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June 24, 1970 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-06-24
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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, dune 24, 1970

Wednesday, June 24, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

DISCIpi
By HESTER PULLINGt
Daily News Analysis
While criticism of the Regents' interim
conduct rules and disciplinary procedures
has abated over the summer months,
student leaders at the University believe
that student dissatisfaction with the
measures point to an inevitable clash with
the administration in the fall.
The leaders predict that the students
will join in concerted action when the
University attempts to try students under
the interim rules. At the present time,

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Fall

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courts composed entirely of students.
However, the University has been reluc-
tant to grant the request, preferring to
leave disciplinary power in the hands of
the faculty within each school and col-
According to S t u d e n t Government
Council President Marty Scott, SGC
members have been meeting with groups
of incoming freshmen in an effort to
"educate" them about the discipinary
issue. Scott says that Council has been
stressing its view that the interim rules
are a "threat" to students.
And, alluding to the fall, he adds, "I
cannot see any case conducted under the
interim rules which will not be disrupted."
Bob Marrone, president of Graduate
Assembly, criticizes disruptions on cam-
pus, but believes that the interim rules
are not the answer.
Steve Burghardt, a member of Univer-
sity Council, believes the discipline issue
centers on the question of power.
"The Regents' action crystalizes once
again the University's autonomous hier-
archy," Burghardt says.
David Brand, president of the literary
college student government, calls upon
students to actively protest the interim
rules in the fall.
"The Regents went about as far as they
could towards establishing a thoroughly
repressive set of rules," David Brand.
LSA student government president says.
"And when fall comes, we will protest.,
Brand added.
Criticizing the interim disciplinary
procedures, Scott says, "Not only are the
rules and procedures not made by stu-
dents when applicable only to students.
but they bring in an outsider--who isn't
a student-to decide guilt"
According to Marrone, members in
Graduate Assembly express dissatisfac-
tion with the hearing officer "because he
would not be exposed first hand to the

BARBER
BILLIARDS
BOWLING
MUGD
STAND

MICHIGAN
UNION
OPEN REGULAR
HOURS DURING
BREAK

Zero Population
Growth
DR. STEPHEN KAPLAN
U-M Dept. of Psychology
Speaking on
"Man's Nature and
His Plight-Psychological
Stress and Overpopulation"
Monday-June 29
7:30 P.M.
ANN ARBOR
PUBLIC LIBRARY

Ashe

to

LAYER Sl

at

Wimi

I-

'!

CAMERA SHOPS
PRESENT:

-Daily-Richard Lee
THE COMMITTEE ON A PERMANENT UNIVERSITY JUDICIARY, a body
composed of students, faculty members, administrators, and two regents, dis-
cusses possible disciplinary systems for the University. The committee is expected
to submit a concrete proposal by the start of the fall term.

David Brand

however, no "fall offensive" has been
planned.
The interim rules and disciplinary pro-
cedures were passed by the Regents last
April in an attempt to curb disruptions
and acts of violence during protests on
campus. The Regents said they would re-
main in effect pending the formulation
of permanent rules by University Council
a student-faculty-administration body.
Reacting to the Regents' action, repre-
sentatives from all levels of the Univer-
sity community were sharply critical of
the complete lack of student and faculty
participation in the decision.
The nature of the interim rules also
came under attack. Students especially
were inscensed over the disciplinary pro-
cedure, which empowers an outside hear-
ing officer, appointed by President Rob-
ben Fleming, to determine guilt and spe-
cify punishment ranging from a warning
to expulsion.
Currently, a Committee on a Perma-
nent University Judiciary has been meet-
ing to draft a permanent disciplinary
system for the University. However, stu-
dent leaders do not expect the committee
to propose a court system which will find
favor with the student body.
Over the past several years, students
have been attempting to secure regental
a p p r o v a 1 of a disciplinary mechanism
where students would be tried before

issue and might gain his information
from a biased media.
University Council's role of formulating
campus-wide rules also could be an im-
portant factor in determining student
participation in discipline at the Univer-
sity. However, some students on the com-
mittee express dissatisfaction with the
Council.
"I doubt if any rules will be formulated
and agreed upon by fall," says Jerry De
Grieck, executive vice president of SGC
and a member of the council.
Another student member of the com-
mittee, Burghardt, finds University
Council "the height of bullshit."
"Students will have to become more
realistic-committees are no good," Burg-
hardt says. "All committees are doing
now is reforming the same old structure."

Whether student discipline is a worth-
while issue has also been raised by many
students.
A spokesman from SDS says they will
not make an issue of student discipline,
"but if a case comes up, we might become
involved."
"In terms of a real change I think
student discipline hinders other more
important issues," Brand says. "I'd ratier
students concentrate on substantive aca-
demic and educational changes instead
of everyorfe being side-tracked-en repres-
sion."
"The University should be more tuned
in to the needs of the community and of
students," he adds,
"However, repression is a reality and-
interim changes at this University tend
to stay a long time."

The WIDE, WIDE WORLD of
Honeywell!

PROTEST TREATY WITH U.S.

