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July 16, 1970 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1970-07-16
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4 4 4

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, ,July 16, 191V

Thursday, July 16, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

e.Th _rsdar,..uly¢16..17

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

House group asks GI insanit

WASHINGTON (g') -Con-
gressmen who have reported
there was a coverup of the al-
leged massacre at My Lai want
soldiers accused of war crimes-
to be given the right to plead
temporary insanity.
And one of the investigators
said yesterday it is possible
that some of the troops thought
they were under orders "to wipe
everybody out" the day more
than 100 South Vietnamese civ-
ilians were slain in the little
hamlet.
Rep. F. Edward Hebert, (D-
La.), chairman of the investi-
gating Committee, said he
would modify the Nuernberg
war trials concept that every
soldier is responsible for what
he does, even if acting under
orders.
Hebert said he and his fellow
investigators would permit
soldiers accused of war crimes
to plead temporary insanity in-
duced by the strains of com-
bat.
At a news conference, Rep.
Charles S. Gubser, (R-Calif.),
advanced the theory that the
accused soldiers may have

thought they were under direct
orders to kill everyone in My
Lai. -
He said there was confusion
because officers expected to
find no civilians in My Lai and
many in the assault unit
thought they were going into
battle against a seasoned enemy
that had killed many., of their
companions in the days just
prior to the incident of March
16, 1968. ,
"With all these factors," Gub-
ser said, "it is possible there
could have been confusion that
the orders were to wipe every-
body out."
Another panel member, Rep.
William L. Dickinson, (R-Ala.),
told the news conference he is
convinced more than 100 civil-
ians were killed deliberately
and without regard to age or sex
after being herded together.
Hebert said earlier in an in-
terview that his staff is study-
ing the possibility of writing
into military law a provision to
establish temporary insanity as
a valid defense for soldiers ac-
cused of war crimes.
"This should give them (GIs)

Y lea
an out." Hebert said in an in-
teryiew. "They've got no out
under Nuernberg. Under Nuren-
berg, everybpdy's guilty."
He said the soldier accused of
crimes under the mental stress
of battle should be entitled to
the same defense of legal in-
sanity that civilians have.
This modification in the Uni-
form Code of Military Justice
was recommended in the sub-
committee's report to its parent
House Armed Services Commit-
tee released Tuesday:
"That no charge involving an
alleged capital offense, commit-
ted during a military action
against an enemy, shall be re-
ferred to trial by court martial
until a duly appointed com-
petent authority has determined
the mental responsibility of the
prospective accused at the time
of the alleged crime."
The subcommittee r e c o m-
mended also consideration of
civilian trials for crimes alleged-
ly commit'ted in while the serv-
ice by a veteran who can no
longer be reached by military
justice.,

LET'S GET
ACQUAINTED!
Hair styling for
men, women and children
DASCOLA
U-M Barbers
formerly Lee's
East Univ. at So. U.
Join The Daily
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THAI CHIEF:
'United States close
to mental reakdown'
BANGKOK, Thailand -- Foreign Minister Thanat Kho-
man suggested yesterday the United States is on the verge of
a national mental breakdown that has affected its reliability
as an ally.
Speaking at an American Chamber of Commerce Lunch-
eon with U.S. Ambassador Leonard Unger in the audience,:
Thanat said current upheavals in American society made it
"difficult for those working closely and loyally with the Unit-
-- ed States to expect a well reas-

-
,'* Mm "m ar It VO
news
### t~r fnb o
By The Assoc
THE JUSTICE DEPARTMENi
years, is asking the Subversive A
tify an organization as a Communi
The board, created in 1950, was

MICHIGAN REPERTORY '70f
--university players---
*TONIGHT *
shakespeare
THE MERCHANT OF VENICE

