100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 10, 1970 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-07-10
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eght

* if

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

4

f

6

Friday, July 10, 1970

TH MCHGA DIL

F

Friday July 10 1970

Fr)davooJulyo10.o197
Dk~O~kbOk~b~kb

I

For Direct Classified Ad Service, Plaosc 76
12 Noon Deadine Monday through Friday, 10:00 to 3:00

Succotash,

temp urau.. .

beets

and

the,

Wook

A feature review by Deborah Levine

Like the art of love, the art of
cooking can be exquisite, per-
functory, or banal, and in these
two as inuevery human activity
some of us perform more bril-
liantly than others. S u c h an
association may seem whimsi-
cal, but there is a certain con-
nection between them: the prep-
aration and consumption of
food and the seduction and en-
joyment of the lover are two
totally absorbing occupations,
compounded of beauty, absurd-
ity, snobbery - and c r u e l t y
("Take a superb and lively cray-
fish, cut it in pieces, and throw
it, still breathing, into finest
oil in a saucepan on a very hot
fire"). The formula for success
in both endeavors is very often
derived from following the ad-
vice Hugo von Hofmannsthal
offered his Marshallin: "One
must take it lightly/ with light
heart and light hands."
The soupcon of cruelty which
spices both culinary and erotic
arts should not be exaggerated,
neither can it be ignored, for
it is an important ingredient in
the flavor of each. We might
hesitate to describe Irma Rom-
bauer as the Marquise de Sade
of the kitchen range, but it is
curious to note how the propor-
tion of deliciousness increases
with the amount of discomfort
to the living product: see, for
example, any recipe for the pre-
liminary purifying of snails, or
a description of the process by
which humble goose liver is
transformed into gourmet pate
de foie gras. "Food is far too
pleasant to combine with hor-
ror," observed Alice B. Toklas
in her classic chapter on "Mur-
der in the Kitchen." "All the
same," Miss Toklas added cheer-
fully, ". . . crime is inevitable."
Crime and sex boom books, and
so, apparently, does food, if the
venerable sales histories of The
Boston Cooking School Cook-
book and Mrs. Rombauer's Joy
of Cooking are any indication.
Cookbook publishers, moreover,
enjoy an advantage over many
of their colleagues. As innova-
tions in kitchen equipment and
the packaging and preparation
of food occur, cookbooks can be
easily "updated" -- stuffed or
streamlined, u s u a 11 y with a
healthy price-rise; but a re-
vised edition of a best seller like
What You Always Wanted to
Know About Sex might tend to
fasten injurious suspicions upon
its author's claim to expertise.
Who buys cookbooks, and
why? The American female, pre-
sumably - for herself, but per-
Master chef, gardener, and
Austenite, Deborah Levine is
presently occupied studying for
doctoral exams in Indian Art
History. Ink drawings have
been provided by Sewall Oert-
ling.
haps more often to give on some
appropriate festive occasion. The
s e l e c t i o n offered is diverse
enough to daunt all but the in-
itiated or the i m p uls e buyer.
Once beyond the maternally
familiar shoals of Farmer and
Rombauer, we are literally adrift
in a sea of old standbys, re-
prints, and the formidable nuim-
ber of new titles churned out by
the cookbook industry each sea-
son. For the twentieth century
cookbook is not, like its pre-
decessors, that comfortable com-
pendium to which a woman

might resort in moments of ex-
tremity for hints on the proper
handling of servants and the
best method of taking stains
from wallpaper, or for advice on
the feeding and stabling of that
improbable creature, the Victor-
ian Male.
Modern cookbooks reflect
modern life in all its fragmen-
tation and specialization. There
are cookbooks for the art lover,
the travel enthusiast, the tenny-
bopper, and the millionaire; for
dyspeptics, diabetics, and Gay
Bachelors. We are urged to
tamper with the Great Cuisines
of the Western World, to experi-
ment with soyflour, avocado,

