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July 10, 1970 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1970-07-10
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Page Six

2L,
41F

4

4 * 4

1

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

,THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, July 10, 1970

Friday. July 10, 1970

i

Cincinnati de facto segregation
case returns to Supreme Court

IN SOUT H-
IRS checked library files for
borrowers of 'subversive' books

WASHINGTON (W) - The
Cincinnati school case has come
back to the Supreme Court with
a question the justices so far
have refused to answer: Is segre-
gation in northern schools that
is caused by housing patterns
legal.

thrown out three years ago
without comment.
In their latest effort, law-
yewrs Norris Muldrow and E.
Winther McCromm, argue that
northern and southern school
boards should be bound by the
same constitutional standard.

dominantly black and 47 are
mostly. white.
The circuit court ruled that so
long as children are allowed to
attend schools in their home
districts the situation is con-
stitutional.
Judgre Paul C. Weick of Akron

Police11
The lead pipe shown above wast
car Wednesday evening between
Sharrow, '70 Eng. Sharrow said
near S. State at the time when h
one of the officers throw the p
Arbor police department spok
"We've heard nothing about it."
Three awards in poetry spon-
sored by The University of Mich-
igan English department were
presented April 24.
The Academy of American
Poets Award of $100 went to
Lawrence Russ, a sophomore in
the College of Literature, Sci-
ence and Arts, for a poem en-
titled "The Sea." Anne Marie
Brumm, a graduate student, re-
ceived honorable mention.
The Bain - Swiggett Poetry
Prize of $50 went to Ronald
Brasch, a graduate student in
the School of Business Admin-
istration for "Still Life Por-
traits." Mary Baron, also a grad-
uate student, received honor-
able mention.
The Michael R. Gutterman
Memorial Award in Poetry, of
$100, went to James E. Brenner,
a law student, for" St. Albans."
Martin Lahr received honorable
mention.
DIAL 8-6416
ANOTHER OF
DOUBLE ENCORE
PROGRAM -. -
Ia a I