Lydia Mendelmsohiu Theatre
Air Conditioned

8:00 p.M,.
Ph: 668-6300

Rep. Edward Hebert

5,000 IN 18 MONTHS
Emergency task force
created on bombings

WASHINGTON (P)- With the open-
ing of two Congressional inquiries Wed-
nesday into terror bombings, the Nixon
administration said it has a special emer-
gency task force on the bombing prob-
lem.
Asst. Atty. Gen. Will Wilson said the
administration is studying a n e w ap-
proach that would involve federal regu-
lation of the explosive industry.
The task force is developing a new bill,
he said, to be presented to Congress next
week.
Wilson testified before the House Ju-
diciary committee.
At the same time, Eugene Rossides, as-
sistant secretary of the Treasury, told the
Senate Investigations subcommittee that
Record cane
larvest fails
in Cuba
MIAMI, Fla. OP) - Cuba's "10-million-
ton sugar harvest" is nearing an end,
1%/ million tons short of its goal, but
still an all-time record, Havana Radio
says.
Havana radio reported yesterday-the
day Prime Minister Fidel Castro made a
target for reaching the 10 millionth ton
- that production totaled 8,466,072 tons.
The harvest was over except for a few
fields. Tuesday's production had trick-
led to 8,419 tons.
Cuba prepared for a post harvest cel-
ebration on July 26. But the emphasis, in
broadcasts monitored here, was on ob-
serving the anniversary of Castro's revo-
lution on that date rather than on cele-
brating the harvest. There was no men-
tion of Christmas or New Years, which
Castro had postponed until July in order
not to interrupt cane cutting.
The harvest, well over Cuba's previous
peak of 7.2 million tons in 1952, also was
the longest, lasting 12 months, nearly
double the pre-Castro cutting periods.
The big production will permit Cuba
to meet its commitment of five million
tons to the Soviet Union at an inflated 6
cents a pound, and still have a substan-
tial supply to sell on the world market
for badly needed foreign, exchange.
Two groups of people from the United
States have journeyed to Cuba to help
with the sugar harvest. The two Veneer-
emos Brigades have each spent six weeks
cutting cane and travelling around the
country. Another Brigade is scheduled to
leave in early August.

the task force has been at work for sev-
eral months.
Rossides said there were at least 4,330
bombings; 1,475 attempted bombings and
35,129 bomb threats in the 16-month per-
iod beginning Jan. 1, 1969.
The identity of those responsible for
bombings is unknown in 64 per cent of all
cases he said.
But of the remaining, he said police
departments report 56 per cent can be
attributed to disorder on the campus.
In addition, Rossides said his statistics,
based on reports from state and local po-
lice agencies, attribute 19 per cent of
known bombers as black extremists, 14
per cent as white extremists of both the
radical right and left, and 8 per cent by
criminals engaged in robberies, and ar-
son for insurance and extortion.
He said a breakdown of the bombing,
indicate 3,335 were committed with in-
cendiary devices, including fire bombs
known as Molotov cocktails and that 975
were caused by high explosives.
"The bombings have been shocking and
incredibly cold blooded," Rossides said.
But he agreed with Sens. Jacob Javits
(R-N.Y.), a n d Charles Percy (R-Tll.),
who said care must be taken lest too
precipitous a crackdown cause a general
repression of political dissent.

SA TURDAY and SUNDAY MA TINEES
WEEKEND CLASSICS
each weekend tht Fifth Forum brings back a fine
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onem an i danucred reacton ell yesterday to designate the Young
for Market Education, both with he
Thanat, a former ambassador fronts for Communist activity.
to the United States and archi- The Young Workers League, Mi
tect of the military alliance that
allows large numbers of Ameri- st youth organization, created and
cans to be stationed in -Thailand, party." He said the center is opera
declared this feeling was shared munist party.
"along the length and breadth of * *
Asia." THE SENATE, without deba
His main theme was that Thai- sent to the House a bill to set ur
land had been unjustifiably criti- ance program to make family-pla
cized by the American press and available to all Americans who war
liberal politicans for supporting The five-year birth-control ass
the U.S. war effort in South Viet- expected to cost $1 billion and will
nam with troops and by granting of Population Affairs under the £
air bases in Thailand. and Welfare.
"One can say without hesita- The office would administer a
Lion that of all the countries in states, public agencies and nonprof
Asia and perhaps the world, which ningpoetmnoe riig
have cooperated with the United n rjcs apwrtannc
States, few have given so much in ulation-control research.
return for American genorosity as
the Thai government and people," THE CALIFORNIA SUPREM
he said. lease Black Panther cofounder Ht
He said the U.S. government in- Men's Colony pending a new tria
sisted that Thailand send troops Oakland policeman.
to South Vietnam and had offer- Attorney Charles R. Garry peti
ed to defray the expenses -of the Newton on his own recognizance t
troops to "alleviatet h e burden for liberation of black people."
that Thailand already had to Newton is serving 2 to 15 years .
ea d1967 shooting of officer John Frey.
He said that this agreement had May 2 by the District Court of Ap
been misrepresented by politicians
in Washington to mean the Unit- appealed from this ruling to the sta
ed States had hired Thai mercen- F
aries and offered Thailand a bil- STRIKING DOCK WORKER
lion-dollar bribe to send troops to yesterday for the first time in

Vietnam.

blow to a nation that lives by e
The dockers walked of the jo
jected a management offer yesterday
"We are prepared for a long sti
leader of the Transport and Genera
ain's 47,000 dock workers belong.
William Tonge, chairman of t
E Employers, said management woul
during the strike.
"There is a national docks s
got no one to negotiate with,"
1I

--associated Press
Jourey's end
Arthur Blessitt, Hollywood evangelist, arrives at the Capitol Tuesday. Blessitt,
his followers and a 105-pound cross on wheels ended a 4,000-mile march from
California. He plans a weekend rally for what he says is spiritual rebirth as an
answer to the country's ills and problems.

