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May 08, 1970 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-05-08

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, May 8, 1970
1

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, May 8, ~ 970

_ a
M M M h +isipls li.

NAA CI
By CURTIS WILKIE+
Copyright 1970, Dispatch News Service1
"You play many games like 1
ball and hide-and-seek, but the
best one is 'Indian.' One of the
little Negro boys is called 'Jig.'
He got that name because he
dances so well when the Negroes
play their banjos,
"Jig comes up and says, 'Let
me play.'
"And you say, 'All right, but
you be the captive Indian.'
"'That 'will be fun,' Jig says,
and he goes off gladly to be the
Indian, to hide and get himself
captured."
So goes an account of planta-
tion life in a fourth grade his-
tory textbook being used in
schools across Alabama.
The book, "Know Alabama,"
has been attacked as "racist and
offensive" by the National As-
sociation for the Advancement
of Colored People (NAACP) and
a bi-racial group of Birmingham
mothers.
The Rev. K. L. Buford, Ala-
bama field director of the
NAACP. recently complained to
Gov. Albert Brewer and state

calls Alabama text

education officials that the book
treated Negroes condescendingly
while glorfying slavery and the
Ku Klux Klan.
Buford said he "got the run-
around."
Dr. Ernest Stone, state super-
intendent of education, later
said he did not consider the
book derogatory toward Negroes.
This was after the five-member
mothers delegation appeared be-
fore the state board of education
in February.
The only assurance critics
have received is that a revised
edition of the book will be pub-
lished this summer by Viewpoint
Publications, a Montgomery firm
with George Wallace connec-
tions.
Mrs. W. L. Williams, one of
the Birmingham mothers, said
the new version "was not much
better." She was shown galley
p r o o f s of rewritten material
earlier this year. "It looked like
the only thing they cut out was
the story about the boy named
'Jig'," she said.
References to the Ku Klux
Klan as an organization of
"loyal white men" who "knew

Milliken voices 'seriou
on U.S. intervention in

they had to do something to
bring back law and order" will
apparently remain, although of-
ficials of the publishing firm
will not discuss it.
According to the current his-
tory book, "The Klan did not
ride often, only when it had to.
But whenever some bad thing
was done by a person who
thought the carpetbagger law
would protect him, the white-
robbed Klan would appear on
the streets. They would go to
the person who had done the
w r o n g and leave a warning.
Sometimes this warning was
enough, but if the person kept
on doing the bad, lawless things,
the Klan came back again. They
held their courts in the dark
forests at n i g h t; they passed
sentence on the criminals and
they carried out the sentence."
One line has been inserted in
the forthcoming edition which
acknowledges that "there has
been a 20th Century Klan,"
Mrs. Williams said. But s h e
said she saw no condemnation
of KKK activity.
"It was fun, of course," Mrs.
Williams quipped. She is one of
ts' doubts
Cambodia
Guard or policemen go onto a
campus, the purpose of that col-
lege is thwarted."
Miliken said he intended "to be
all through the state to see what
has happened in California and
Ohio does not happen again."
The Governor cancelled previ-
ous plans to attend today a con-
ference of Republican governors
in Santa Fe, N.M.
Asked whether he felt President
Nixon's policies had alienated
youth in America, Milliken said
"Yes - as evidenced by the prob-
lems on the campus."
He said he felt existing tension
had been "aggravated" and that
"young people tend to believe the
establishment is callous and in-
sensitive" to their problems and
concerns.
Commenting on the primary
election in Alabama, Milliken said
he Was "delighted" by the outcome
and hoped former Gov. George
Wallace "will be resoundingly
beaten" in the runoff with Gov
Albert Brewer.
Milliken repeated his oppositio
to extension of gambling in Mich-
igan by saying he was "very un-
sympathetic"with a proposal ti
license offtrack wagering parlors
in Michigan.
The governor would not say
whether he would veto the bill if
it gets through the Legislature,
but added "I do not look favor-
ably on that bill."