can judge, authentic. No part of
the bird is neglected, except the
feet (which are edible); the
range is from satisfyingly sim-
ple to challenging; and the re-
cipes t e s t e d by this reviewer
more than vindicated their
author's superlatives. While this
book is highly recommended for
the private kitchen its potential
as a gift is limited by the un-
attractive format. One can only
wish that the publishers them-
selves had been gifted with
aesthetic foresight, and that
Mrs. Sias had followed her own
good advice: "Delicious-enough
said!"
American teen-agers are en-
couraged to cook in a book writ-
ten especially for them, Cook in
by Kathleen Dunning Fisher
(David White, $5.95), designed
to appeal to adolescent tastes by
virtue of its simplicity, brevity,
and (presumably) a high pro-
portion of recipes for sweets and
sweet drinks. The book is neat
and brightly illustrated and
contains useful s e c t i o n s on
equipment, diet, and kitchen
safety, but one suspects that to-
day's turned-on teen would feel
more at home in Alice's Restau-
rant. The serious adolescent
gourmet, on the other hand,
would do well to invest in an
adult cookbook, perhaps The
Spice Cookbook by Avanelle Day
and Lillie Stuckey, another
White publication. Although not
a recent title we mention it here
because it is possibly the finest
general cookbook in print, ideal
for both beginner and sophisti-
cate. The recipes are of almost
invariably high quality -some,
brilliantly innovative. The recipe
for beet pancakes given below
(slightly condensed) has revo-
lutionized this reviewer's ancient
antipathy to the beet:
Spice Cookbook Beet Pancakes
1 c. finely chopped cooked
fresh beets
2 tbs. cornstarch
4 large egg yolks, beaten
3 tbs. heavy cream or
evaporated milk
!/2 tsp. sugar
1 tsp. salt
2 tsp. ground nutmeg
Combine all ingredients, mix
well and b a k e in pancake
fashion on a hot buttered
skillet. (Pancakes should be
tiny. Serve with Keiller's
orange marmalade.)
Many established cookbooks
are infinitely better than the
publishers' latest gimmicks. Two
titles come especially to mind in
this connection, Mary Casella's
A World of Baking ($6.95) and
A World of Breads ($5.95), both
published by David White. The
latter especially should'be sought
out by anyone wishing to own,
or give, a distinguished cook-
book. Liberated or enslaved, the
American female seems to be in
the process of rediscovering the
ancient, beautiful art of bread--
making, and here is solidly'
nourishing fare-truly a cook-
book for all seasons. Bread-bak-
ing friends of talent swear by it.
For impoverished students an
adequate substitute exists in
Ted and Jean Kaufman's The
Complete Bread Cookbook (Pa-
perback Library, 95e). While
scanting on yeast breads (a
feature of the Casella book), it
is especially good on quick
breads, plain and exotic (try the
Greek Hymettus Honey Bread),
and on econmny bread desserts.
A charming if minor adden-
da to bread cooking is entitled,
appropriately enough, Cooking
with Bread by Adelaide Hecht-

linger (Stephen Greene Press,
$1). This pamphlet-it scarcely
qualifies as a paperback-of-
fers some pleasantasuggestions
on the use of bread already bak-
ed, with an eye to simplicity and
simple budgets. Three other tit-
les in the same series, by Bea-
trice Vaughan, would make at-
tractive stocking stuffers: Store
Cheese Cooking, Real Old-Time
Yankee Maple Cooking, and
Real Old-Time Yankee Apple
Cooking.
These disarmingly modest-lit-
tle volumes are probably not
well known outside New Eng-
land, but like the Ideal Yankee
of bardic lore, they give a lot for
a little.
Beatrice Vaughan's
"Winter Stra'berries"
1 c. fresh cranberries, ground
4 medium apples, ground
2 c. sugar
Mix thoroughly. Chill in re-
frigerator for\ an hour or so.
Makes about 4 cups.
Pacifia House offers three new
titles for which an explanation
should be given, since none is
self-evident - none, that is,
unless It be the publisher's de-
sire to crash the cookbook-pub-
lishing club, not, unfortunately,
a particularly select or exclusive
organization. Cooking Secrets
Your Mother,Never Told You is
described as "a rare collection of
family recipes and menus with a
gourmet flair;" but the secret
unknown to Mother is appar-
ently Lawry's Seasonings-salt,
pepper, what-have-you -- since
these ingredients appear in ev-
ery recipe with the predictabil-
ity of a Callas tantrum. The re-
cipes themselves are not espec-
ially distinguished. While we
would not wish to knock Lawry's
Seasonings (they are, in moder-
ation, excellent, recommended
by such eminent gourmets as
Morrison Wood as well as by
our own Mother), we must con-
fess to a certain sensation of
ennui at meeting with them on
every page. Imaginative cooks
would presumably wish to ex-
periment with those very herbs
and spices for which Lawry's
Seasonings too often serve as

