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June 10, 1970 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1970-06-10

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Page Twelve

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, June 9, 1970

Caramba! Soccer goes on as fans- go wild

1Jtfri ijun

43

MEXICO CITY (M)-The big question
hanging over the World Cup soccer cham-
pionships today is: dare Brazil relax in
today's match against Romania.
The former world champions, heading
the Group Three standings after beating
England 1-0, could still theoretically be
eliminated before reaching the quarter-
final round. But in practice their quarter-
final place looks safe. Thus Coach Mario
Zagalo may be tempted to rest his star
forward Pele rather than expose him to
Romania's tough-tacking defense.
The Romanians need at least a draw
to stay alive in the championships. On
the form book they are capable of get-
ting it even with the Brazilians at full
strength. They lost just as narrowly to
England as England did to Brazil.
THE SOVIET UNION, meeting El Sal-
vador in Mexico City's Aztec Stadium,
was reported planning to run up a huge
score to make its mastery of Group One
beyond all doubt.
That would strengthen the Soviet case
if, as some commentators believe likely,
Horton

pressure were put on the International
Federation of Football Association to al-
low Mexico to play its quarterfinal round
in the Aztec regardless of whether it
wins the group or not. Mexico and the
Soviets now have three points each in
Group One and a draw with Belgium to-
morrow would give the host country sec-
ond place in the group.
The England players, camped in Gua-
dalajara, complained that for the second
night running Brazilians fans and Mexi-
can supporters kept them awake with
bongo drums and blaring trumpets. "It's
simply impossible to get to sleep," said
team captain Bobby Moore.
The Mexican-Brazilan Alliance has
come up with a joint chant of "Me-He-
Co-Bra-Zil" which is not just confined
to voices. Car horns blare out to rhythm
in the streets of the capital and in Gua-
dalajara, Mexico's second city.
IN THREE of the four groups it is a
case of if one team produces a surprise
result, and if another does what it is fore-
cast to do, then mathematicians will be

needed to see who goes forward to the
quarter-finals.
With each of the 16 competing nations
having played two games each, only one
group is settled. In Group four at Leon,
West Germany and Peru have gained the
quarters, while Bulgaria and Morocco -are
eliminated.
But the other groups are still up in the
air.
Group One: Two games to play-Rus-
sia vs. El Salvador and Mexico vs. Bel-
gium. The expected results are victories
for Russia and host Mexico allowing them
to gain the quarters.
But if El Salvador and Belgium win,
then Belgium will qualify and goal dif-
ference will split Russia and Mexico. If
Russia loses and Belgium and Mexico tie,
then Mexico will qualify and the goal dif-
ference will decide between Russian and
Belgium.
Group Two: Two games to play-Italy
vs. Israel and Uruguay vs. Sweden. If in
the unlikely happening that Israel and
Sweden both win, then all four teams will
have three points and the two with the

trio

gives

Tig

DETROIT (I P-Willie Horton walloped three home runs
that drove in seven runs as the Detroit Tigers waltzed to an
8-3 victory over the Milwaukee Brewers last night.
Horton's one-man show opened in the first inning as he
hit a grand slammer that wiped out a 2-0 Brewer lead. He
connected for a two-run shot in the sixth and added a solo
blast in the eighth, upping his season total to 10 round-
trippers.
The grand slam came against reliever Skip Lockwood,

best goal difference, determined by sub-
tracting goals against from goals for, will
advance.
Group Three: The two remaining
games-Brazil vs. Romania and England
vs. Czechoslovakia. If Romania and Eng-
land win,'they and Brazil will each have
four points and goals will count.
IF BRAZIL and Czechoslovakia win,
Brazil will qualify but the remaining three
will have two points each and it goes
back to goal tally again. On form, the ifs
should be discounted and Italy, Uruguay,
Russia, Mexico, Brazil, England, Peru and
West Germany will advance after first
round action is concluded.
Meanwhile, police said Monday the first
known slaying caused by an argument
about a game in the ninth World Cup
soccer championship took place in Mexico
City.
Police accused-Epigmenio Sanchez Luna
of Mexico shooting a neighbor when Her-
minio Gonzalez cracked, "Mexico didn't
acomplish anything by beating El Sal-
vador because the Central American team
is a lemon."
rs Win
Royals
KANSAS CITY (A) - Charlie
Metro was fired yesterday as
manager of the Kansas City Roy-
als and pitching coach Bob Lem-
on, former Cleveland Indians
star hurler, was named as his
successor.
Cedric Tallis, Royals' executive
vice president and general man-
ager, made the announcement at
a hastily called news conference
at Municipal Stadium, where the
Royals opened their longest home
stand last night against the
Washington Senators.
The action came little more
Sthan 24 hours after the club re-
sd Pre turned from a disastrous road trip
7't during which it won only one of
nine games. Kansas City is in fifth
place in the American League's
western division standings, 161/2
games behind first place Minne-
sota, with a record of 19 victories
and 33 losses.
"I felt the change was neces-
sary to put us in a position where
t modi- we could improve ourselves,"Tal-
fet lis said.
Y. Miller "In Bob Lemon, we have a man
srd withwho has shown himself to be a
was the very capable leader in his other
managerial assignments, and
Flood, someone who has the advantage
ill Veeck of knowing our personnel as well
y. as the American League."