i

the first Negro instructors on
the University of Alabama fac-
ulty and has a son who will be
in the fourth grade next year.
Other sections of the book
which have been criticized in-
clude further accounts of plan-
tation life.
"As you ride up beside the
Negroes in the field they stop
working long enough to look up,
tip their hats and say, 'Good
morning, Master John.' You
like the friendly way they speak
and smile; t h e y show bright
rows of white teeth.
"'How's it coming, Sam?'
your father asks one of the old
Negroes.
"Fine, Marse Tom. jes fine.
We got 'most more cotton than
we can pick.' Then Sam chuck-
les to himself and goes back to
picking as fast as he can."
Alabama during Reconstruc-
tion is described in a section
called, "The Terrible Carpetbag
Rule." It mentions that Negroes
were members of the state legis-
lature, and adds, "The Negroes
were nearly all field workers.
They could not read and write.
-0 They did not know w hat it
meant to run a government."
The textbook was first pub-
lished by Colonial Press in 1957.
That company was later ac-
quired by another Alabama
firm, t he American Southern
Publishing Co., which announc-
ed an intention "to specialize in
printing books stressing the
Southern viewpoint."
During this t i m e a special
legislative committee was form-
ed to promote Alabama-based
textbooks for use in schools.
American Southern, which
handled Wallace's campaign
printing in the mid-1960's, fold-
ed in 1967, and Viewpoint
bought rights to "Know Ala-
bama."
t Bill J o n e s, a former press
secretary to Wallace, represent-
ed the publishers at the 'board
of education hearing and said
the new edition "can be read
with interest and pride by any
t child in any school in Alabama
regardless of race."
Jones was reached this week
at Viewpoint offices by tele-
phone, but refused to discuss
Ythe book further.
"I'm not in a position to talk
e about this," he said. "You can
have a look at it when it comes
e out and decide for yourself."
y r Jones described his position

racist'I
at the publishing house as "a
stockholder." He a n d another
Wallace associate, Ed Ewing,
are said to be major owners of
the firm.
The new edition will be pub-
lished in mid-August, and Jones
said Viewpoint has a contract
with the state to supply the
book for school use.
Although the revised edition
will be put into circulation in
time for the coming school
term, the earlier version is ex-
pected to remain in use for sev-
eral years.
The average life of a textbook
is seven years. and there are
no plans to withdraw the cur-
rent edition of "Know Alabama"
until the volumes are worn out.
'II

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ThiS PIKUJ

LANSING UP) - Gov. William
Milliken said yesterday he has
"serious reservations -honest and
deep reservations" about President
Nixon's decision to send American
troops into Cambodia.
He noted, however, that Nixon
had "facts- and a perspective that
no .other American can have."
Milliken added that from his
own perspective, "I have honest
and very deep reservations about
sending troops to still another
country. I can only hope in the
end this whole matter will turn
out all right."
Milliken declined to discuss
Southeast Asian affairs "in polit-
ical terms,' but spoke at length
about the impact of recent devel-
opments on American and Michi-
gan college campuses.
He said he was doing "every-
thing to avoid sending, the Na-
tional Guard or any other force to
any campus. We must do every-
thing we can to defuse this issue,"
he said.
"The lessonsof KentsState will
not be lost. Ohio's use of Na-
tional Guardsmen will not be lost
on me or anyone else," he said.
Milliken said, "I support legiti-
Daily Official Bulletin
The Daily official Bulletin is an of-
ficial publication of the University of
Michigan. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 3328
L.S.A. Bldg., before 2 p.m. of the day
preceeding publication and by 2 p.m.
Friday for Saturday and Sunday. Items
appear once only, Student organiza-
tion notices are not accepted for pub-
lication. For more information, phone
764-9279.
Friday, May 8
Day CalendarI
Baseball: U-M vs. Indiana (double-
header), Ferry Field, 1:00 p.m.
Tennis: :U-M vs. Illinois, Tennis
Courts, 3:00 p.m.
Placement Service
General Division
3200 S.A.B.
Further information on 'these pro-
grams at Career Planning Division, 3200
S.A.B., Call 764-6338:
Experiment in international living
offers academic year in Tunisia, and
M A. in teaching English as a Second
Language at the center in Brattleboro,
Vermont.
KathrineaGibbs School, N.Y.C., offers
engr. program for college grads, 8 weeks
to gain skills to use your major in in-
teresting jobs, after Sr. yr. or bet. Jr.
andi Sr. yr.
New York University program with
city board of educ., leading to M.A.
in edu., course wk this summer, pt.
time teaching,full next summer study,
and appt. to fill teaching next fall
with some further coursework. Total 44
credits.

mate and peaceful, nonviolent dis-
sent." t
Asked if he endorsed a student's
"right to strike," Milliken replied,
"It depends on the conditions."
"Students have the right to stay
out of class if they want to," he
said, "But no student should be
denied the right to attend class
if he wants to."
Said there was "no assurance"
Michigan campuses would remain
quiet, but he added he was "cau-
tiously optimistic and- impressed
by the self-policing efforts of the
students."
Milliken earlier met with two
Michigan State University stu-
dents, Susan Carter, president of
the Women's Interresidence Coun-
cil, and Harold Buckner, President
of Associated Students of Michi-
gan State University, the campus
student government organization.
He said he wanted to congra-
tulate them and "hundreds and
thousands on the campus" for try-
ing to avoid violence.
Milliken declined to discuss con-
tingency plans for deploying
Michigan's own National Guard
onto campus except to say "I will
if necessary."
Criteria for that order, he said,'
would be to "maintain public or-
der" and protect "the lives of stu-
dents" and property.
"I have steadfastly tried to
avoid being an education czar,"
Milliken said. "When National

