100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 22, 1973 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-06-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Summer Daily
Sunnr Edilion of
TiI1 MiKCHIGAN DAILY
Edited and managed by students at the
University of Michigan
Friday June 22, 1973 News Phone. 764-0552
Porno laws unjust

Learning Exchange: a way to
learn and teach various skills

By TOM DRAGOSAVAC
fAVE YOU ever wanted to learn
the fine art of high-diving off
bridges? Or perhaps the more
subtle art of tapping telephones?
Did you ever wish you could blow
erotic smoke-rings? have you ever
simply gotten sick of the oft-en-
slaving cyclops that perhaps dom-
inates your living room and an
uncomfortable chunk of your day,
but don't see readily available al-

doesn't?) that you want to help
another learn for perhaps barter,
or money, or just for the pure joy
of sharing and relating; if there is
some subject, topic, or activity
(anything at all) that you'd like to
learn more about or how to do;
if you'd like to find someone who
shares a certain interest of yours
or people to do your thing with;
if any of these things, then the
Learning Exchange can help you.

months or so the Exchange has
been growing have come to welt un-
der $100.
THE FILE NOW has over 350
people who have called in about
190 topics. The variety is impres-
sive. A brief sampling includes
people who want to teach African
culture, Ann Arbor lore, beer-mak-
ing, brick-laying, computers, de-
coupage, editing, first aid, hula,

IN A 5-4 vote to redefine pornography, the Supreme ternatives? Don't call your psychia- Toe iearnsng Exchange consists legal self-defense, macrant
Court yesterday' struck a rather unfortunate and trist. Call the Learning Exchange. of just four things: a telephone, a occult, making money onr
unjust blow to individual freedom. The decision, by se- offer.iig-making, and a v
verely restricting the amount of pornography protect-- 've......... On the other hand, ther
able under Constitutional law, can only prove to be an- To tats these learning resources that we col- people seeking teachers fi
other sort of unwelcome censorship. lectively have and individually lack peoplepainting, pottery and ceri
Under the new definition, material does not have toW i C peopl cybernetics, car driving, cc
be proven utterly without redeeming social value to be must have a way to get touch with each electrical work, gymnastics
pornographic, but rather must be shown to, as a whole, other. The Learning Exchange exists in Ann chic powers, sailing, tattoo,
lack "serious literary, artistic, political, or scientific Arbor to facilitate this contact. craft, and country violin.
value." As such, even much legitimate media is perhaps People have already beenn
doomed to be tagged "pornographic." ead to pur , ae few
mechanics, ballet, bee-key
W E OPPOSE censorship of any sort. It is interesting to Ann Arbor is a very large world file box, a pittance, and a few book-binding, chess, croct
note that censorship against pornography began with a relatively small population. volunteers. You call. A volunteer several languages, folk si
years ago to shelter the individual from "damaging ex- The range and diversity of skills, answers and gives you the name varieties of music and art,
knowledge, interests, and pastimes and number of person or persons sage, mushrooms, photography
posure" to material that could arouse "prurient interests." to be found in this cosmopolitan lit- who share your cup of tea or com- chology, science fiction, t
After all, sex at one time was culturally acceptable only tle town (that we fondly call our plement your desire. If by some water-skiing, yoga, and cr
for procreation, and it was thus the duty of the society "community") is, no doubt, quite chance no one has previqusly call- writing. People may be looki
to protect its citizens from anything which might en- impressive. The problem is in the ed to teach the art of erotic you.
courage (horror.) an enjoyment and appreciation of phrase. "to be found". smoke-ringing, your name, number, The Learning Exchange pu
To tap these learning resources and interest are filed in the ex- in touch. You make your ow
human sexuality. that we collectively have and in- pectation that the person you are venient arrangements. Some
However, we're in 1973 now, and sex has finally been dividually lack, people must have looking for will call, as you have ers charge. Most don't. Som
taken out of the bedroom and into brighter light, where a way to get in touch with each done. You remain listed until you ple want to teach or lean
it can be better viewed as a normal human activity, other. tell them you're moving or other- groups. Some wish to pursue
wise ask that a card of yours be activity that requires a grout
whether for procreation or enjoyment. Indeed, sex could THE LEARNING EXCHANGE removed. It is free. ers seeks a one-to-one siti
even be said to have redeeming social value in of itself, exists in Ann Arbor to facilitate The only expenses of the Ex- The Learning Exchange is
Subsequently, pornography should thus be accepted this contact. It is a free educational change are for 3x5 cards, the phone everyone, young, old, town,
by our society as just another outlet of our sexual appre- and interest matching service to extension, and (the big one) the Just dial 662-5189 between
ciation. No one should be force to be exposed to porno- helt people pursue their self-moti- materials for spreading the word 10 any night but Saturday.
graphy, but by the same token, no mature person who vated (versus institutionally sanc- Office space is donated by the The Exchange is ardevice 1
wishes to view the same should be restricted from doing tioned) personal growth, expand Guild House at 102 Monroe. The overcome the separation ar
their knowledge and skills, pursue E - free for sharing the know
so. an interest or hobby. The idea is ces of incorporation, thus becom- skits, and personal exciteme
THE SUPREME Court also ruled that local, rather than so simple that it's surprising this ing fertile soil for tax-deductible the people of the Ann Arbor
national, standards may be used in defining what is or hasn't been done long before. contributions. Up to now, the Ex- as a community. It is yours,
isn't pornographic. In letting a community establish sex- If you have knowledge of a skill change has been financed by sev-
hal standards however we usually find that the law- that you've picked up in the course eral small donations. The total Tom Dragosawac is a
makesanars motinlenwedusuabythe dvocatminoity o of your meanderings (and who operating expenses for the four Wri/er for The Daily.
makers are most influenced by the vocal minority of
busybody fanatics who have nothing better to do than
to moralize on the behavior of others. It shouldn't beC.
necessary for persons to have to justify their own per- O n c r ing car
congestion, etc..
sonal interests.
If an adult wishes to view material showing people
copulating with animals, each other, machines or what- By VINCENT HALE of ten of these automobiles, if you since the city seems to be thf
ever, let them. It's inone of our business, and nor should ANY WEEKDAY morning, com- take a closer look, you will see where all these problems
iter, bet th m. tn of thebuslnwsso d kco are usyd sg into any major city of but one passenger, the driver. You to a head, the place where
it be that of the law. God knows the cops are busy America you will probably notice: may also notice yellow-brown lay- majority of our populationc
enough "cracking down" on violent crimes without hav- thousands of automobiles packed ers of smog blanketing the city. gates, the city seems to1
ing to run around arresting guys for watching peep bumper to bumper on the ex- When you finally enter the city most logical of places toc
shows. pressways, and in about nine out proper, you will probably also find these problems effectively.

e, the
refund
ariety
9.
e are
or oil
amics,
ology,
Ie-
psy-
witch-
match-
vauto
epiog,
heting,
nging,
mas-
y, psy-
tennis,
reative
ng for
Its you
m con-
teach-
e peo-
rn in
esome
p. Oth-
.ation.
for
gown.
6 and
to help
ad set
wledge,
ents of
r area,
to use.
g-uest

e place
c o m e
a large
congre-
be the
combat

~tt~gt

that the streets are packed with
cars and all the good parking plac-
es are taken (unless you are will-
ing to pay dearly to park in a
lot). More than likely you have
read about the severe gasoline
shortage which is expected soon,
in which the price of gasoline may
rise to 60c, 80c or more per gallon
and which may necessitate the pol-
icy of gasoline rationing (i.e.,
only so many gallons per custom-
er per week).
All of these problems, as diverse
as they seem, are part and parcel
of one "megaproblem" - WASTE.
Waste of transportation and, con-
sequently waste of gasoline, waste
of street and parking space, waste
of the time - getting through traf-
fic, and waste exhaust fumes, foul-
ing the air and clouding the mind.
So why do we waste so much?
Is it more "convenient" to waste
than to conserve? In the short run,
perhaps; but in the long run smog,
traffic jams, no parking places,
sky-high gasoline prices and ra-
tioing aren't really all that con-
venient. But then there's the status
factor, right? Doesn't wasting
things impress others with our
opulent magnificence, our "afflu-
ent" standard of living? Perhaps,
but more likely it just makes them
want to rip us off.
THERE MUST be a workable al-
tiroative to this rather suicidal cy-
cle of "waste and then suffer the
course could be to work together,
consequences". The answer of
course could be to work together,
to conserve what we have.
How could we do this? Well,
Vincnt Hale is a ,giest writer
for The Daily.

First of all, we could place at
every major point of entrance to
the city a tollgate to operate be-
tween the hours of, say, 6 a.m.
and 12 noon on weekdays. Then for
each car with only one occupant,
we could charge a 50c "street use
tax" or "anti-pollution fee"; for
each car with two occupants, a
25c fee; for each car with three
or more occupants, no fee; for each
motorbike, no fee (a similar plan
is currently in effect on the Oak-
land-San Francisco Bay Bridge).
Then we could set up computer-
arranged car-pool operations as are
used in the Oakland-Berkley area.
You simply feed in your address,
time you must be in the city and
time you must leave, and you get
a list of people in your neighbor-
hood who would be interested in
forming a car-pool.
Or you can demand m-e effi-
cient public transportation, and
with the help of other neighborhood
residents get the city to prosnde
low-cost and convenient service to
your neighborhood.
THE REVENUE gathered by this
plan should then go directly to the
city, to provide solutions to such
problems as inadequate off-street
parking, inadequate park systems,
or whatever is needed.
If nine out of ten people totk the
bus or joined a car-pool, there
would be no gasoline shortage, few
traffic jams, plenty of parking
space, much less noise and confus-
ion, and very little smog. Also,
neighbors could get to know each
other as real people rather than
as anonymous heads in a traflic
jam. Could it be worth a try?

t

U'~ i~fl' ,ARE WE REAtZY TfC)OPRAT-F?

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan