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June 22, 1973 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-06-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE SUMMIER DAILY

Page Nine I

THE SUMMER DAILY Page Nine -

Nixon, Breshnev

nuclear
WASHINGTON (A) - The Unit-
ed States and the Soviet Union 1
yesterday signed an agreement ofI
principles designed to permantlyc
limit nuclear weapons'by the end
of 1974.
President Nixon and Communist I
leader Leonid Brezhnev signed I
for their nations at the White 1
House. The agreement, the out- I
standing accomplishment of their
summit talks, was cemented at
the President's Camp David re-t
treat in the Maryland mountains.-
THE TWO NATIONS agreed as
a matter of principle that ef-
forts by one or the other to ob-
tain a nuclear advantage would
be inconsistent with the goal
of strengthening peaceful rela-
tions.
The agreement is designed to
spur negotiators for both coun-
tries at now-recessed talks in 1
Geneva. Significantly, the armas I
limitation envisioned by the end
of next year would include not
only numbers but the quality
of the missiles themselves.
Nixon and Brezhnev also agreed
that limitation of strategic of-
fensive arms must be subject
to "adequate verification." Both
nations would be permitted to
modernize and replace weapons
only under conditions to be
agreed upon at Geneva.
AT THE SAME TIME, Nixon
and Brezhnev signed a 10-year
pact to expand cooperation be-
tween the two countries on peace-
ful uses of atomic energy. It
succeeds a series of two year
agreements.
The major areas of the joint
arms effort include: (1) control-
ling thermonuclear fusion; (2)
research on "fast breeder" reac-
tors which create more fuel than
they consume; (3) research on
the fundamental properties of
physical matter.

weapons
Nixon and Brezhnev flew down that thi
by helicopter from the Catoctin cating t
Mountains to sign the historic do- only th
cument on the fourth day of their but its
summitry. A similar arms under- At a
standing between them in 1971 that th,
produced, when Nixon went to and we
Moscow to see Brezhnev last ity." H1
spring, an initial but limited nuc- lip to 1
lear weapons agreement. the coi
HENRY KISSINGER, the Pre- mining
sident's national security adviser, numbei
told newsmen that Nixon a n d weapon
Brezhnev are convinced an ex- On at
panded agreement by the end of firm in
1974 would be "a major contri- would
bution in reducing the danger of ity int
an outbreak of nuclear war." allies, 1
He said they were agreeing for mis
now to seven basic principles out ines w:
of "sense of urgency."
The presidential adviser declin- THE
ed to predict a specific ban or in Ger
limitation on multi-targeted nuc- and ar
lear warheads, but he said these unders
MIRVs would be a principal sub- vide an
ject for negotiations at Geneva. tiations
IN AGREEING to seek quali- estimal
tative controls, Kissinger s a i d be rea

s gn
pact
e two countries were dedi-
hemselves to limiting "not
e pace of the arms race
nature."
nother point he declared
e United States "will seek
will attain strategic par-
3e added that it would be
the negotiators to resolve
mplex question of deter-
parity by considering both
rs and quality of nuclear
ns.
nother point, Kissinger was
saying the United States
never separate its secur-
erests from that of its
hinting strongly that bases
siles and nuclear submar-
ill be maintained abroad.
CURRENT SALT talks
eva have become static
e now in recess. The new
Landing is designed to pro-
imoetus for positive nego-
. Knowledgeable observers
te the second pact would
dy by the end of 1974.

NrPhoom
SOVIET LEADER Leonid Brezhnev and President Nixon walk
from their helicopter to the White House yesterday as they returned
from Camp David, Md., to sign an "agreement on principles" re-
garding limitation of nuclear weapons.

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