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FRIDAY and SATURDAYj
MAY 8 and 9
7 & 9:05 Architecture
662-8871 7cAuditorium
DIAL 8-6416
"The year's ultimate spec-
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Luchino Visconti's extra-
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Damned." It may be the
chef d'oeuvre of the great
Italian director! A rare treat
the film triumphs!"
-Vincent Canby, N.Y. Times

DIAL Shows at
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"ROBERT REDFORD'S
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ONE OF THE FINEST
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-Rex Reed, Holiday Magazine
ROBERT REDFORD
KATHARINE ROSS
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SUSAN CLARK
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SUMMER 1970,
May 8, 9 CHAPLIN FEATURE NIGHT
May 15 16 THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME. 1923. Dir. Wallace Worsley.
Lon Chaney, Patsy Ruth Miller, Ernest Torrance.
A triumph of the grotesque.
May 22, 23 ALL ABOUT EVE. 1950. Dir. Joseph Mankiewcz. Bette Davis,
George Sanders, Ann Baxter. Academy Award.
Bette Davis had her best comic dialogue.
May 29,30 THE NAVIGATOR. 1924. Dir. Donald Crisp. Buster Keeton,
Kathlyn McGuire. Considered, with The General, Keeton's most
ingenious comic masterpiece.
SHORT: The Hoosegow (Laurel and Hardy
une 5, 6 HIGH SOCIETY. 1956. Dir. Charles Walters. Bing Crosby,
Grace Kelley, Frank Sinatra. A soufflet for people not tired of eggs.
SHORT: Excerpts from Safety Last (Harold Lloyd)
June12,1 THE THING. 1951. Dir. Christin Nyby. Kenneth Tobey, James
SArness. Low-keyed, convincing science fiction.
SHORT: Bad Boy (Charlie Chase)
June 19 20 THE PHILADELPHIA STORY. 1940. Dir. George Cukor.
Katherine Hepburn, Cary Grant, James Stewart. Philip Barry tailor
madJe this sophisticated comedy for Hepburn. Academy Award.
CASABLANCA. 1942. Dir. Michael Curtiz. Humphrey Bogart,
Ingrid Bergman, Claude Rains, Peter Lorre. Taut thriller, an
Everest among World War II films. Academy Awards.
SHORT: Sailor's Downfall (Laurel and Hardy)
uly 3 4 THE BLACKBOARD JUNGLE. 1955. Dir. Richard Brooks. Sidney
Poitier, Glenn Ford, Anne Francis. The pioneer of ghetto films.
CARTOON: Wild and Woolfy
THE DEVIL'S DISCIPLE. 1959. Dir. Gky Hamilton. Lawrence
Ju 111 Oliver, Burt Lancaster, Kirk Douglas. Shavian-comedy,
with its satire of social norms.
SHORT: A Couple of Tights (Hal Roach)
THE BIG SLEEP. 1946. Dir. Howard Hawks. Humphrey Bogart,
July 17, 18 Lauren Bacall. One sees this best of private-eye melodramas
several times to sift out the clues and absorb the subtleties.
24THE HORROR CHAMBER OF DR. FAUSTUS. 1962. Dir. George
Juy21Franju. Pierre Brasseur, Alida Valli. Visually startling and with his
animal symbolism, Franju's film shocked the Edinburgh
Festival with its anarchistic concepts.
SHORT: Hog Wild (Laurel and Hardy)
July :31 I MARRIED A WITCH. 1942. Dir. Rene Clair. Fredric March,
Veronica Lake. Charming fantasy of a major director.
Aug. 1 SHORT: Chickens Come Home (Laurel and Hardy)
JEZEBEL. 1938. Dir. William Wyler. Bette Davis, Henry Fonda,
A 78 Fay Baintor. As a rebellious girl in the ante-bellum South, Bette
Davis had one of her strongest dramatic roles. Women's
Liberation should see. Academy Award.
SHORT: What's the World Coming To? (Clyde Cook)
THE MASQUE OF THE RED DEATH. 1964. Dir. Roger Corman.
Aug. 14, 15 COLOR. Vincent Price, Hazel Court. Excellent example of
the newer horror film.
SHORT: A Total Loss (Ben Turpin)
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