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June 10, 1970 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1970-06-10
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I

-T-

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, June 10, 1970

Wednesday, June 10, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Co ressman says quell

Congressnrsay'squell
violence with police guns

the-
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

Indians
battle on
two fronts

U

WASHINGTON UP) - The
chairman of a House internal
security subcommittee said yes-
terday police should have fired
on some participants in the
Nov. 15 antiwar demonstrations
in the nation's capital.
Rep. Edwin Edwards (D-La),
the chairman, told a hearing
on the demonstration that he
saw "several instances where
gun fire was not only justified
but required." His c o m m e-n t
came as a film of the demon-
stration was. shown to the sub-
committee.
Edwards' comment drew a re-
joinder from Rep. Louis Stokes,
D-Ohio), who said that police

during mass demonstrations
should not be "judge, a jury,
and executioner."
Stokes said that once the
nation has police chiefs and
National Guard units who
handle -demonstrations as the
District of Columbia police did.
"this country will'be in much
better shape."
Edwards then modified his
earlier statement as saying that
gunfire was justified in two in-
stances in the film and "on spe-
cific isolated individuals." He
said he did not advocate firing
into a crowd.
Stokes said while he did not
condone violence, the country

should make an effort to get
rid of the underlying conditions
which cause it.
Washington Police Chief Jerry
Wilson said he saw no instances
during the Nov. 15 rally in
which gunfire by police was jus-
tified to quell demonstration.
During the November march
two major incidents of violence
occurred, one the night before
the march at DuPont Circle, the
other at the Justice Department,
following the march and rally.
In both instances, large am-
ounts of tear gas were used,
causing people blocks away to
feel its effects.

ILLEGAL SCHOOL DESEGRAGATION in the South will be
-.. w .y w A .s.S ,. . , - A I - 1 e __ J ._ .

virtually eliminated by this fall, according to the Nixon admin- SAN FRANCISCO (A') The
istration's civil rights chief. order to cut off electricity to In-
Asst. Atty. Gen. Jerris Leonard, head of the Justice Department's dian-occupied Alcatraz I s 1 a n d
civil rights division, reiterated yesterday his earlier prediction that Icame from the White House, the
97 per cent of the 3.1 million black students in the 11 southern states Coast Guard says.
would attend school in desegregated systems this fallSince occupying the former fed-
oeral prison last Nov. 20 and claim-
"For all practical purposes, the dual school system as it has ex- ing the land as their own, the In-
isted in the South will be eliminated by Sept. 7," Leonard said in an dians had relied on power from a
interview. cable to a lighthouse on the is-
Leonard's 97 per cent estimate was originally contained in a land. It was shut off May 28.
report delivered last week to Vice President Spiro T. Agnew's cabinet "The White House tord us to
committee on school desegregation. deny electricity to the Indians,"
Capt. Charles Scharfenstein, local
However, the report was recalled by the Justice Department. Coast Guard commandant, t o 1 d
Attorney General John Mitchell said the report had been prematurely newsmen Monday,
released and contained unverified statistics. It was reported that the cutoff
w a s a preliminary step toward
getting the Indians off the island
HARVARD UNIVERSITY PRESIDENT Nathan M. Pusey so that it could be made into a
blasted youthful dissenters yesterday and likened them to the late national park.
_ The Indians had a portable
Sen. Joseph McCarthy. power generator working Monday
In an address prepared for yesterday's baccalaureate service at night.
Harvard, Pusey called McCarthy "A symbol of chicanery, deceit .... On another front, members of.
and diabolical evil,"'and added that youthful dissenters are now using the Pit Indian tribe were arrested
"fear, accusations. strife and excitement" to upset academic com- at Big Bend n30 milesano eao