could not have devised oneself
en route to the patio.
Copper, earthenware, a n d
cast-iron areathe three mater-
ials beloved of gourmets and
for the last, at least, a most at-
tractive cookbook has been de-
vised, Cast Iron Cook Book by
Hester Callahan (Nitty Gritty
Publications, $3.95), a paperback
with intriguingly long, lean for-
mat. One would not, presumably,
prepare mousse au grand mar-
nier in a cast-iron casserole,
and the recipes included here
are such as would be termed, at
least before the onset of the
Unisex, "Man's Food." Red
Beans Creole, Ale Steak. Joe
Booker Stew, Macon Hominy
Grits - good, strong - dishes
these, simple enough to tempt
anyone who refuses to be up-
tight about cooking, and hearty
enough to galvanize a Weather-
man. The book is not prohibi-
tively expensive, either - one
might invest in a piece of cast
iron at the same time.
An even more up-to-the-min-
ute title by the same publisher,
Gary Lee's The Wok ($3.95), is
equally attractive. The line-
drawings are fun and the nub-
bly-textured heavy paper makes
the book feel good. The author
indulges himself in homegrown
Chinese wisdom, which occa-
sionally gets in the way of his
recipes, but he is refreshingly
relaxed about adaptations and
substitutions. Mr. Lee insists,
however, that "stir-fry" is really
"Chinese-fry" - after we had-
mastered that terminological
transfer, and absorbed the con-
cept of looo, we found fairly
clear sailing.
Since the days of Henry
James, foreign cooking has in-
trigued the optimistic American
(It must be good. It's French!")
Of late, Italy, Mexico, and the
Far East have offered la belle
cuisine some trenchant com-
petition. While we hesitate to
recommend unreservedly two
new Sunset paperbacks, Sunset
Oriental Cookbook (Lane, $1.95).
and Sunset Mexican Cookbook
(Lane $1.95), we would point
out that this publisher's consis-

FOR RENT
NEAR MEDICAL CENTER
1035 Walls St.--Furnished, new, modern
efficiency, 1 and 2 bedroom available.
1-864-3852 or 665-7273. 1lCtc
1 OR 2 NEEDED to take over lease for
Sept.-May. Beautiful bi-level, Call
769-7467 after 5. 25C45
FOR FALL: modern 2-man, close to
campus, 663-3890. 24043
ROOMS FOR RENT for rest of summer
and some available for fall term.
769-6637. 23044
UR DFALL RENTAL
1 and 2 Bedroom Apts.
1111 5. State
1506 Packard
1-864-3852, 353-7389 or
761-2366 after 5.
12Ctc
APTS.-Sumnmer & Fall. on and off-
campus. 1217 S. U. 761-7764. 22048
2 BDRM. FU KN. units on campus.
mvail. for fall. McKinley Assoc., 663-
6448. 15Ctc
2 BDRM. FURN. units on campus,
avail, for fall. McKinley Assoc., 663-
6448. 50Ctc
1 AND 2 BDRM. furn. units for fall, 1
bdrm. $155 and $160. 2 bdrm. from
$210 for 2, from $225 for 3. Call 663-
1761 15044
FURN. APT. for rent 'til Aug. 20. 2250
Fuller Rd. 663-9576 eves. 16045
SINGLE ROOM. 428 Cross St. AA. $55,
663-3886. 21C43
CAMPUS

