100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 31, 1976 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-03-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Fage Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, March 31; 1976

PageTwoTHE ICHGAN AIL Wenesdy, arch31;19r

UM STUDENT ELECTION
" CIA/NSA Recruitment?
Should the CIA be allowed to recruit on
campus?
" New Central Student Gov't
(MSA)
At large seats on the new government being
elected.
" LSA Student Gov't
President and council seats up for election.
" PI RGIM
Board of Directors being elected.

I

Law prof attacks
capital punishment
(Continued from Page 1) surrounding the crime itself inj
ticular person shall die or not order to impose the death pen-
die,' Babin said. "If he is found alty.
guilty of first degree murder, It was Amsterdam's third ap-
then he is sentenced to death." pearance before the nation's
AMSTERDAM told the highest court in a little over
court the Louisiana law is four years to argue against cap-
typical of those in 11 states in ital punishment.
which the death penalty is im- HE WON in 1972 a five-four
posed in a supposedly manda- decision that death penalty laws
tory manner for some kinds of then on the books were uncon-
first degree murder. stitutional because they gave
He said the Texas law is rep-stuioa beuethygv
estaide T x law i ne unbridled power to judges and
resentative of laws in nine juries.
states which require a jury to
find specified circumstances J U S T I C E Potter Stew-
_ _art, who voted with the ma-

Otterbacher bids for Senate

VOTE

ca'"u" April 6,7, 8
across

KEN FELT, Itinerant Fool,
at the University
March 30th-April 3rd
sponsored by CANTERBURY HOUSE
KEN FEIT-story-teller, clown, ritual maker, musi-
cian, mime and poet will be at U of M this week to
celebrate April Foolishness. Public events during the
Fool's visit will include:
YUESDAY, MARCH 30th HELLO,
GOOD-BYE-CENTENNIAL
8:00 P.M. The Fool greets the University /
Pendleton Arts Center with a major performance. A
2nd Floor Michigan Union bittersweet celebration of the
Bicentennial, using the crafts of
the clown, story-teller, mime,
jester, and mystic.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 31st * THEOLOGY
OF THE FOOL
10:00 A.M. to 12:00 NOON Ken will discuss the religious
Kunzel Room dimensions of his vocation for
1st Floor Michigan Union local clergy, campus ministers
and o t h e r interested folks.
Open to the public.
* * A VIGIL FOR THE FEAST OF ALL FOOLS
10:00 P.M. to 12:00 The Fool invites people to join (
MIDNIGHT in creatina a solemn and frivo-\
Behind the Graduate Library lous Rite to celebrate the Eve
(aBehnd the GrodumteLsbar of April Fool's Day with move- I
(among the columns) ment/stillness, sound/silence,
stories and singing. Come Play!
THURSDAY, APRIL 1st * APRIL FOOL'S
DAY-FOLLOW THE FOOL.
10:0 OA.M. to 3:00 P.M. Ken will introduce use to thet
gather at Canterbury ancient traditions of the Fool
House and his Day.
218 N. Division at Then
It will be a Day full of sur-
Catherine prises, the unexpected. Who
knows where it will lead us?
(Perhaps out of our well-cali-
brated surprise-free universe to
gently prod the University ofJ
Michigan)
SATURDAY, APRIL 3rd * * ALL DAY
PLAYSHOP WITH KEN FEIT
10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. A reflective day with the Fool.
Canterbury House A time to uestion andlearn,
218 N. Division at not only with heads, but also
-Catherine with hands, ears, eves, hearts.
A simple meal will be provided
for lunch.
the ep ~ at .jide i ocdto
21AdetieinTettDt
Wn ArborMich an stogy -tdcphone 665-0606
It Pays to Advertise in The Dwily

(Continued from Page 1) 1
Otterbacher says he sees the!
only way to solve Michigan's
high unemployment rate is to I
provide public service jobs.
Otterbacher also says he feels
the government should key its
budget to the ebb and flow of
the economy, and while he fa-
vors deficit spending during a
recession, the senator says, "we
don't have to deficit spend any
where near the extent that we
are now."
T h e Democratic candidate
proposes tax reforms to close
what he calls "loopholes" and
says we "should use that money
to stimulate the private sector
directly tied to the creation of
jobs."
THE GRAND Rapids native
strongly favors a national health
insurance plan b e c a u s e hej
claims many middle income
families are being severely
pinched by the cost of medical
care. Such a plan would also
cover all the low income fami-
lies that do not benefit from
existing medical care programs.
Otterbacher lays the blamej
for rising food costs on the oil
industry. He says farmers are
dependent on petrochemicals
for fertilizer and fuel, and
charges that a lack of enforce-
ment of existing anti-trust laws;
is the main source of problems.

HE ADDS that inflation in
general is tied to "monopolistic
control of all the major indus-
tries in this country" and calls
for the breaking up of these,
"monopolies" in order to pro-
mote free enterprise and limit
inflation.
Otterbacher says if he is elect-
ed to the U.S. Senate he would
like to become involved in the
institution of U.S. foreign policy.
He expresses c o n c e r n about
what he calls "limits to growth"
-the people of the United States
consuming more than their fair
share of the earth's resources.
He speculates that if Ameri-
can foreign policy continues on
its present course "there is no
way in the world in 1985 we're
going to have a foreign policy
that's based on any moral foot-
ing."
"INSTEAD our foreign policy
will be based on the ability, the
understandable ability, of coun-
tries throughoutthe world to
blackmail us because of our
own gluttonous demands and
over reliance on their re-
sources," he adds.
He suggests that Americans
accept a few less luxuries and
he voices hope that politicians!
will confront their constituents
with this reality.
He also cautions the govern-
ment in giving foreign aid be-

cause "some of the right wing,
dictatorships we've supported:
are just as bad and sometimes
worse than any thing we call;
communist."
OTTERBACHER strongly sup-'
ports the proposed Equal Rights
Amendment (ERA) and fought
very hard against its repeal in
the Michigan Legislature. On
the other hand he opposes abor-1
tion because he says it is the:
taking of a human life. He be-
lieves life begins with the pres-
ence of brain waves and heart
beat. Since this occurs in a
fetus after about 18-28 days,
Otterbacher says abortion after
this length of time should be
outlawed.
He says he thinks the lack!
of day care facilities prevents
women from working and denies'
men from working and denies

them jobs. "The government
should provide child care fog
working mothers, especially low
income families," the state sen-
ator states.
The young candidate's solu-
tion to both the housing and
employment problems currently
plaguing Detroit is to pay un-
employed workers for rebuilding
and renovating the numerous
vacant homes currently owned
by the Department of Housing
and Urban Development.
He charges that education in
America has been chronically
underfunded and that "quality
education is still a myth for
many people . . . largely be-
cause it's easier to talk about
it than put up the bucks." A
quality education v should be
available to anyone who wants
it, he adds.

SUNSEED
saga of journey
to self-awareness
"the first film classic of
the new age . . .' a film
every student and teacher
should see."
East/West Journal
FEATURING .. .
Swami Satchinanda
Baba Ram Doss
Murshid Samuel L. Lewis
Rabbi Schiomo Carlebach
Swami Muktananda
Yogi Bhoian
Loma Anaqarika Govinda
Sri Bhaqavon
Maharaqi Virsa Sinqh
Pir Viloyat Inayat Khan
WED., MARCH 31
NAT. SCI. AUD.

jority in the 1972 case, asked
whether, under Amsterdam's
argument about excessive dis-
cretion, it would not follow that
any penalty would be cruel and
unusual.
"In our system of adversary
justice we have prosecutorial
discretion, we have jury discre-
tion, we have appellate review
and we have the opportunity for:
executive clemency. This is true
throughout the adversary sys-;
tem of justice. Doesn't your ar-<
gument prove too much?" Ste-
wart asked.
Amsterdam replied that "the.
death penalty is a legislative
decision in which we know not
what we do. Death in final,
death istirremediable, death is'
beyond this world."
Dr. Paul C. Uslan
OPTOMETRIST
Visual Examinations
Full Contact Lens Service
Optical Lab;
545 CHURCH, 769-1222

Leftist forces battle
in Beirut hotels

f
1

C

Calilaway resigns as
Ford campaign head

7&9

$1.50

(

COMMENCEMENT WILL BE
HELD ON MAY 1, 1976.
ALL CAP & GOWN ORDERS MUST BE
PLACED BY APRIL 2. LATE ORDERS ARE
SUAJECT TO AVAILABILiTY & $2 LATE FEE.