Now seven years old, the suit Cincinnati schools have been speaking for the court, said the
named for Tina Deal, a black legally desegregated since 1887, constitution imposes no "duty"
Cincinnati schoolgirl, seeks to but because of residential segre- on Cincinnati school officials to
establish o n e constitutonal gation, a common facet of bus white and Negro children
standard for all schools, North northern urban living, 20 of the away from their districts to
al _, ~ '~ and South. city's 90 public schools are pre- promote integration.
Lawyers for the Cincinnati
chapter of the National Asso-
ciation for the Advancement of
Colored People are appealing BI(BU Y
from a decision by the U.S. Cir-
cuit Court in Cincinnati that
Itter, toochlreblc o ahiehave a peet
right not to bekbused out of their
tossed out of an Ann Arbor police - districts for the sake of integra-
5:30 and 6:00, according to Paul tion.
d he was driving on Summit St. Though the Supreme Court -Singing the Blues-p
e saw a police car slow down and has ordered the dismantling of Frda & SatfIdaydoors o en 8pm
)ipe out of the window. An Ann segregated school systems in the F ya y
esman reached yesterday said, utnh erd a schooldcied-omr 330 MAYNARD ONE DOLLAR
the North. The Deal suit was
HI
NATIONAL GENERAL PICTURES PresentsThsy
.A a li beautiful
girl's
lifetime
between
the ages
JAQUELIINE BISSET of 19s
costarng and 22.
JOSEPH COTTEN and 22.
AIM BROWVNAs Tommy Mrcott '
SCREEN STORY & SCREENPLAY BY JERRY B$LSON & GARRY MARSHAL.
FROM TH NOVL 'TH( PASIN OF EVIL BY MARK MWS-AN
PRODUCED BY JERRY BELSON & CARRYMARSHALL
DIRECTED BY JERRY PARIS --OM
TECHI4COLO~eC o\ ' ,n.,
A STORY OF
THE TIMES
(Reprinted in its entirety from N.Y. Times,
Thursday, May 28, 1970)
Screen: 'Grasshopper' a Rare Truth
Work by Jerry Paris Los Angeles boyfriend. splits when the Jacqueline Bisset Stars
WtokabyTJeyarsfuture (a bank job and many sound in- Jacquelie Strs
at Local Theaters vestments) seem too dull, and heads for in Girl's Life Story
Las Vegas. She dances in a club and, I don't think the film intends any
By ROGER GREENSPUN after a few adventures; marries a black
If I were to construct a vehicle for former football star (Jim Brown, surely program of maturation through hard
the romantic sensibility in the movies, the most type-cast actor in the movies), times, but Christine at the end suggests
I should avoid all the lush presences of, demeans- herself advancing his career, Christine at the begininng could scarce-
say, "A Man and a Woman," or the mis- and learns she doesn't like domesticity.,Chaveia gin
ty distances of, say, "Elvira Madigan." When her husband dies (murdered in a As a movie, "The Grasshopper" lives
and choose instead the bright colors and hood's revenge for a well-deserved beat- in its visual rhythms, and I am not sure
clear perspectives of Jerry Paris's "The ing) her decline begins in earnest. She that the photographer (Sam Leavitt)
Grasshopper," a film of limited but goes from call-girl to kept woman (for and the film editor (Aaron Stell)
sometimes stunning success. Joseph Cotten). to $50 whore, to ulti- shouldn't share a major credit with the
"The Grasshopper," which opened mate despair in which, with the help of diiector. Nothing else really equals the
yesterday at neighborhood theatres, a flying fool, she sky-writes an appro- handsome montage of Las Vegas shows
does not simply invoke, but actively priate message (which I cannot repeat) that appears early on, but the film re-
seeks to earn its moods. And although it while on the ground, young America ap- peatedly transcends its own vulgarity,
strikes little new ground and discovers plauds and the silent majority faints palyrsu es itsos threaretno
few new combinations, it achieves a dead in its tracks. performances to speak of except for
fairly rare kind of intelligence and As usual among us, failure is more in- Miss Bisset's), and improves upon the
truth in the clarity and fluidity of its structive, more complicated, and more conventions that keep it moving.
style. attractive than success. Committed to
the morality of each moment, Christine Jacqueline Bisset. looks rather like a
The ad copy says it is "the story of is never wise but also she is never more voluptuous Julie Christie, and her
a beautiful girl's lifetime between the wrong, and her very aimlessness. (like role in "The Grasshopper" probably
ages of 19 and 22," and though I would- the many non sequiturs of the plot) has owes a little to the heroines of "Darl-
n't have put it quite that way, the ad a kind of shapeliness to it that justifies ing" and "Petulia." B'ut she seems more
copy does not lie. Christine (Jacqueline imprudence and even indecision on es- durable and forthright, less secretive
Bisset) descends from Canada upon a thetic grounds, and sensitive than Julie Christie, and
better adapted to suggest, without pa-
1970 by The New York Times Company * Reprinted by Permission. thos, tough luck that is more than mis-
fortune and less than tragedy.
When her movie is over, she has got-
NATIONAL ten somewhere; she really has won the
GENERAL FRI.-7:15, 9:00, 10:45 knowledge for which she has lost inno-
Pesets SAT.-5:35, 9:00, 10:45.
SUN.-5 :30, 7:15, 9:00 a iP'TH VoruMv
.. ( 1W=NON ANN ANEoo
1 }FRMATON 719700

ATLANTA, Ga. (MP)-A Treas-
ury Department investigator
said yesterday t h a t federal
agents have been trying to ob-
tain from libraries the names
of persons checking out books
on explosives.
But, said Raymond Hahn, as-
sistant chief special investigator
for the IRS Alcohol, Tobacco,
and Firearms Division in At-
lanta, the practice has been
discontinued because it was
judged impractical.
"The only intent we had was

NGC THEATRE CORPORATION M-Thur. 8:15 only
NOW A NATIONAL GENERAL COMPANY Fri. :30, 10:00
Sat. 1:30, 5:30,
SHOWING FOXVILLa Sun. 1:00, 4:30,
375 No.-MAPLE RD.7694300 8:15
a wadleigh-maurice, Itd. production
technicolor from warner bros.
PASS LIST SUSPENDED
f
CINEMA OUILD
July 10, 11-Fri., Sat.
THE DEVIL'S DISCIPLE
dir.GUY HAMILTON (1959)
" LAWRENCE OLIVIER
" BURT LANCASTER
" KIRK DOUGLAS
Shavian comedy, with its satire of social
norms.
7 & 9:05 Architecture
662-887175c Auditorium
I "illFIA INAN5"

to determine if any of the per-
sons whom we know to be mem-
bers of militant organizations
had checked out reading matter
pertinent to the construction of
explosive devises." he said.
The Alcohol, Tobacco and
Firearms Division is responsible
for enforcement of federal gun
control laws.
Disclosure of the 1 i b r a r y
checks was made in "South To-
day," a publication of the South-
ern Regional Council. The re-
port, compiled by editor Reese