FOR RENT
Campus-Hospital
Fall Occupancy
Furnished Apartments
Campus Management, Inc.
662-7787 335 E. Huron
47Ctc
3-BDRM. HOUSE, available Aug. 15,
North Campus. on 2 acres land. 665-
6390, ANYTIME after 2 p.m. perss-
tently. 13Ctc
NEWLY Panelled single rooms for men.
3 ,blocks from Engin. Arch. Available
now. 663-9530. 26C45-
911 S. Forestw
Near Hill St.-Modern 2 Bdrm,. 3-man.
668-6906. Fall. 14Ctc
THE ABBEY THE LODGE
CARRIAGE HOUSE
THE FORUM VISCOUNT
still the local favorites! Several select
apartments available for summer and
fall semesters in each of these mndern
buildings.
Charter Realty
Fine Campus Apartments
1335 S. University 665 8825
UCCtc
AUGUST OCCUPANCY

TRANSPORTATION
14 NITES, 15 DAYS. $407 from Chicagc
to Hawaii. L.A., Honolulu, Kaui and
Maui, hotel/motel accom. included,
plus $41.20 porterage and tax. Cali
GL 3-0096 for reservations. 42G42
PLEASE HELP 2 chicks and baby move
out west, can leave anytime, can drive
and help pay for gas. Please call
Mary, 662-3364, t44G44
20 DAYS in the Orient (Expo), depari
from San Francisco. $1095 round trip.
Hotel/motel accommodations includec
and some meals. Porterage and tax
additional. Call GL 3-0096 for reser-
vations. 40G42
WANT RIDERS to New York City. Leav-
ing on Friday the tenth. Call Paul
at 665-4830. GD4
WANT TRAVELLING companion for
Europe and Africa, possibly India.
Leaving early Aug. Pete, eves.. 769-
7161. 41042
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
AKAI 1800 SD Cartridge Tape Record-
er plus accessories, reel-to-reel, reel-
to-cartridge, 4 speeds, auto. shut-off.
$350. Lou Hudson, 761-1345, after 6.
11X43
HERB DAVID GUITAR STUDIO
Instruments and accessories, new and
used. Lessons, repairs. 209 State.
665-8001. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. X
RADIO, TV, Hi-Fi repair. House calls-
Very reasonable!',Very cheap! 769-
6250. DX42
BIKES AND SCOOTERS

01
d
2
e
e
a
4
t
x
z
z
r
r
3
l

ROOMMATES WANTED
2 UPPERCLASSMEN needed to fill big LO
house. Aug. 1. $70 mo.man plus F+
utilities. 668-8667. 13Y44
FEMALE ROOMMATES wanted to share RE
apt. in Fall, prefer grad-professionals. b
Reply Box 55, Daily. 10Y43 6
WOMAN GRAD WANTED TO SHARE FO
2-man. 2-bdrm. apt. in house close'w
to campus. Call Sara, 769-1325. 11Y4 27
SUMMER SUBLET L W
SUBLET-Roommate needed in 4-man C
apt,, A/C, color TV.. $10/wk., now
thru August. Call 668-7626. 8U45 20
4TH GIRL wanted for July-Aug., im- -
mediate occupancy, great location
Call 769-2249. 9U44
SUBLET-1 man or couple, July 13 thru -
Aug. 22. $90 total rent. 1107 S. StateFOl
No. 2. 663-0150. 6042 in

I

ROOMMATE needed July-Aug., own
bedroom in charming house. 761-7219.
7U42i
OWN BDRM. in large 5 rm. apt., close
to campus, available now. 882-9833.
5U44
JULY-AUG. sublet-Own bedroom in 3-
man on Packard. $35/mo. Peter, 761-
7846. 3U421

}FOX
W
7f
IF
A
cc
S
7:
IMes
FR
D

ROOM FOR MEN ONLY
$35-Call 668-6906.