MAN

Gold

mine

In

Ann

At

who had come in after starter
McLain
files for
bankruptcy
DETROIT (") - Admitting un-
secured claims of about $400,000,
suspended Detroit Tigers pitcher
Denny MLainyfiled for bank-
ruptcy yesterday.
William Aikens, McLain's at-
torney, said the bankruptcy peti-
tion was filed in the U.S. Bank-
ruptcy Court in Detroit after the
pitcher was advised by Aikens
there appeared to be no other
route.
Aikens, saying McLain has vir-
tually no assets, said he advised
McLain that "bankruptcy was the
only course which would enable
him to straighten out his tangled
finances."
McLain, who won 31 gamesfor
the Tigers in 1968. had invested
in a number of businesses which
Aikens said are of questionable
value now.
Aikens said $275,000 of the un-
secured claims against McLain
are contested by the pitchcer, who
is scheduled to return to the
Tigers on July 1 after a three-
month suspension for alleged in-
volvement in gambling.

Vol. LXXX, No: 25-S Ann Arbor, Michigan--Wednesday, June 10, 1970 Ten Cents

CLAIMS

SECRET

METHC

Ray Peters opened by yie
two walks and a single.:
wood fanned Norm Cas:
Horton poked a two-strik,
livery into the left field
and the T i g e r s werei
headed.
Cesar Gutierrez tripledi
third and scored the only
Tiger run on a two-base
The Tigers totalled only si
for the game, but they really
them count, as they strand
a solitary base-runner.
Les Cain, 5-2, got the wir
late-inning relief help from
Patterson.
The loss was the Brewers
straight on the road.
Angels glorious
BALTIMORE (/)-Ken M
len's leadoff homer in the
inning after his error had1
Baltimore tie the game i
ninth, helped the Californi
gels to a 7-5 triumph ove
Orioles last night.
California reliever Eddie
3-1, loaded the bases with
-all on 3-2 counts-in th
but struck out Dave Johnsc
Ellie Hendricks before Mc
connected in the next inni
the game-winner off loser
Hall.
Late Scores
Chicago 7, San Diego 3
St. Louis 4, Los Angeles 0
Pittsburgh 5, San Francisco 1

glding
Lock-
h but
ce de-
seats
never
in the
other
error.
x hits
made
ed but
n with
cDaryl
s' 15th
4cMul-
e 11th
helped
n the
a An-
er the

Gold Ininer Burnell Tindall and his alleged 'diggings.
WILL MEET FLEMING:
Concerned parents group asks U'
to respond to students' demands

By LIN
HAR
A secret method
gold from sand and g
the world's leading g
to a retired Ann Arb
one of four people in
edge of the new meth
Burnell Tindall,
claims the method co
gold from the Ann
from throughout the
Tindall has been
to profitably extract
occur in many sand
Michigan. He now bel
and plans to start I
the Ann Arbor area w
At present Tindall
mental mining, and 1
gravel pit a few mile:
the name Au-Min-C
running through 198
igan, where he plans
beginning in a few m
Processing machin
located on property
Tindall, however, refi
barn. Neither will he
who work with him,
parked by the barn, h
Sources within th
Resources confirmed
use of mercury as an
discuss details of the
Because of possibl
city's water supply, '
scientists from the D
to discuss his mining
Geology Prof. Ed
sure about the allege
says he is "very ske
appreciable concentra
igan,
He added that sma
in gravel pits in sei
posited by Ice Age g
from rock in Canada.
However, Goddard
to have spread the g
impossible to econom
method, including me:
Goddard added th
in gold mining centui
ceive of any major
purporting to use mei
Tindall says he le
from a man in Califo
gold producer in the .
and Silver Operation
partment, however, h
gold producers in Cal
F+ i t
l

-Associate
Tigers' Horton lauded after grand slam
Miller counters Kuhn
at Flood baseball trial

Major League Standings

AMERICAN LEAGUE
East

Balimrnore
New York
+e Boston
Detroit
Washington
Cleveland
Minnesota
California
Oakland
Chicago
Kansas City
Milwaukee

W
36 ]
24
21
West
34
34 2
30
21
20
17

L
19
24
26
'26
29
30
16
20
25
34
33
37

Pet.
.659
.572
.491
.491
.453
.414
.680
.634
.544
.380
.377
.314

GB
' g
9
9
11
13
2
15'
19

NATIONALsLEAGUE
East
W L Pct.
xChicago 28 21 .571
xPittsburgh 27 28 .491
New York 27 28 .491
xSt. Louis 24 26 .480
Philadelphia 24 29 .553
Montreal 19 34 .344
West
Cincinnati 41 15 .734
Atlanta 29 23 .558
xLos Angeles 30 24 .556
xSan Francisco 25 30 .455
Houston 25 33 .431
xSan Diego 25 33 .431
x-late game not included
Yesterday's Results
Chicago at San Diego, Inc.
New York 2, Houston 1
Pittsburgh at San Francisco. in
St. Louis at Los Angeles, inc.
Philadelphia 2, Atlanta 1
Cincinnati 6, Montreal 4
Today's Games
Chicago at San Diego
New York at Houston
Pittsburgh at San Francisco
St. Louis at Los Angeles
Atlanta at Philadelphia
Cincinnati at Montreal

NEW YORK (IP)-Marvin Miller,
Fisher, executive director of the Major
walks League Players Association, con-
e 10th tradicted earlier testimony by
n and B a s e b a l1 Commissioner Bowie
Mullen Kuhn when he was called as a re-
ng for buttal witness in the Curt Flood
Dick case yesterday.
The question that provoked
Miller's response was put to him
by Flood's attorney, Jay Topkis,
who referred to testimony by
Kuhn and John Gaherin, the own-
ers' labor negotiator, that Flood's
suit had halted discussion aimed
at modifying the controversial re-
serve system.
Asked if that conformed with
his opinion, Miller said:
GB "No, it does not. There was no
4 difference whatsoever in discus-
4 sions before news that Curt Flood
4'A intended to file suit or after."
e6 Miller also contradicted a state-
ment made by Gaherin that the
- Players Association had asked
10 that discussions be discontinued
15% for fear Flood's court case would
17 be harmed. Miller contended, in-
17 stead, that he had told the own-
ers' representatives:
"If we were able to agree on
tic provisions, the plaintiff (Flood)
would withdraw his suit. The
statement (Gaherin's) was com-
pletely inaccurate - it was quite
the reverse. We said if there were
appropriate amendments t h e r e
would be no action."
Miller then was asked whether
he was in accord with testimony

by Kuhn and others tha
fying the system would af
level of the sport's integrity
said he was not in acco
that opinion.
Topkins said Miller w
next-to-last witness for
with former club owner Bi
closing out testimony today

A Sports Editorial
MUHAMMED ALI, also known as Cassius Clay, has un-
wittingly managed to confuse the media in a man-
ner that would make Spiro proud.
The AP, UPI, and all the television and radio net-
works are somehow still oblivous to the fact that Clay,
uh-Ali, changed his name quite a few years back when
he joined the Black Muslim sect. All the stories on Ali
in the media refer to him as Cassius Clay, with occa-
sional mention of the fact that he is "also known" as
Muhammed Ali.
Why the media reserves such special treatment for
the ex-champ is hard to understand. Archie Leach,
known to his intimates as Cary Grant, and Irving Sch-
wartz, known to effete snobs as Tony Curtis, receive no
hassle from anyone. Even Malcolm Little changed his
last name to'X without an eyebrow being raised.
Perhaps if the World Boxing Association, long known
for its liberal humanitarianism, made some official an-
nouncement to the effect that yes, Virginia, there is a
Muhammed Ali, all this could be straightened out.
-L. K.

By CARLA RAPOPORT
Representing some 700 parents of
University students, members of the
recently formed Parents in Support
of Students will meet with President
Robben Fleming next week and call
upon the University administration
to "respond constructively to legiti-
mate students demands."
The group of parents, based in
Detroit, organized last February to
protest the presence of police on
campus, who had been called to
patrol recruiter disruptions at that
time.
With the disturbances which swept
the nation's campuses last month
and the resulting four deaths, the
organization's numbers subsequently
swelled.
"Many parents join our group be-
cause they are looking for a way to
express their empathy with the stu-
dents," said Mrs. Nathaniel Brooks,
a sponsor of Parents in Support of
Students.
"We are a watch-dog committee so
that our young people don't get
knocked around by establishment
practices. We are concerned about
our children and thus hope to be a
unified front against the repression
and police violence aimed at them,"
said another sponsor of the group.
Since it began, the group has tried
to maintain continual pressure on
the University administration. In
March, several members met with
two University vice presidents to
express their fears of what they
believed to be escalating police re-
pression and brutality on campus.

A member of the group explained
that she felt the vice-presidents at
that time were generally unrespon-
sive and out-of-touch with the pres-
ent issues facing students.
When the representatives of the
parents' group meet with Fleming
next week they will strongly suggest
to the president that the University:
-Act not as a neutral institution
above strife but as an advocate of
the students;

-Seek to constructively resolve all
problems and avoid calling upon po-
lice forces;
-Refuse to permit police on cam-
pus who have removed their badge
numbers;
-Initiate c r i m i n a 1 complaints
against those officers guilty of mis-
conduct and brutality;
-No longer provide University fa-
cilities to job recruiters.

Yesterday's Results
Chicago 4, Boston 2
Kansas City 8, Washington I
California 7, Baltimore 5, 11 inn.
Oakland 5. Cleveland 2
New York 5, Minnesota 2
Detroit 8, Milwaukee 3
Today's Ganes
Boston at Chicago
Washington at Kansas City
California at Baltimore
Oakland at Cleveland
Minnesota at New York
Milwaukee at Detroit

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