-Daily-Thomas R.Copi
Kent, Jackson
report finds no

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DIG'
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-
DUNI-
CONTINENTAL
There's a new boss boot onc
tat TyroleansJ, designed in I
hiking, have been taken over b
as their own campus footgear.
pie leathers, genuine Vibram
9 grrrreat in every way!
MAST'S
I 619 E. I

trace of

sniper

WASHINGTON (A'-The head of a federal investigation into the
fatal shootings at Mississippi's Jackson State College, and Ohio's
Kent State University, said yesterday that the probe has not pro-
duced evidence to substantiate stories of snipers.
"At this time we do not have sufficient evidence to support the
presence of a sniper at Jackson State or at Kent State at the time
the firing by the state patrol at Jackson and the Ohio National
Guard occurred," said Asst. Atty. Gen. Jerris Leonard.
His statement directly contradicts the report released last Thurs-
day by Mississippi Gov. John Bell Williams that said an investigation
showed state troopers were shot at by a sniper before opening fire
on a group of students outside a women's dormitory on the predom-
inat3ly black Jackson State campus.
Leonard is head of the Justice Department's Civil Rights Divis-
ion and leader of a federal investigation into the fatal shootings by
law enforcement authorities of the two youths at Jackson State, four
students at Kent State, and six men in Augusta. Ga.
The civil rights chief refused to comment on whether the probe,
in the case of Kent State more than a month along, had identified
the officers or guardsmen who fired the fatal shots.
But he acknowledged, in the ease of Jackson State; that "pro-
cedural problems" had hindered the investigation by FBI agents and
Justice Department lawyers.
Blaming what he termed a lack of cooperation by state officials
in Mississippi, he said, "We are encountering some difficulty in our
investigation of Jackson State."
With clear implication a federal grand jury may be called in
Jackson, Leonard added, "The Mississippi State Patrol has not given
us the weapons that were used at Jackson State nor has the Miss-
issippi State Patrol offered any of their patrol men for interview by
the FBI."
Gov. Williams said in reply to Leonard's statement: "There is
no obligation on the part of, the state of Mississippi, legally, morally;
or otherwise, to furnish hooks, lines, poles, bait, water and fish for
Mr. Leonard's fishing expeditions."
"Mr. Leonard has refused to submit any of his people to our
Mississippi investigating authorities for interview. It's time he learned
that co-operation is a two-way street," Gov. Williams said at a news
conference in Jackson, Miss.
s
N 1
-Associated Press
First aid at Kent State
The Michigan Daily, edited and man day through Sunday morning Univer-
aged by students at the University of sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second carrier, $10 by mail.
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich- Summer Session published Tuesday
.gan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-, tion rates: $5. by carrier, $5 by mail.

munties dust as ccart iy uid.
"Always they insinuate, distort, accuse, their aim being not to
identify and correct real causes, but always rather, by crying alarm.
intentionally to arouse and inflame passions in order to build sup-
port for 'nonnegotiable demands' and, by this means, to enlarge their
following and enhance the power.,",
Pusey blamed the inroads of "deceitful talk and the tendencies
toward coercive action" in part on those opposed to them who re-
mained silent.
NORTH KOREA AND THE U.S. continued yesterday to give
conflicting reports of last Friday's gunboat incident in the Yel-
low Sea.;
U.S. Army Maj. Gen. James H. Skeldon repeated South Korea's
claim that North Korean forces attacked a lightly armed South Ko-
rean vessel south of the demilitarized zone, towed it into North Ko-
rean waters. and are now "illegally detaining" it and its 20 crewmen.
North Korean Maj. Gen. Lee Choon-sun said that the vessel was
a heavily armed spy ship dispatched by the U.S. and that the North
Koreans sank it north of the DMZ.
The U.S. Navy has denied that any American ships were operat-
ing in the area. Skeldon insisted that the vessel was South Korean
and demanded a report on the condition of the crew members and
the prompt return of the men and the boat.
Lee countered with a demand that the U.S. apologize for "dis-
patching the spy ship" into North Korean waters.