(Continued from Page 11
joining Ford's staff in JanuaryE
with the title of counselor to
the President, and the job of
resident politician at the White
House.
At issue in the government
inquiry is Callaway's role inI
seeking U. S. Forest Service ap-1
proval to expand a ski resort at
Crested Butte, Colo., into 2,000
additional acres of federally
owned land. The resort, like
most of its competitors in the
Rocky Mountains, is on federal;
land and pays royalties to the
government.

CALLAWAY said there was
no pressure, no conflict of in-
terest and nothing wrong.
The controversy began on
March 12 with the disclosure
that on July 3, 1975 his last day
as secretary of the Army, Calla-
way discussed the Crested
Butte expansion with two Ag-
riculture Department officials
who were long-time political
associates from Georgia.
Calloway said on March 19,
that while he applied no pres-
sure, the Agriculture Depart-j
ment officials knew what he
wanted - "approval instead of
disapproval."

(Continued from Page 1)
be accepted by countries keen
on independence, national so-
ereignity a n d non-interference
in their affairs," he declared.
Asked about prospects for a
ceasefire, he said: "We will not
agree except under certain con-
ditions."
A SEVEN-SHIP U.S. task
group from the Sixth Fleet was
moved to within 24 hours steam-
ing time of Lebanon for possible
evacuation of 7,450 American1
civilians, Pentagon sources said.
The force carries a Marine bat-
talion of about 1,700 men.
A Soviet cruiser was reported
to have moved from the Egyp-l
tian coast to a point where it I
can observe the U.S. ships. 1
There was intense house-to-
house fighting as the leftist
Moslem and Palestinian forces
advanced to within 500 yards of
the headquarters of the Pha-
lange, the right-wing party that
leads the Christian forces.
THE FALANGIST radio said
four rightwingers who had been
holding out at the Hilton Hotel

had been killed. But sources at
the hotel said the four had been
taken prisoner.
Leftists said'they had lost 50
men in the past week's fighting.
Some 500 yards west of Fa-
langist headquarters, mortar
and heavy machine gun fire
rang out.
RIGHTWINGERS were shell-
ing leftist positions near the
Hilton and black smoke billowed
from a building that had been
hit.
Sniping and shelling during
the day killed 19 persons and
wounded 24 on the various bat-
tlefronts, according to incom-
plete police tallies.
There were Arab press re-
ports that Syrian President Ha-
fez Assad had approached the
United States, France -and the
Vatican, asking if ^they could
guarantee Israel would stay out
if Syria crossed the border to
stop the fighting.
Jack Nicklaus has won the
PGA player of the year award
four times since 1967.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVI, No. 147
Wednesday, March 31, 1976
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phrone 764-0562. second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
PubishOd da ily Tuesday th'ough
Sunday morning during the univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept, thru April (2 semes-
ters): $13 ,by; mai outide. Ann
Arbor.
Summer session published. Tues-
day through Saturday moprning.
Subscription rates.. $6.0 In Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.

RENTAL RENTAL DEPOSIT

TOTAL

Bachelor
Master
Doctor

$6.50

$7.25 5.25
$7.50 5.50

2.00 $8.50
2.00 $14.50
2.00 $15.25

All Orders Must be Prepaid IN FULL When Placed.

Sun 12-5

Mon-Thur 9-9

Fri 9 -5:30 Sat 1

K

_ r

i9

lop,

We make
the styles.
I" iI
U-Mstylists
at the UNION
Now ShowingI
Todav at:
and 9 30
(R)
I lI,
"A fine film."
-Penelope Gilliatt,
The New Yorker
44I
Swept
Away.
" ;R
SHOWTIMES it
Today at1, 3, 5, 7 and 9
NOW SHOWING
unrestrained
comedy!
E1
1 ot '

HOMEWORK NOT
KEEPING YOU
BUSY ENOUGH?
It's still not too late to come down to the
Daily and help us out. The Business De-
partment NEEDS PEOPLE who want to:
" work preparing ads and learning the
operations of a daily paper
" meet other good, frustrated people
" party down once in a while
" drink 5c Cokes
" after the first month, make a LITTLE bit
of money

-CORRECTIONS-
will appear Saturday, April 3 for all
those people whose sublet ads ap-
peared incorrectly due to a Daily
error.
DEADLINE FOR ALL CALLS: FRIDAY, APRIL 2
DIAL 764-0560

I
3

W,

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan