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June 22, 1973 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-06-22

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Page Eight

THE SUMMER DAILY

Friday, June 22, 1 973

BREAKFAST IN PRISON
Two days at the Washtenaw Jail

Cout inued fromu Pig- '3;
Rebecca screams, "Keep banging till they
come," because Louise is vomiting and
has passed out again.
So you keep screaming and you're get-
ting hotter and hotter because you can
hear them jingling the keys down the hall
and you know they can hear, but they
won't come.
AND REBECCA'S saying, "You can die
in this fucker. I told you, you could die
and they'd never come."
And suddenly you get scared because
you know it's true and you feel like lying
down and crying. Instead you look over
at Louise and she's sitting with her head
in a towel and says that she feets better
so you stop yelling.
Then you see the clock and realize that
you've been banging for 20 minutes.
THE TURNKEY comes about half an
hour later to take Louise and the grey
haired woman to court. Before Louise
leaves she- says, "You're still young, girl
-listen to Louise-live fist and die old.
Be an old corpse. I don't know if I'm
gonna make it."
Rebecca's face has a dark look but no-
body says anything. Instead you sit back
on the floor and light up a cigarette.
You know the day is just beginning.

THE TURNKEY is coming back down
the hall and you wonder if it's your turn
to go to court, but it's just a bucket being
pushed into the cellblock.
You wonder how long you'll have to wait
and it makes you fidgety. Rebecca notices
and says, "Don't worry, girl, this is all
we do-we eat, we sit down and we lie
down-and we wait."
She's silent for a few minutes then
adds, "I sure wish I was home."
You wish you were home too, but you

don't say it. You just light another ciga-
rette and wait.
FINALLY THE MATRON comes while
you're lying on your back in your cell
looking at the ceiling and she says, "Come
on, you're going to court."
You get up to follow her -to the door,
but it's hard to walk because your legs
are shaking so bad. You can't hold vour
cigarette, so you drop it in the toilet. The
matron's got the door held open with her
foot waiting for you to come and you

don't know what to think.
Finally you feel calmer-you know you
have to go-that the waiting is finally
over for now.
YOU LOOK AT Rebecca and you want
to say something, but you can't because
you know she's got seven more months.
So she says it. "Listen girl, you keep
cool, 'cause I don't want to see you in
here again. Keep cool girl, keep cool"
You smile and f o I1 o w the turnkey
through the door.

Inflation remains unchecked

WASHINGTON (AP) - The sharpest in-
flation rate in 22 years continued its rap-
id pace in May as the buying power of
American workers fell again, the gov-
ernment reported yesterday.
The Labor Department said higher
prices for food, clothing and gasoline
pushed the cost of living up six-tenths of
1 per cent, a rate slightly less than the
seven-tenths of 1 per cent recorded in
April.
This works out to an annual rate of 7.2
per cent, down from the 8.4 per cent an-
nual rate of increase projected in April.
PRESIDENT NIXON'S chief economics

adviser, Herbert Stein, said the figures
show inflation "subsiding from its earlier
peak but still much too high and sub-
siding too slowly"
AFL-CIO President George Meany, as
usual, wasn't happy about the figures
either. He noted the decline in consumer
purchasing power and said "the economic
fact of life for workers and their families
is what they can buy with their pay-
checks."
The Bureau of Labor Statistics said
after-tax take-home pay of rank-and-file
workers averaged $125.12 in May, up 87
cents from April and $14.51 from a year

ago. But it calculated that inflation re-
duced real spendable earnings of these
workers four-tenths of 1 per cent in May
-the fifth decline in the past seven
months.
NIXON'S 60-day price freeze announced
earlier this month is not expected to be
reflected in price reports until midsum-
mier.
However, the May figures reflect the
full impact of the ceiling imposed on meat
prices March 29. From April to May, meat
prices declined one-tenth of 1 per cent,
following huge jumps earlier this year.

SHOULD BE INTERESTING
HEENE, England (UPI) - The parish church's magazine is ex-
pecting circulation to rise when the Rt. Rev. Tony Potter writes about
his recent Yugoslavian holidays in the next issue.
The article will detail the foul-up in reservations that stranded
him and his wife on an island nudist colony, Potter said.
WOMEN and EDUCATION
* School of Education Course No. G 598 (Div. 214
Sec. 001 2 credits) .
" No prerequisites-open to undergrads and grads
in any school.
TIME: Monday and Wednesday 7-9 p.m.
PLACE: School of Education Room 2320
OBJECTIVES OF THE COURSE:
1) To encourage women and men to become
positive catalysts for educational reform.
2) To aid teachers in the implementation of true
learning and growing atmosphere.
"WOMEN and EDUCATION" will utilize resource people from
the University community to promote awareness in such areas as:
History of Women in Education Alternative Life Styles
Sexism in Public Schools Youth Liberation
Changing Roles of Women Psychology of Men and Women
in Society Linguistics: Male and Female
Sex-Role Stereotyping in - Women-Medical Awareness
Textbooks Women and Self-Defense
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL: Mary Feldstein 761-3957;
Linda Hallman 761-8680; Barb Stellman 761-8680.
or visit the SEI Office, 1234 School of Education

DENNIS HOPPER
WARREN OATES
PETER BOYLE
& BEN JOHNSON
inD BU
K'D BL

.' 's t
"
,aa
.<

KID BLUE
WASN'T
BORNED
TOBE

Get to know the two of
you before you become
the three ofyou.
Get to know what you both really like.
What you both really want out of life.
Get to enjoy your freedom together until you both
decide you want to let go of a little bit of it.
But make it your choice.
Research statistics show that more than half of all
the pregnancies each year are accidental. Too many
of them, to couples who thought they knew all about
family planning methods.
Get to know how the two of you don't have to
become the three of you.
Or the four of you. Or...
Planned Parenthood
Children by choice. Not chance.
For further information, write Planned Parenthoo4,
Box 431, Radio City Station, New York, N.Y. 10019.
Planned Parenthood is a national, non-profit organization dedicated to providing41
information and effective means of family planning to all who want andneed it.
advertising contributed for the public good wawa

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with contemporary values
and emotions instead of
old - fashioned c o w b o y'
m ov ie cliches. Original,A
off - beat, touching, a n d P
very often funny."j
Red Reed
OPEN 1 P.M.
SHOWS DAILY
at 1 :15-3:10-5:05
SOON:
231 . STATE James Bond 007 in
DIAL 662-6264 "LIVE & LET DIE"

I

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