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June 22, 1973 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-06-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Friday, June 22; 1973

THE SUMMER DAILY

Page Five

Massive strikes hit M

Chile;
SANTIAGO, Chile () - Strik-
es in favor and against the poli-
cies of President Salvador Al-
lende's leftist government left
half of Chile's 10 million people
without some vital services yes-
terday.
More than 100,000 strikers ral-
lied outside Government House in
downtown Santiago to voice their
support of the Marxist president.
THE STRIKES in support of
Allende were called by the Cen-
tral Labor Federation, dominated
by the Socialist and Communist
parties which make up part of
the government.
Those striking against the gov-
ernment were doctors, engineers,
other professional groups, some
students and agricultural work-
ers.
Four bombs exploded in San-
tiago, but no one was reported
hurt. One blast was outside a
Socialist party office, a second
outside a government office and

services cut

a third near a government tele-
vision installation. The fourth
bomb wrecked two cars outside
the home of a Cuban embassy of-
ficial.
THE ONE-DAY strikes and a
build up of tensions in Chile grew
out of a walkout by 12,000 work-
ers nearly two months ago at
El Teniente, the world's largest
copper mine, to enforce demands
for a 41 per cent pay increase.
The miners have taken an anti-
Allende stand because the gov-
ernment refuses to meet the pay
demands.
In the crowd that gathered
outside Allende's residence were
both men and women. Most wore
plastic hardhats and many car-
ried short staves and pitchforks.
Others had hastily made bamboo
lances.
Columns of about 1,000 persons
each marched in orderly fashion
from all over Santiago toward
the plaza outside La Moneda, as
the execueive mansion is called.

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THE DEMONSTRATORS
ried signs saying 'Long Live
Popular Unity government,"
"Long live the government of
people."
Some chanted "Down with
Fascists" and "To hell with
right-wingers."
Santiago city buses ran
about two hours in the e
morning so people could att
the rally, but the rest of pu
transportation stopped throt
out the country. This inclu
LAN, the national airline,
the state owned railroads.
SOME SUPERMARKETS
bakery shops opened for at
three hours, and then clo
Shopkeepers throughout the
tion kept their shutters locke
anticipation of possible violet
Telephone service, - electri
and other public utilities fi
tioned normally, but with sk
ton crews. All are governm
owned.
The Central Labor Federa
said it called its members
on otrike "to stop facism
to prevent civil wars"
THE PROFESSIONAL gro
students and agricultural wor
announced their strikes to
test what they called Allenm
attempt to make Chile a Soc
ist country.
Allende's foes protested
staying at home. Leaders of
four opposition parties called
anti-Marxists "to avoid all
vocations, and avoid any reac
to leftist attempts to provoke
orders."
New & Important
WAR and
POLITICS
available at
Bork Sa S
316 S. State St.

car-
the
and
the
the
the
for
arly
tend
Iblic
ugh-
ided
and
and
bout
sed.
na-
d in
nce.
city
'unc-
ele-
ent-
tion

out
and Law may ban fixing
tups
lers
pro-
' of foreign elections
ial-
WASHINGTON (IP) - A Senate Foreign Relations subcommittee
by proposed yesterday to make it a criminal offense for American
the citizens or government agencies to conspire to influence foreign
on elections.
pro- The legislation is aimed at preventing a recurrence of the situation
tion in 1970 when, according to testimony before the subcommittee, the
dis- International Telephone - Telegraph Corp. sought to block the election
-- of leftist Salvador Allende as president of Chile.
IN ANNOUNCING the measure at a news conoference, Sen. Frank
Church (D-Idaho), chairman of the subcommittee on multinational
corporations, said he did not know whether ITT officials had violated
any existing laws in 1970 in their efforts to protect their multi-million
dollar investments in Chile. Church said a full report on the sub-
committee's March-April hearings will be forwarded to the Justice
Department.
According to testimony at the hearings, ITT on two occasions
offered funds to the Central Intelligence Agency in 1970 to be used
in support of a conservative opponent of Allende, Jorge Alessandri. The
testimony indicated that the first plan was rejected and the second
ignored.
Later, however, the testimony disclosed that William Broe, chief of
CIA clandestine services in the Western Hemisphere, proposed to ITT
officials a plan to accelerate economic chaos in Chile. This was
designed to rally anti-Allende sentiment in the Chilean Congress, which
had yet to ratify Allende's minority victory in the popular election.
ITT, the subcommittee was told, turned down the plan as "un-
workable."
AS OUTLINED by Church, the subcommittee legislation would
make it a "criminal offense for American citizens or residents to
offer or provide funds to U.S. government agencies for the purpose of
interfering in foreign elections, or for U.S. government employes or
r agents to accept such funds."
WHAT'S A
STEAK 4

SEN. CHURCH talks about the proposed law, designed to prevent
corporations such as ITT from interfering in foreign elections.

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THE
FROM ANOTHER WORLD
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A genuinely scary science fiction thriller produced by the di-
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BIG SLEEP. Screenplay by Charles Lederer based on the story
"WHO GOES WHERE?" by Charles Campbell, Jr. Electronic
score by Dmitri Tiompkin.
"A FILM WHOSE TIME HAS COME"
-Sammy Thirdworld, COSMIC FINANCE

FRIDAY
June 22

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