4U4E

I
l

and peanut butter, to sample the
cooking of Upper Volta. T h e
selection of recently published
cookbooks reviewed below is in-
tended as a partial guide for
those who wish to invest in a
new cookbook, for whatever rea-
son, and who want, as the com-
mercials caution, to "Be Sure"
--for cookbooks reflect another
inevitable aspect of modern liv-
ing: they are expensive. Paper-
backs and alternate titles are
recommended whenever feasible.
Faced with Beverly Sias' The
C h i c k e n Cookbook (Barnes,
$8.95), one might well be
tempted to pass on to the next
likely candidate. Here is a vis-
ually unappetising volume, hea-
vy, indifferently bound, and pro-
vided with a dustjacket depress-
ingly reminiscent of the kind of
institutional photograph which
used to find its way into dieti-
clan's magazines of the early
nineteen thirties. Yet to do so
would be a mistake, at least
from the point of view of those
who like to cook and eat chicken,
for this is a superb--if irritating
--cookbook. Its author, as the
blurb informs us, worked for an
advertising firm. Each chapter
is larded with a Chamber-of-
Commerce prose introduction to
the delights of a particular re-
gional or national cuisine. Yet,
for those who care to carve their
way through visions of chuck-
wagon hospitality and picnics
on the lawn at Tara '(complete
with "dignified, dusky waiters"),
the rewards are not inconsider-
able.
Mrs. Sias has pursued the do-
mestic fowl across four conti-
nents. Her recipes are diverse,
imaginative, and as far as one

NEW, FURNISHED
APARTMENTS
FOR FALL
DAH LMANN I
APARTMENTS
545 CHURCH ST.
761 -7600
38Ctc
Summit
Assoc iates
CHOICE APARTMENTS
STILL AVAILABLE
FOR FALL
761-80551
49Ct e
7ll ARCH-Near State and Packard-
Modern 2-bdrm. apts. for Fall. Dish-
washer, balcony, air-cond., and much
more. Phone 761-7848 or 482-8867. 26Cte
AVAIL. FOR SUMMER & FALL
ALBERT TERRACE
1700 Geddes
Beautifully decorated, large 2 bedroom.
bi-level apartments. Stop in daily
noon to 5:30 (Mon.-Fri.), 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. Sat. or phone 761-1717 or 665-
8825. 11 tc
CAMPUS-HOSPITAL REDUCED, attrc-
tive paneled small furn. first floor
room for man or woman, 21 or over,
house refrigerator. $10.50/wk. Lease
through Aug. 663-5666 or 971-6270.
190tc
BARGAIN CORNER
Sam's Store
NEED LEVIS -
VISIT
us
FOR
BLUE DENIM: F
Super Slims ...... 6.50
Button-Fly ........50
Traditional.......6.98
Bells7........ 7.50
BLUE CHAMBRAY
SHIRTS..........2.49
MORE LEVI'S
"White" Levi's . . 5.50
(4 Colors)
Sta-Prest "White"
Levi's..........6.98
Nuvo's .... .. 8.50
Over 7000 Pairs in Stock!
Sam's Store
122 E. Washington -

r
a
i

Apartments
Limited
ONE AND TWO BEDROOM
APARTMENTS FOR FALL
663-0511
761 -5440
50Ctc
WANTED TO RENT
SINGLE APT.. normal facilities, for
July-Aug., preferably near campus.
Please reply Box 378. Mich. Daily.
DLtc
HELP WANTED
WANTED: undergraduate to assist pro-
fessor (in Wheelchair) in return for
room and board. 761-9034 after 5.
3H44
ART STUDENTS who are now taking.
or have recently taken painting;
courses wanted for psych experiment.
Total time will be about 2 hours.
spread over 3 testing sessions, pay
$2.50/hr. Call David Shapiro, days.
429-2531. or eves., 663-9769, to set upj
appt. 50H41}
EARN '$25 by donating cerebrospinal
fluid. Need 21-40 yr. old males-fe-
males. 764-0298. 11R42
LIVE-IN babysitter for two delightful
tots, 5 and 7, for remainder of sum-
mer in motherless home. Room, salary
and meals. Call mornings or evenings
761-2023. HD
INTERESTED IN GIVING TOURS OF
Central Campus? Prospective Univer-
sity of Michigan students and their
families are eager to be shown the
campus. If you have a spare hour a
week to volunteer your services.
please call Betty van den Bosch at
the Alumni Association -- 764-0384--
between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. or
call John Hamilton at 761-7808 in the
evenings. 86943
OWNER OF 60 ft. schooner plans 1-3
yr. world cruise. Needs cameraman
experienced with 16 mm color film.
Also needs competent nurse. Pay var-
ies from low to non-existent. Write
Leo A. Frankowski, 185 Puritan, High-
land Park, Michigan. 5H42
LAW ENFORCEMENT DIRECTOR
iacomb County Law Enforcement and
Criminal Justice Commission are
seeking the services of a Law 8n-
forcement Director to co-ordinate the
activities of the commission and pro-
vide a liaison between the local, re-
gional and state planning groups and
law enforcement agencies within the
County.
Applicants must possess at least a
baccalaureate degree or qualifications
acceptable to the Crime Commission
and have some experience with the
components of a Criminal Justice
System.
Salary, depending upon qualifications.
Maximum $15,000.00.
Send resume to:
Edmund A. Schmidt
Chairman Judiciary Public Safety
Committee
Board of Commissioners
County Building
Mt. Clemens, Michigan 48043 F
4H4(