Japanese
TOKYO UP)- Radical students armed c
with fire bombs and iron-tipped bamboo J
staves clashed with police throughout
Tokyo yesterday as demonstrations spread
against the disputed Japanese-American E
security treaty.
Police said about 750,000 persons took
part in demonstrations and rallied
throughout Japan in the 11th day of
protests against the treaty which callss
for U.S. defense of Japan and U.S. mill-
tary bases in this country.-
Most of the demonstrations were peace-a
ful, however, except for hit-run attacksk
by radical students in the capital. Scores

battle

wi

of police and students were reported in-
jured in these.
. Some 505,000 persons demonstrated in
1960, with widespread violence, in a vain
effort to prevent passage of the security
treaty in its present form. The pact was
automatically extended-at midnight Mon- -
day.
A local police station was partially de-
stroyed when several extremists evaded
police guards yesterday and threw in fire
bombs in one of many hit-and-run thrusts
against government buildings and em-
bassy compounds.
Police and students clashed before the
British Embassy located near the Diet
Parliament building, a major leftist tar-
get of attack. Police said fire bombs, ap-
parently thrown against them, landed
near but outside the embassy compound.
In front of the Diet, about 2,000 stu-
dents staged a 4-minute sitdown in the
street. -
Police said 314 persons-nmostly radical
students-were arrested throughout the
nation. In Tokyo, 150,000 persons demon-
strated and 500 were arrested, metro-
politan police said.
Tuesday marked the 11th day of den-
onstrations against the treaty which con-
servatives here have hailed as a boon to
prosperity and leftists have denounced as
a threat to peace.
Starting Tuesday, either side may can-
eel the arrangement by giving one year's
notice.
The climax of the protests against the
reaty on its 10th anniversary brought
>ut a counter-demonstration Tuesday by
some 50 rightist college students who said
they were standing guard at the Imperial
Palace.
They marched through the palace plaza
.n downtown Tokyo, claiming they would
ipe out any invasion of the "sacred
sanctuary."
The youths, wearing black shirts, white
nufflers and "rising sun" head bandages,
attempted to march toward Hibiya Park,
where hundreds of leftists were staging
n anti-treaty demonstration.
But they were pushed back, and police

rrpolice
reportedno clashes between the two
sides.
The imperial household closed all eight
main gates to the palace for the day.
About 74,000 demonstrators converged on
the Yoyogi Park next to the swimming
pool built for the 1964 Olympics. The
rally here was called by the general coun-
cil of trade unions and the Socialist and
Communist parties.
From the park, these demonstrators
marched through busy streets, blocking
traffic but-tightly guarded by thou-
sands of police - remained relatively
peaceful and orderly.
Heath heep
racial pollicies
LONDON (-P)-A Conservative govern-
ment under Edward Heath will impose
further restrictions on nonwhite immi-
gration-but will stop short of meeting
demands of maverick Tory legislator
Enoch Powell.
Heath made this clear today by repeat-
ing the party manifesto, published before
Britain's national election: ". . . Future
immigration will be allowed only in strict-
ly defined special cases. There will be no
further large-scale permanent immigra-
tion."
Powell, who romped back into Parlia-
,ment in his Wolverhampton district with
a double majority, wants a complete halt
to nonwhite immigration and a scheme
of government-subsidized repatriation for
immigrants already here.
'Heath scratched Enoch'Powell from his
his list of potential ministers long before
the election for his outspoken views on
the racial question. The size of Powell's
victory in Wolverhampton, however,
prompted many observers to suggest that
Heath must recognize the over appeal of
Powell's policies and give him a govern-
ment role, particularly if the Tories have
a small majority in Parliament.

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America's Cli
WIMBLEDON England 1P) -
American tennis stars into the third
at Wimbledon yesterday in gray gu
European favorites eliminated.
But the man to watch still was
campaigning for his third straight t:
classic.
The two seeds who crashed to
the Wimbledon championships were
and Tom Okker of Holland.
Ashe, 26-year-old former U.S. 4
mond, Va., defeated Yugoslavia's
6-3 in a two-hour marathon wl
rolling backhand.
Other Americans who went thro
Stan Smith, Los Angeles, Calif.; Claz
Dennis Ralston, Bakersfield, Calif.;a
~Ill.
Cliff Richey, listed as America's
bledon, fought like a Texas tiger be:
of Romania's Ilie Nastase, the eighti
6-4, 6-3 - but he had to use all his c
challenge from the San Angelo, Tex.
Laver, meanwhile, continued on
6-3, 6-3 victory over fellow Australian
Bob Hewitt, of South Africa, she
unseeded by knocking out Dutchma
-4, 6-3 on the showpiece centercouri
Earlier in the day, Czechoslovaks
Alex Metreveli of the Soviet Union
at dusk last night at two sets all. Mel
in the resumed game and eliminated
6-5.
Ashe, despite his problems witl
serve, looked the best of the Americar
others faired:
Stan Smith, America's No. 1
Wimbledon, beat West Germany's
6-2, 6-4. Smith, who has been virtu
nis for the past three months wtih
game when it counted in each set.
end.
Clark Graebner, the ninth seed,
round when Romania's Ion Tiriac re
strain at the beginning of the fourth
ing 4-6, 14-12, 6-2.
Dennis Ralston, seeded 15th, st
defeat Australia's Ian Fletcher 4-6, 6-:
Marty Riessen, unseeded at Wim
6-2 victory over fellow American Ji
Calif.
Jim Osborne of Honolulu, fell
British Davis Cup player. Curtis won 6

MICOM BANNKARD
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-TNE lNTERBaNK hRD*

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1115 S. Universit

MERA SHOPS

i

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-Associea eress
PROTESTERS swing iron bars at a group of riot policemen during a demon-
stration at Tokyo's Agabu police station last night. The demonstrators were
protesting the security treaty beween the United States and Japan.

305 S. Main St.
Phone 761-8596

rnone 66 1 V 1

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