Cleghorn, said agents had been
making the queries .for two
months.
"The result is what we believe
to be the nation's first coor-
dinated effort to gather intel-
ligence information that makes
Americans suspect because .of
what they read," said the report.
The report said some library
officials had been threatened
with subpoenas to- produce in-
formation sought by the agents.
Charlton Rochelle, director of
the Atlanta Public Library, said
he had declined to disclose re-
quested information.
In Chicago, the executive di-
rector of the American Library
Association, David Clift, said
that if IRS agents are allowed
access to such information,
"they can come in next week
and ask who's been reading
books on communism and who's
been reading books on sex."
Clift said he will propose to
the association's executive board
that it isue a policy statement
urging librarians not to release
reader information to govern-
ment agencies exc'ept in re-
sponse to a subpoena.
He said he fears such inves-
Itigations could spread and re-
sult Iin "frightening' c o n s e-
quences.
"If they (IRS agents) can do
this in libraries," he said, "they
can also do it in homes."
The American Library' Asso-
ciation has confirmed that in-
vestigators also were seeking the
names of persons who had
checked out material on guer-
rilla warfare, the "South Today"
report said.

~ne.ws
L * 41ai1x of V,# %* 4
By The Associ
THE NIXON ADMINISTRATI
a loss of federal welfare aid yeste
states to remedy similar failings in
The Department of Welfare hau
and Nebraska into enforcement he
federal laws on welfare uniformity.
"The apparent failure of these
means that families eligible for aid
they are entitled to in light of infls
Twiname, adminisrtator of the depar
service.-
AMERICAN COMBAT DEA'
totaled 61 dead and 463 wounded.
death toll since the week ending De
in action were reported.
For the 60th straight week, Sout
American losses, with 371 killed and 1
According to the Pentagon, the
casualties being born by the South
is assuming a bigger share of the fig
Nixon's "Vietnamization" program.
* *
NO INDIVIDUAL COLLEGE w
to President Nixon on campus un
Wednesday.
Heard, who serves as the Presie
made the statement in denying repo:
bia University and the University c
danger of dying.
STOCK MARKET PRICES i
second session in a row yesterda
The Dow Jones average of 30 in
points at 692.77. The Dow average
nesday.

MATINEE
1:05-3:4!

ES

w1Y 1f1 .

E

EVES.
6:30-9:05

8TH echi P Wn.mo ern E Gaol inq
8TH HAPPY- WEEK !

The 8th Wonder of the Motion Picture World!
We cannot hold it forever.

SEE IT NOW!

SEE IT TODAY!

Hurry!

Hurry!

Hurry!

Y
I.
L
r
n
Ia
'
I;a
It
II

"**** HIGHEST RATING!"
Wand Hot, N.Y.Doily Newt-
A ROSS HUNTER P'O~ '-"
AIRPORT
BURT LANCASTER-"DEAN MARTIN
JEAN SEBERG f JACQEUINE BISSET
GEORGE KENNEDY HELEN HAYES
VAN HEFIN'MAUREEN STAPLETON
AUNIVERSAL PICTURE ITECHNICO OR' Produced in 70MM 1000 AQf
Ml fAff fOMiTTfO

CLOSELY
WAYC E ED
THTRAINS'
DiwpAr*t I Ju eal - A Crlo Pont! presentation.
Disributed by T- Sigma RUiA Pulmuays Company.
AND-
"TANTALIZING AND
HYPNOTIC!"~~~
* *

CLASSIC MA TINEES
each weekend the Fifth Forum will
bring back a popular film--only $1.50
SAT. and SUN., JULY 11 and 12-1:45 p.m.-3:30 p.m.
not continuous with "The Grasshopper
JOHN LENNON and
I MICHAEL CRAWFORD in
RJCH&RD LESTER'S
-.-
TEU)
Richard Lester also directed-"Help," "A
Hard Day's Night," 'Petulia," and "The
Knack"
NEXT WEEK
r Jeanne Moreau in Truffaut's
"The Bride Wore Buck

t
r,
r
;
F
a
1
t
1
l
', L
f
i

THE MIRISCH PRODUCTION COMPANY Presents
CHARITON HESTON ~
A WALTER MIRISCH PRODUCTION THE HAWAIIANS"
U-starrir, Also strring
GERALDINE CHAPLINJOHN PHILIP LAW, MAKO, TINA CHEN
ALEC MoCOWEN cas tE WMuc- HENRY MANCINI screenplay by JAMES R.WEB8
Based on the Rover"Awmir tb JAMES A.MICHENER Produced by WALTER MIRISCH O rected 4 TOM DRIES
PANA VISIOWCOLORHbyDeluxe " G PUnited Arrhns

HELD
OVER!dF

SHOWS
AT:
1:15-3:45
6:20 & 9:00 P.M.

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