trespassing on land of the giant
Pacific Gas & Electric Co. The
Indians say they own the land.
Deputy sheriffs arrested 33 In-
dians Saturday at a company
campground and eight Monday.
In court, at Redding, south of
Big Bend, San Francisco attorney
Aubrey Grossman argued for the
Indians that in 1963 the federal
Indian Claims Commission ruled a
vast acreage in northeastern Cali-
fornia that had been illegally tak-
en from the Indians during the
gold rush.

a

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THE MICHI(

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Patroling in Buenos Aires
Argentine troops ride through Buenos Aires yesterday in an armored personnel carrier in support
of the three-man military junta which seized power Monday, ousting President Juan Carlos On-
gania. The generals who led the coup have promised to install a new president within ten days.
'BRAIN MISTRUST':
University group investigating
activities o U.S. industries

Litter doesn't throw
itself away; litter
doesn't just happen.
People cause it-and'
only people can prevent,
It. "People" means you.
Keep America Beautiful.
-edvertising contributed
for the public good

Student Book Service
NOW OPEN
EVENINGS
7:00-10:30
many nice books
1215 S. UNIVERSITY
761-0700
Open daytime beginning
June 22nd

DEMONSTRATIONS ARE IGNOR
TELEGRAMS HAVE NOT WORKS
THE WAR CONTINUES..
MAKE CONGRESS STOP THE WAR
HELP ELECT PEACE CANDIDATES TO CONGF
COME TO THE
MASS MEETING
MOVEMENT FOR A NEW C
Wednesday, June 10
UGLI Multinurpose Room
"MOBILIZE FOR PEACE"

By ANITA WETTERSTROEM
Is what's good for GM good for the world?"
That is the question a campus group of re-
searchers is asking of General Motors Corp., as
well as of a number of other industrial giants.
And its answer is an emphatic "No!"
Calling itself the Brain Mistrust (BMT), the
group of mostly graduate students was organized
following the Dow Chemical forum in March.
For that confrontation, in which Dow repre-
sentatives defended charges leveled against them
by a panel of faculty and students, various in-
dividuals began investigating all areas of Dow
involvement. These people became increasingly
alarmed at the- extensiveness and character of
the corporation's "anonymous" activities.
Spurred by a common concern over the far-
reaching power and practices of Dow, the hand-
ful of individuals organized and continued their
industrial investigation, expanding their ranks
to about 20 and their focus to to include, at
present, General Motors.
Barry Bluestone, Grad., one of the founder t
of BMT explained the goal of the organization:
"A good part of the New Left has been
arguing for quite some time over what happens
when large companies in the U.S. control not
onlyeconomic activities but political ones as
well."
"We hope the BMT will put empirical facts
behind those statements and will show people
what happens when the economy is dominated
by two or three hundred companies and by no
more than 3,000 to 4,060 people." -

The main efforts of the group are expended
in gathering such information as size, wealth,
products, activities and ties of large companies,
as well as to identify who controls them.
"We want to document all kinds of informa-
tion," explained Don Larkin, Grad., "abuses as
well as good things, but so far, we haven't found
many of the latter."
Most of their data is found in periodicals such
as the Wall Street Journal, Time magazine, Busi-
ness Week and in the companies' own business
reports. They examine practices of discrimina-
tion, pollution, "imperialism," war support and
political control.
Of major concern to Larkin is the extent of
power wielded by a small number of men.
"In a large number of huge corporations,
the power is in the hands of a very few me'
who use it in their own self-interest," Larkin
said. "And abuses are bound to happen unde-
such circumstances."
"Things like pollution are not 'costs' to a
company," he explained. "They are never entered
on a balance sheet," and until lately were never
mentioned to stockholders, he said.
"For GM, the ever increasing number of cars
on the highway is of no interest," Larkin as-
sertedL "as long as they can keep selling cars,.
it's fine to them."
The BMT works to make its findings public.
"We're basically a fact-finding group," said Lar-,
kin, "We hope people will make use of our in-
formation."
See GROUP, Page 10

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