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July 10, 1973 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-07-10

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Page Two

THE SUMMER DAILY

Tuesday, July 10, 1973

tv.^
tonight
Note: Taped coverage of the Water-
gate hearings may pre-empt regular
programming on some channels this
evening.
6:00 2 4 7 11 13 News
9 Courtship of Eddie's Father
20 Stagecoah West
24 ABC News-Smith/Reasoner
50 Flintstones
56 Chan-ese Way-Cooking
6:30 2 11 CBS News-Roger Mudd
4 13 NBC News-john Chancellor
7 ABC New-Smit/Reasoner
9 I Dream of Jeannie
24 Dick Van Dyke
50 Giligan's Island
56 How Do Your Children Grow?
7:00 2 Troth or Consequences
4 News
7 To Tell the Truth
9 Beverly Hillbillies"
11 To Tell the Truth
13 What's My Line?
20 Nanny and the Professor
24 Bowling for Dollars
50 I Love Lucy
56 Fretch Chef
7:30 2 What's My Line?
4 You Asked For It
7 11 Price is Right
9 Wacky World o Jonathan
Winters
13 Truth or Consequences
20 Rifleman
24 Adventurer
50 Hogan's Heroes
56 Changing Music
8:00 2 11 Maude
4 13 Movie
Incident on a Dark Street
(1972)
7 The Littlest Junkie: A Chil-
dec's Story-Documentary
9 Sloan Affair
20 Burke's Law
24 Temperatures Rising
56 Evening at Pops
50 Dragnet
8:30 2 11 Hawaii Five-O
-7 24 Movie
Lieutenant Schuster's Wife
(972)
50 Mv Griffin
9:00 9 News-Don Daly
20 There is an Answer-Religion
56 International Performance
9:30 2 11 Movie
"Call to Danger (1973)
9 It's a Musical World
20 Seven Hundred Club
10:00 4 13 NBC Reports -
Special: The Sinai Peninsula
and its inhabitants
7 24 Marcus Welby, M.D.
9 Ascent of Man-Documentary
50 Perry Mason
56 Detroit Black Journal
10:30 56 Legacy-Documentary
11:00 2 4 7 11 13 24 News
9SCBC News-Lloyd Robertson
50 One Step Beyond
11:30 2 11 Movie
"On the Town" (1949)
Gene Kelly, Frank Sinatra,
Ann Miller
4 13 Johnny Carson
7 24 Dick Cavett
9 News
20 New Directions
50 Movie
"In the Good Old Summertime"
(1949) Judy Garland, Van
Johnson
12:0M 9 Movie
"The Bachelor and the Bobby-
Soxer." (1947) Carl Grant,
Myrna Loy, Chirley Temple
1:00 4 13 News
7 Reading Dynamics
1:15 7 News'
1:30 2 Movie.
"Espionage in Tangiers"
(Spanish; 1963)
11 News
3:00 2 News
ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATER
NEEDS EXPERIENCED
DIRECTORS, SET LIGHTERS,
AND COSTUME DESIGNERS
Those interested
send resume by
July 15th to
AACT Box 1993
Ann Arbor 48106

FILM BIAS CITED

Perry: 4
EITOR'7 NOTE: To screenwriter
Eleanor Pr:, tIo many women are
playIng "'ouj.,'0eous" roles in films:
"They are u''C, murdered, hacked
apart while nude, or they wat on
some man." She says she tries to
write women's roles with meaning.
Problem: To find the actresses to
play themo.
By EVE SHARBUTT
AP Newsfeatres Writer
NEW YORK - Screenwriter
Eleanor Perry is a small wo-
man who has grappled with a big
issue for most of her years in
film: Where are good roles for
women?
She's tried to answer it in her
Work.
"IN THESE DAYS when you
hear on all sides that nobody's
writing good roles for women, it's
all I've ever done." Perry says.
Perry, who wrote the screen-
plays for "David and Lisa,"
"Last Summer," "Diary of a
Mad Housewife," and "The Man
Who Loved Cat Dancing," won
an Emmy award this year for
her teleplay, "The House With-
out a Christmas Tree."
She was interviewed in her New
York apartment, where stacks
and stacks of books line the walls
and are piled on end tables
A DIRECTOR had just called
about her screenplay of Joyce
Carol Oates' novel, "Expensive
People." He wanted to start
filming immediatel. and she was
delighted that he saw what she
had tried to do in the screen-
play.
"It's fine. It can have such
great scenes for an actress. Noth-
THE SUMMER DAILY, summer edi-
tion of The Michigan Daily
Vol. LXXXII, No. 36-S
Tuesday, July 10, 1973
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. News phone
764-0562. Second class postage paid at
AnnArbor, Michigan 48106. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 May
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by-carrier (cam-
pus area); $11 local mnal (Michigan and
Ohio); 13 non-local mal (other states
and foreign).
Summer session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Suhscrp-
tion rat: d$5. 0yb carrier (campu
area) $6.50 local mail (Michgan and
Ohio); $700 non-local mal (other
states and orelig)
Bach Club
presents
RAY SEALEY,
Well-known
Canadian guitarist
Performing 400 years of
guitar music, works of
Narvaez, Nueserdler,
Weiss, Sor, Torroba.
Ice Cream with fresh
fruit topping served
afterwards.
donation 50c or
whatever you can afford
THURS., JULY 12
8 p.m.
730 Tppon
(Memorial Christian Church)
Further info. 663-4875 or
769-1605

