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June 24, 1970 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-06-24

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Page Twelve

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday; June 24, 1970

Athletic turds: Youth vote to stave dissent

A&
tr4to n

:43

HOUSTON, Tex. (VP)-Some of the nation's col-
legiate athletic directors say granting of voting rights
to 18-year-old will ease campus tensions.
Others say militants merely will turn to other
campus causes.
Bill Orwig of Indiana, president of the National
Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics, says
the change could be helpful.
"It's one of the big issues with students," Orwig
said. "By removing one of the big issues, you are
removing one of the big problems. Most students want
to get involved in the political process. If 18-year-olds
vote, the privilege will appeal to the rational minds."
Orwig and Wade Stinson of Kansas spoke in an
interview yesterday at the association convention
about the voting bill President Nixon signed Monday.
Stinson says lowering the voting age will salve
some feelings.
"Even if 18-year-olds vote, though, I'm convinced
the student radicals will find other causes," Stinson
said. "Some radicals would still disrupt just for the

publicity they'd get out of it. I'm talking about
people who don't excel academically or athletically."
Alexander Durley, athletic- director at Prairie
View A&M, said there still is danger from the cam-
pus disrupter.
"Even if he gets involved and votes, he still might
not be deterred," Durley said.
"I've already heard about one Negro school where
some problems are expected at football games. The
SDS is supposed to be organizing to work against
college football. There are supposed to be plans already
made, not only for thise year, for next year, too."
Durley said Prairie View has not had too many
problems.
"We have ROTC on campus and both the students
and faculty seem to be proud of it," he said. One of
our football captains for this fall is also a captain in
ROTC. We have plenty of athletes who want to be
as unlike the establishment as possible but they're not
disrupters."

Stinson said not all of the troublemakers at Kansas
have been students.
"Nine-nine per cent of our students don't get into
trouble," he said. "I don't know how we can solve the
problem of the outsider coming on campus and start-
ing trouble. The violence at Kansas has not involved
the athletic department."
Stinson said one athlete was dismissed last month.
In other action the chairman of-the NCAA Bas-
ketball Tournament Committee said he hopes 32 in-
stead of 25 teams will be competing in the National
Championship playoffs within a few years.
"I'm not exactly optimistic, but we'll be discussing
the matter again at our summer meeting in July,"
said Tom Scott, Athletic director at Davidson.
"Some people think the idea has the objective
of eliminating the National Invitational Tournament
at Madison Square Garden, but thatt simply isn't so.
A 32-team bracket is ideal and something must be
wrong if we can't fill one."

Vol. LXXX, No. 35-S Ann Arbor, Michigan-Wednesday, June 24, 1970 Ten Ce

I

DO,

'S

BROKE
IDOCHI1

1

PROTEST

I

METS CLOSE IN:
Tigers
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Home runs
by Tim Cullen, Paul Casanova
and Mike Epstein and a two-
run double by Wayne Corner in
a three-run seventh inning last
night helped the Washington
Senators snap a five-game los-
ing streak with a 6-2 victory
over the Detroit Tigers.
Starter George Brunet, 5-5,
left for a pinch-runner in the
Senators' seventh with a save home
going to Darold Knowles. The a run
Senaors have two victories in Sta
their last nine games, both by two-r
Brunet. ey in
Mickey Lohich, 6-8, and Bru- hits 1
net, were locked in a 2-2 tie seven
when Casanova led off the sev- tallie
enth with his second homer of held
the season. Cullen followed with thef
a single and Brunet was safe on struc
a sacrifice bunt. Two runs came
in on Corner's double. Lolich,
who has not won since May 28, Cubs
has won only two games in two
months. CH
Mets
with
Reds romp last n
CINCINNATI - Tony Perez 12-10
and Hal McRae clubbed homers home
as Cincinnati erupted for four Th
runs in the fourth inning and place
held on to down San Francisco of th
5-3 last night. Natio
Lee May hit his 18th homer Dy
in the sixth inning to provide off d
some insurance. - sentt
Perez' homer-his 26th of the strai
year-came after Tommy Helms Tr
had singled and tied the score gaine
2-2. McRae lashed his eighth Boswe
bC scored
CutbacksWeis
Tu'i
seen at Ti
seek at Gus
ble in
( Tj' iMilw
Wiscnsintory
W ci.CO Rst t lastn
MADISON, Wis. (P--Possible
cutbacks in Wisconsin's inter-
collegiate athletic program were
under discussion yesterday fol-
lowing criticism of the school's
athletic department expendi-
tures. Balti
New
Athletic Director Elroy Hirsch Detro
was unavailable for comment on Bosto
a report from the State Bureau cleve
of Audit which cited deteriora- wash
tion of physical plant and an Minn
overbundance of athletic staff Calif
positions. Oakh
But William H. Aspinwall, de- Kana
partment business m a n a g e r, Milw
said Hirsch has been consider-
ing the reduction of up to a half uostC
dozen sports to a "club" level in Wash
an effort to cut costs. Kans
Aspinwall listed the non-in- Milw
come producing sports which Othe
might be dropped as gumnastics, Kans
fencing, crew, tennis and golf. Chiea
He said cutbacks were also Mnn(
being considered in track swim- Cetr
Ming, wrestling and baseball. ati

hit

the

dust

0
'in

relief

daily
;ports
NIGHT EDITOR:
BILL DINNER
r after May had driven in
with a groundout.
rter Gary Nolan yielded a
un homer to Willie MsCov-
the fourth and three other
before being lifted in the
th inning when the Giants
d an unearned run. Nolan
the Giants hitless through
first three innings and
k out four men.
cropped
ICAGO - The New York
tied Chicago with two runs
two out in the ninth inning
night, then beat the Cubs
on Duffy Dyer's two-run
r in the 10th.
e victory moved the second-
Mets to within 1%/ games
.e first-place Cubs in the
anal League East.
er's homer followed a lead-
ouble by Ron Swoboda and
the Cubs to their fourth
ght loss.
ailing 10-8, New York
d a tie in the ninth on Ken
ell's two-out single that
d Cleon Jones and Al
>s. _ 4
is topped
WAUKEE - Pinch-hitter
Gil's two-out, two-run dou-
the ninth inning, gave the
aukee Brewers a 4-3 vic-
over the Minnesota Twins
night.

A crowd gathers to block traffic last night near the Engineering

Gil rapped his double to left
off reliever Ron Perranoski,
who had just come on after Tom
Hall had hit Phil Roof with a
pitch and walked Tommy Har-
per after two were out.
The Twins led 3-2 after
George Mitterwald had drilled a
two-run homer in the sixth and
Roof had connected in the sev-
enth to edge the Brewers closer.
The Brewers scored in the
second on a two-out single by
Roberto Pena but the Twins tied
it in the fifth on Jim Holt's run-
scoring single after Cesar Tovar
had doubled.

-Associated Press
TIM CULLEN (above) Washington's second baseman flips the
ball to shortstop Ed Brinkman for the out on Al Kaline. The Sen-
ators went on to whip the Tigers 6-2. Below New York Mets Bud
Harrelson and Ken Boswell perform a short bit of Swan Lake in
outing Ernie Banks of the Cubs. The Mets moved within 1 12
games of the lead by outslugging the Cubs 12-10 in 10 innings.