wea . ay service. oo-J 5 . .51
MOTORCYCLE tune-up and service. By
appointment only. Call 665-3114. 26Z71
'67 HONDA 90 step-through, only 1900
miles. 2 baskets, 2 helmets, $190. 769-
4289. 27244
2 USED BIKES, 1 man's, 1 woman's.
662-2087 after 5 and weekends. 22Z45
FOR SALE - Suzuki 55 in excellentl
condition. Call 662-3116 between 5!
and 8 p.m. 23Z44
'68 OSSA $75. needs some work. Cali
453-8623. ZD48
BUSINESS SERVICES
THESES, PAPERS (incl. technical) typ-
ed. Experienced, professional; IBM
Selectric. Quick service. 663-6291.
42Jtc;

EXPERIENCED secretary desires typing
in her home or part time in your of-
fice. Call 971-1533. 27J43
DON'T YOU just hate to type? Let
Candy do it. Cheap. quick, profes-
sional. Call 665-4830. JD44
EXPERIENCED EDITOR
Skilled in organizing and
presenting special projects,
Write Mich. Daily Box 68 or
phone 971-6445.
J35
EXPERIENCED SECRETARY desires
work in her home. Thesis, technical
typing, stuffing etc. IBM selectric.
Call Jeanette, 971-2463. 12Jtc
TASK
ALL THESES-MANUSCRIPTS-PAPERS
expertly typed-edited
PRINTING - THESES - FLYERS
BROCHURES
economical, 24-hr. round-the-clock
service
FOR ANY OFFICE SERVICE
I call
THE PROFESSIONALS
10 years experience in Ann Arbor
761-4146 or 761-1187-
1900 W. Stadium Blvd.
26Ptc.
MULTI PLE
TYPING
SERVICE
Thesis Service
Papers
Dissertations}
General Office and Secretarial Wotk
Pick-Up and Delivery
Available
Prompt Service
CALL 485-2086
JAc1
PETS AND SUPPLIES
KITTENS and CATS. Cute, trained
FREE, black, grey, or mixed-up. a
variety of sizes and shapes. Call 665-
4830. TD44_
2 FREE CATS
Housebroken-Lovable
665-2565 after 5.
TD44
ROOM AND BOARD T
BOARDERS WANTED. 338 E. Jefferson.
_761 48.11E44

(2 bdrm. unit-summer ' term) WANTis-- Used girl's 3-spd. bike. 761-
Campus area, cool, furnished apart- 4309 24243
ments. 1 and 2 bdrm.-ample park- HONDA REPAIRS, TUNE-UPS. OVER-
ing, contact Resident Manager, Apt. HAULS. Reasonably done. guaran-
102, 721 S. Forest St. 16(tc ,n 94 5