Creating
ing is greater than a really good
director who sees what you
mean," she said.
On her way to a holiday in
southern France, Perry said she
was finishing a film for Academy
Award nominee Cicely Tyson in
which the actress plays a black
congresswoman.
"TENTATIVELY, we've called
it 'Clout,"' she said. "And it will
be something of what I used to
love in movies add miss today.
Remember those'Tracy-Hepburn
films, groovy love stories with
ups and downs and characters
who swing with them? This will
be similar. There'll be an under-
current of politics, but the love
story comes first. We'll have a
television broadcaster and a
Portia-like Congresswoman."
Perry thinks the situation of
women in films today is "just
awful, or, to use a stronger word,
outrageous." For one thing, wo-
men in movies today seem much.
alike to her.
"They have long hair and great
bodies. They get used, murdered,
hacker apart while nude, or they
wait on some man. They never
have impact.
"NEVER DO YOU feel, 'This
is a human being.' And so many
directors are culpable. The new.
thing, now, is that women are

women
supposed to be raped and en-
joy it. That's a director's idea.
Hal" In recently released "The
Man Who Loved Cat Dancing",
Perry lost a fight over a rape
scene. It was in the novel, but
Perry's conception of. the char-
acter in the screenpllay did not
include rape.
"She was independent, a sort
of 1880s liberated woman. I
thought she would defend herself;
she would not be raped. But the
director and my co-producer
thought otherwise. The rape
scene is in the film. One of the
men told me, 'Well, rape turns
some men on. .
The problem she added, is that
as a screenwriter she has no au-
thority. Even as a co-producer,
as she was billed on "Cat Danc-
ing," she exercised little author-
ity.
Perry grew up in Cleveland,
Ohio, and had what she calls
"another whole life" there. She
married young, to a lawyer, and
had two children.
"WHEN I was growing up, I
remember that boys took shop
while I studied sewing. I ripped
up one towel 38 times, and would
have much preferred playing
baseball. I hated to sew. My
mother used to tell me no man
would ever want to marry me. So

s roles
I married early and might have
gone on forever with charity
work if the war hadn't come
along. I wasn't satisfied or hap-
py, but I didn't know what to do
about it."
What she finally did was flee.
She moved to New York, obtained
a divorce, began writing, met and
married director Frank Perry
and spent 10 years working pri-
marily with him.
Now they are . divorced,. and
she has another "new life,"
which she says is in some ways
better than the ones before.
"YOUNG WOMEN are so dif-
ferent today. I admire them.
My own daughter doesn't take
anything for granted and I'm try-
ing to imitate her. Many things
are changing and getting better.
Even women my age are more
open to change than before.
One thing which concerns the
screenwriter more today than
ever is this: After all those roles
for women, real women, are
written, where does she find ac-
tresses to play the parts?
"Have you noticed," she said,
"that the new girl in town, this
year's 'find', is 18 to 22? But
they all look alike, and they're
gone tomorrow. Where are those
actresses of 30 to 35 to be to-
day's women?"

BOX OFFICE NOW OPEN
REPERTORY in the
air-conditioned
POWER CENTER
WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE'S rollicking case of mistaken identity
The Comedy of Errors
GEORGE BERNARD SHAW'S amusing and poignant comedy
Mrs. WrensP rofessiont
TENNESSEE WILLIAMS' vivid American drama
Cat On A Hot Tin Roof
NEWLEY and BRISCUSSE'S delightful musical
The Roar of the Greasepaint,
the Smell of the Crowd
PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE
Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday
July 17 July 18 July 19 July20 July 21
Comedy Mrs. Warren's Comedy Mrs. Warren's Comedy
July 4 July 25 July 26 July 27 July 28
Mrs. Warren's Comedy Mrs. Warren's Comedy Mrs. Warren's
July 31 August 1 August 2 August 3 August 4
Cat Cat Cat Cat Cat
August 7 August 8 August 9 August 10 August 11
Greasepaint Greasepaint Greasepaint Greasepaint Greasepaint
-Season Subscriptions-
OFFER SAVINGS-PREFERRED LOCATIONS
FOUR PLAY SERIES $10.50 (center) $7.00 (sides)
INDIVIDUAL PERFORMANCE
TICKETS NOW AVAIL ABLE
POWER CENTER BOX OFFICE OPEN
12:30 - 5:00 P.M. Phone 763-3333

SPECIAL! HOT CHOCOLATE
Everyone Welcome.
GRAD
COFFEE
HOUR
WEDNESDAY
8-10p.m.
'West Conference
Room, 4th Floor
RACKHAM

LOTS OF PEOPLE

LOTS OF FOOD

LOTS OF PEOPLE LOTS OF FOOD

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