1klATE

NOW SHOWING!!
NOTE
SPECIAL SHOW TIMES
2-5 AND 8 P.M. ONLY ...

REV. 1. SONGLIEDONG
GOD IN GHANA
NEWMAN CENTER
331 Thompson
July 17-8 P.M.

U-M Barbers
8:30-5:15 P.M.
Monday-Saturday
Michigan Union

I

July 17-8 P.M.

Not~h" e been left out of Mwh Advenxm"

A BM CONTINUED

Senate
$10 bi

Pentagon

critics ask

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r#

'

PRESENTS
PETER BOWEN
AND
MIKE SMITH
cultural heroes what pick and sinq
Fri., Sat. night 8 P.M.
July 17-18 $1.50

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WASHINGTON (P) - Senate Pentagon
critics yesterday proposed cuts up to $10
billion in the defense budget which al-
ready looks austere in the eyes of the
body's Armed Services Committee chair-
man.
The committee reported for Senate
floor action next week a $19.2-billion de-
fense procurement bill, down 6.7 per cent
or $1.3 billion from the Nixon adminis-
tration request of $20.3 billion. It con-
tinues, basically, the Safeguard ABM
program.
The over-all defense request is f o r
$71.2 billion, and t h e sections dealing
with such things as manpower will come
up later in the year.
The $10-billion cut was proposed for the
entire budget by an ad hoc group of Sen-
ators led by Republican Mark Hatfield
.of Oregon and Democrat William Prox-
mire of Wisconsin.
The critics' proposals would whack

about $5 bil:
keeping Safe
levels, droppi
program, stop
man ICBMst
stricting seve
building and,
An additio
be accomplis
reduction of
lion along w
Europe and P
The armed
man, Sen. Jo
acterized the
by his panel
sible dollar le
cessity for pr
national surv
"It would b
"if we did not
alism of our
the latest ani

cut or defense
lion f r o m procurement by thorization recommended by this com-
guard spending at research mittee is adequate to cover only the most
ing the B1 manned-bomber essential requirements."
Aping conversion of Minute- However, said Proxmire in a news con-
to MIRV warheads, and re- ference, "More needs to be done.
eral areas of N a v y ship- "The 6.7 per cent cut is very welcome,
aircraft buying. but after conference with the House we
nal $5 billion saving would may end up with half that amount. Be-
hed by a one million man cause of that fact alone, we must do
U.S. force levels to 2.5 mil- more."
with reduction of forces in
Korea. Proxmire and other senators appearing
i services committee chair- with him also called for a fresh review
hn Stennis (D-Miss.) char- of the entire concept of national secur-
procurement bill forwarded ity.
as austere, "the lowest pos- "Military spending alone does not im-
evel consistent with the ne- prove national security," s a i d Sen.
oviding the weapons for our Charles McMathias (R-Md.).
ival." The first phase of the defense spernd-
e criminal indeed," he said, ing debate next week will be the ABM
t match the high profession- and here critics figure savings c o u 1d
American servicemen with range from $404 million to $1.4 billion
d best equipment. The au- over-all.

I

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DIAL 8-6416

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TWIN NCORE

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APM AMCA*4TPnW
.IOSEPH E.LEVINE PRESENTS THE LEWIS GIL5ERT FILM OF
THE ADVENTURERS
Based on ft Novgi "TitADVEHTURER"'by KQM DROBINS
CHARLES AZNAVOUR'- ALAN BAEL - CANDICE BERGEN
THOMMY BERGGREN - DELIA BOCCARDO - ERNEST BORONINE
ROSSANO BRAZZI -OLMA do AIILLAND - BEKIM FEHmU a
ANNA MOO' -"LEIGN TAYLOR-YOUNG
FiASTw6SWLEW5GLS8ERT by z IWCM 0N r wtenT~
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WIN N E R! 3 ACADEMY AWARDS
INCLUDING BEST ACTRESS KATHARINE HEPBURN
PETER OTOOL KATHARINE HEPBURN
a MARTIN P
HEN
LION IN WIITICE nAC0tMAS ~

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MICHAEL4

CAINE ANTHONY QUINN
"The MAGUS"
A Truly Greot Film in Beautiful Color

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