seven day
trial, a charge that is now before the
U.S. Court of Appeals.
QUITE OBVIOUSLY, the Hirschkop
case has rather wideranging implica-
tions. These implications were quickly
recognized. Almost immediately after
the committee's recommendations were
released, ACLU released a statement of
its own.
"The grievance committee is, in ef-
fect, serving notice on all attorneys who
handle the defense of political dissi-
dents in the best spirit of the Bill of
Rights that their effectiveness in behalf
of their clients will bring them under
attack."
A day later, an ad hoc committee of
35 lawyers, many of them members of
ACLU, announced that they would be-

gin investigating the grievance commit-
tee. They issued a call for all Washing-
ton lawyers "concerned about the effect
of actions ... of the grievance commit-
tee . . on the vigorous advocacy by
lawyers of unpopular or controversial
causes" to join their investigating com-
mittee. In a prepared statement, the ad
hoc committee said:
"All lawyers recognize that the abuse!
of grievance committee procedures, as
well as the abuse of the contempt power
by courts, poses a chilling threat to any
lawyer who is dedicated to the provision
of equal justice to all persons and groups
in our society, particularly those whose
beliefs are shared by few."
INDEED, OUR WHOLE legal system,
with its manner of posting bonds, and
its manner of selecting juries (how
many people are actually tried by their
peers, i.e., blacks by blacks and radicals,
by radicals) is.weighted heavily enough
against these groups, without any at-
tempts by court-directed grievance com-
mittees to intimidate the lawyers who-
defend them.
THE BROADER IMPLICATIONS not-
withstanding, there are many specific
facets of the Hirschkop case that are

intriguing in their own Way. For one
thing there are the statements he made
during the trial to Judge Pratt, saying,
among other things, that Pratt was
prejudiced and unable to conduct the
trial fairly. These statements were held
o constitute "professional misconduct."
Yet according to DC law,- if a lawyer
moves to have a judge dismissed, as
Hirschkop did, then he must state ex-
actly why:
Then there is the question of why, of
the three lawyers who defended the DC
Nine and used similar tactics and lan-
guage, only Hirschkop-was recommend-
ed for suspension or disbarment. ACLU
lawyers think they have the answer:
Hirschkop was the most effective of all
the lawyers, and, besides, as a national
director of ACLU, he was a visible target
for their repression.
And what of Hirschkop? What is his
reaction to the whole thing? He said he
question's the committee's "ethics and
motives" while his appeal is still in liti-
gation. He also has shown that he is not
about to be intimidated by the commit-
tee, the District Court, or anyone else.
The day after the committee released its
recommendations, Hirschkop went to
Richmond to consult with one of his
clients.

761-8055
BARGAIN CORNER

49Ctc

Sam's Store
NEED LEVIS?
VISIT
US
FOR
BLUE DENJM:
Super Slims .......6.50
Button-Fly ........6.50
Traditional . -...6.98
Bells ., . . ....7.50
BLUE CHAMBRAY
SHIRTS ..........2.49
MORE LEVI'S
"White" Levi's . . . 5.50
. (4 Colors)
Sto-Prest "White"
Levi's ... . .. ...6.98
Nuvo's ...........8.50
Over 7000 Poirs in Stock!
Sam's Store
122 E. Washington

NEED HOME for any of 3 cats, 1 black
female (will spay if desired), striped
kitten, and large striped male. 764-
9550, 769-6661. 769-4339. 14'T46
ROOMMATES WANTED
2 FEMALE Roommates wanted, 4-man
apart. Call 761-3198 after 6. 15Y49
THIRD GIRL needed-2 bdrm. house,
for fall. 1020 Oakland, No. 3. Call NO
8-8367. 16Y49
FOR WINTER, $50/mo. 4th girl needed
for house, Murray Street, 15 min. from
campus. Call Goya, 761-5542. 17Y48
1 FEMALE needed for 2-mart fall apt.
Near campus and hospitals. KE 4-9325,1
Detroit. 14Y46
WANTED TO BUY
CAR WANTED-4 6 cylinder (low
horsepower), 1967 or older, good con-
dition, economical. 761-0047. 30K
TRANSPORTATION
I NEED A RIDE TO BOSTON around
July 20. Will share driving, expenses.
Call Vicky, 665-4830. GD52
WANT RIDE to N.Y.C. Aug. 2, p.m.,
Dearborn campus faculty. 271-2300,
ext. 342. 29G50
2 OR 3 RIDERS needed for San Fran-
cisco area, leaving around July 20.'
Call 662-2087 after 5 .46047
PERSONAL
AMANDA FENWICK'S fabulous sale,
leather shirts, tops, coats, $10-825.
522 E. William. 24F48
COMING - Jimmy Caras, Billiards,
champion, M Union, 9-16-70. 25F47
If you are trying to meet
INTERESTING PEOPLE
in Ann Arbor, come to the BACH CLUB
Tb ursdays at 8 p.m.
Canmerbury House)
23F51

TI
TI
_
PA
Fl
a
F1
I
-

DON'T be a wall flower- -be a WILD
flower with fat:h ions from WILD-I
FLOWER-the unique boutique. 516
E. William (above the Campus Bike
. and Toy Shop). 26F48
GAY LIBERATION FRONT
Meeting in Union Lounge
8:30 p.m.
27F46

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