Major League Standings}

By DAVE CHUDWIN
Windows in several University build-
ings were smashed last night as up to 300
people marched through the campus in a
protest against the announcement Mon-
day of widened U.S. air strikes in Cam-
bodia.
Hardest hit was North Hall, the ROTC
classroom and office building, where sev-
eral dozen windows were broken by a
small band of the marchers.
Other University buildings that were
damaged, although not heavily, included
the Physics and Astronomy, East Medical
and Engineering Bldgs. Police re-
fused to give any estimate of damages.
The marchers, lead by members of
several radical campus groups, also block-
ed the intersection of South- and East
University Avenues for about an hour
before peacefully breaking up about 11
p.m.
There was no police interference with
the march although several plainclothes-
men. including Det. Lt. Eugene Stauden-
maier, maintained a close watch on the
protesters.
The Cambodian Day Action Commit-
tee, an ad hoc group which planned the
march, issued a statement after the
event saying, "Last night's activities are
a reaction to the Nixon administration's
decision to expand U.S. Air Force bomb-
ing raids to the whole of Cambodia."
The group promised further action in
the next week "to make sure all the
troops and bombs are out of, Cambodia"
but did not go into detail about specific
plans,
"We will not stand idly by while geno-
cide is committed in Cambodia as it has
been in Vietnam," the statement said.
Last night's march began as about 100

people gathered in front of the Engineer-
ing Arch at 9 p.m. Carrying a Viet Cong
flag several dozen marchers walked down
E. University Ave. urging spectators to
join them.
The resulting crowd walked back to
the Arch and heard two speakers de-
nounce U.S. actions in Cambodia. "Our
business is to get Nixon out of Southeast
Asia," declared a woman.
"We should be in the street to protest
this bombing," another leader of group
said. "The same thing that's happening
in Cambodia is happening here-people
being smashed because they want to live
their own lives."

The speakers linked the situation in
Cambodia to what they described as "re-
pression at home." The Cambodia Day
Action Committee will stage further ac-
tion around the upcoming trial of Black
Panther Bobby Seale and others, they
said.
About 200 people then began the march
down East University Ave. and north
down State St., two Viet Cong flags car-
ried at the head of the procession. Dozens
of-spectators walked along with the pro-
testers along the sidelines.
The protesters filled- the street and
chanted slogans. A number of loud cherry

bombs
shouts
fic was
The
busines
the An
on the
Wallk
toward
onstrat
divider
and beg
As th
9:50 p
dozen s
ing ant
through
The
scatter
and cor
Ave. bE
window,
East M
were sr
The
blocked
East U
people
and tal
A nu
hand I
them
Admini
A coi
and ar
middle
an une
strators
see if
By 10
tion, th
half ho

imo
Yo
oit
on
lan
ing
eso
orn
and
ago
as
Faul

AMERICAN LEAGUE
East
W L Pct.
re 44 24 .647
rk 40 26 .606
33 31 .516
31 33 .484
d 29 34 .460
gton 30s37 .448
W~est
ta 40 22 .645
ia 37 27 .578
S38 30 .559
r24 42 .364
City 23 41 .359
kee 22 44 .333

GB
3
9
11
12%~'
13%

Chicago
New York
Pittsburgh
St. Louis
Philadelphia
Montreal
Cincinnati
Los Angeles
Atlanta
San Francisco
Houston
San Diego

w
35
34
35
32
30
25
West
48
39
36
32
30
30

L Pct.
29 .547
31 .523
35 .500
34 .485
35 .462
42 .373
21 .696
30 .565
30 .545
36 .471
40 .429
42 .411

NATIONAL LEAGUE
East

GB
3
4
5Y2
11%

4
5
18
18
20

9
10qA
15Y2
18%
20

Yesterday's Results
on 5, Baltimore 1
hington 6, Detroit 2
ago at California, inc.
as City at Oakland, inc.
aukee 4, Minnesota 3
r clubs not scheduled
Today's Games
as City at Oakland, night
ago at California, 2, twi-night
nesota at Milwaukee, night
oit at washington, night
eand at New York, 2
imore at Boston, night

Yesterday's Results
Montreal 2, Philadelphia 1
New York 12, Chicago 10, 12 inn.
Pittsburgh 7, St. Louis 2
Los Angeles 7, Atlanta 0
Houston 2, San Diego 1
Cincinnati 5, San Francisco 3
Today's Games
Montreal at Philadelphia, night
New York at Chicago, 2
St. Louis at Pittsburgh, night
Los Angeles at Atlanta, night
San Francisco at Cincinnati, night
San Diego at Houston, night

-Associated Press

Marchers walk up State St. last night to protest Indochina war

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