SUMMER RENTALS
Choice Apts. at low rates. Ann Arbor
Trust Co, Phone 769-2800. 22083
SUMMER SUBLETS
761-8055
14Utc
PHOTO SUPPLIES
AT CENTURY
The Best in
Good Used Cameras
WE BUY, SELL, TRADE
Everything Photographic
DARKROOM SUPPLIES
LUMINOUS PAPER
Repairs on all makes
Century Camera
3At our new location>
42B4 N. Woodward, Royal Oak
Between 13 and 14 Mile Rd,
LI 9-6355
Take 1-94 to Southfield Expr. North to
13 Mile Road-then East to
Woodward and North
(Michrigan Bank. Security and Diner
Charges accepted) D
1Dt,
USED CARS
VENERABLE PEUGEOT, $50. 761-8855.
14N4E
1962 CONTINENTAL-as is, $150. Needs
wheels and fuel pump: otherwise in
good shape. Call 663-3482 or 663-5512.
ND4
PORSCHE-1965 Coupe. 35,000 miles, ex-
cellent except for some rust. $2300 or
best offer. 662-0309. 11N46
COMPACT luxury sedan. 1968 Triumph
2000. $895. 761-9180 or 663-9831. 10N43
VW, 1966-Red conver. Radio, good con-
dition. Best offer. 971-0420 after 6
p.m. 971-3708. 12N47
'65 VW--One owner. Make offer. 456-
4967, Clinton. 6N42
'66 FORD Galaxy 500, 2-dr., power
brakes, body and mileage excellent.
$750/best offer. 663-5149. 7N43
'63 DODGE DART in excellent cond.,
$275. Stop by 425 West Washington.
ND45
TICKETS
2 TICKETS. Detroit-London. one-way
July 15, for sale. Call collect 1-359-
8542. - 23Q42
FOR SALE -
DROPLEAF TABLE, 4 chairs, dresser,
man's bureau, twin bed. 761-4949.

Iini
SUN'
FRE
St
w
W(
SAV
di
BE3X
C A.
L
L
an
76
ir
on
fan
COO
10
fr
ma
Porn
WI
slo:
Cal
945
SEX
for

kitchen help hired, as the say-
ing goes, "for the time." Espec-
ially For You ($4.95) is a col-
lection of recipes tested by vari-
ous commercial food associa-
tions, including the Potato Chip
Institute and the Olive Advisory
Board. Again, there is nothing
amiss with many of these re-
cipes: some are excellent, but in
themselves they do not consti-
tute a cookbook. One of the
testers, Knox Gelatin, provides
similar, free recipe cards with
every package of their product,
as gelatin users must know. The
book is garnished with bite-
sized, murky photographs of
busy fingers. Don Fitzgerald's
Easy to Bar Be Cue Cookdng
does not contain any recipe one

tently -high standards of con-
tent and format are maintained
in each. It is just that better,
more complete cookbooks exist
for both cuisines, and at com-
parable prices. Probably the
most authentic Mexican cook-
book in print is Elizabeth Lam-.
bert Ortiz's Complete Book of
1Nexican Cooking, published in
hardcover for the hardcore de-
votee of Mexican food, and ac-
cessible- in paperback for those
who are still making up their
minds (Bantam, 95). As for
would-be Orientalists, the sun-
set book offers a bit of this: and
a bite of that: some recipes for
China, mildly Americanized,
some for Japan, a few for Ko-
rea. But why not go straight to
(Continued on Page 9)

10B45tph
DIVING GEARIWAR
All major brands at discount prices.whc
Ann Arbor Diver's Co., call Mike Wills, bou
885-6032 persistently noons or after 5 the
best, 711 Arch. No. 301. 7845
VOLVO 1448 196--speed. AM radio , tra
plus set of snow tires, about 21,000 Lea
miles, very fine condition. Askings MII
about $2,000. Call 761-0153 after 5:30 this
or leave a messagt at 764-4404. BD43 irni
LOST AND FOUND (ab
-- UNIO:
LOST-Seal-point Siamese female. age 12
2 yr., vicinity of N. Main and Huron.'
July 8. $20 Reward. Call Diane, 769-
5695, after 5 or 764-0411 during the PAIN
day. 18A46 job
LOST?? or stolen!!-12 speed boys e
racing bike. RED, very small frame: NO'T1
make: Legnano. Any information call HO!
r Nancy, 781-0153. AD43I L01

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan