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March 31, 1976 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-03-31

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Wednesday, March 31, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

... . ..
t

NY

race has new

NEW YORK (AP) - Because for the first time, candidates
of good timing and a new law, for convention delegates will be
Democratic voters in New York identified with the presidential
State next Tuesday will get; candidates they support.
their first chance to have a For Sen. Henry Jackson of
significant say in their party's Washington, New York offers
presidential nomination. his best shot at a convincing

The New York primary, which
for' decades was overshadowed
if not outright ignored, comes
now at a major turning point
in the race for the White House.
It is important, perhaps crucial,
to the chances of two major
contenders.
AS ALWAYS, the presidential
candidates themselves are not
on the ballot in New York. But

win in a major state. With his
appeal to old-line Democrats,
labor and the Jewish vote, Jack-
son looks on New York as a
good opportunity to demonstrate
his appeal to the New Deal
coalition on which the Demo-
crats have always depended for
national victories.

fer a make-or-break opportun
ty to test his claim to leader
ship of the progressive wing o
the party. In the judgment o
many politicians, Udall needs t
finish a strong second.
FORMER GEORGIA Go
Jimmy Carter seems to regar
New York as a "can't lose'
situation. He has not made
major effort here and has d
liberately downplayed his ow
chances. If he comes close t
or defeats Udall in putativel
liberal New York, he may elim

9
importance
i- Jackson and a convention dead- be the first time since the p
r- lock. mary began in 1912 that vote
f Deciding who is the real win- can tell from the ballot wh.
f ner in New York won't be easy presidential candidate theya
o because of the problem of count- supporting.
ing and making sense out of the T
vote. The vote-counting process The Republican primary
v. is saddled with procedural prob- exempt from this new candida
.d lemsleft over from the days designation provision, which
when the New York primary one reason the GOP prim
a was one of the oddballs of the is attracting little attention. T
e- nation's political system. other reason is that it is s
n The voters cannot vote for a being contested. Unofficial s
o es for challenger Ronald R
presidential candidate. Instead, o~n rnino inonly fn

pri-
ers
ich
are
is
ate-
is
ary
The
not
Jat-
ea-
ouir,

Interesting facts
The 1977 USGA Women's golf
championship will be played at
the Hazeltine National Golf
Club in Shaska, Minn.
Retired coach John Wooden
led UCLA to the NCAA basket-
ball crown 10 times in the past
12 seasons.
Don Bitterlich of Temple Uni-
versity led the nation's colle-
gians in field goals last season
with 21 in 31 attempts.

Yom Ha-Sho-alh
Memorial Program
A commemoration of the deaths of six
million Jews in the Nazi Holocaust.
THURSDAY, April 1st,
8:30 p.m., at H I LLEL
1429 HILL ST.

y
1-

Are

For Rep. Morris Udall of !ate the Arizoman aHIUturn
Arizona, New York and the the rest of the primary battles
same-day Wisconsin primary of- into a choice among himself,
d to

they vote for from one to six dairiets uwinreitwyt
candidates for national conven- districts; elsewhere, the voters
tion delegate. Slates of four to only choice is a regular or-
six delegates will be elected ganization slate leaning to Pres-
from each of the state's 39 con-identFord.
gressional districts. _,. ,.__

THIS THURSDAY, April 1
has been set aside as a memorial day of mocrning for
the 6,000,000 Jews, victims of the Nazi Holocaust
1933-1945.
JEWISH POPULATION FIGURES 1939-1945

CARS DISPOSED OF

w4

face Swine

By PAULINE TOOLE
In 1918 a "Killer Disease"
struck the world: Swine Influ-
enza. It swept across the sur-
face of the earth, leaving over
20 million people dead.
It may be coming back. And
we may be totally unprepared
for it.
THE DISEASE, believed to
have been caused by a mutated
form of a virus common in hogs
(hence its name), could kill an
estimated 50 million persons in
the United States alone.
Research carried out in 1955
first yielded the observation that
individuals who contracted
Swine Influenza during the 1918
epidemic were immune to the
strain. This means that most
pefsons under 50 do not possess
the antibodies necessary to com-
bat the deadly virus.
And 50 million persons in this
country are considered "high
mortality risks" if they contract
it. These include those people

over age 55 who did not con-
tract the disease in 1918 and
those with heart and respiratory
ailments, diabetes or other de-
bilatating diseases.
DR. FRED Davenport, head
of the Epidemiology Depart-
ment at the University School
of Public Health, was a member
of the original 1955 research'
team and is an expert on influ-
enza. He advocates the imme-
diate stockpiling of anti-Swine
Virus vaccine.
"These influenza viruses re-
cur in cycles," he said. "They
keep cropping up-with modifi-
cations. It is very logical and
practical to consider stockpiling
vaccine."
Davenport states that the
knowledge and skill to protect
humanity from the Swine Virus
is available. "We have the tech-
nical know-how to make the'
vaccine, too," he adds. "Even
though we haven't made a com-
mitment for civilians, the Armed
Forces will be vaccinated."

THE TIME is short, however.
"If the virus is being seeded
now," says Davenport, "influ-
enza will develop in the fall of
1976. It makes sense to stock-
pile vaccine now. We have to
take this matter seriously."
The major obstacle to produc-
tion and storage of adequate
amounts of the vaccine seems to
be the problem of money. The
government would have to al-
locate funds, and it would cost
approximately $100 million to
carry out the stockpiling.
And of course, even though
the vaccine could be stored for
las long as 5 years, there is no:i
way of predicting with 100 per
cent accuracy that the Swine
Virus will strike next fall.
Davenport sums up the prob-
lem in this way: "If we stock-
pile vaccine and the flu doesn't
strike, we lose money. If we
don't stockpile vaccine and the'
flu strikes we lose lives. It's
that simple."

SOME 206 OF THE state's CHARLOTTETOWN (AP) -
delegates to the Democratic con-
vention will be selected this way AI"derelicts to dollars"dcam-
next Tuesday. The other 68 will paign is helping Prince Edward
be at-large delegates apportion- andes
ed by the state Democratic Th oices $20 for
Committee on the basis of the Te province pays $20 or
number of delegates won by: each car body delivered to dis-
each presidential contender. posal sites for crushing.
Under a law enacted at the
last minute this year, delegate- The Arkansas Derby at Oak-
candidates can be identified on lawn Park is scheduled for
the ballot with any candidate April 5, one month before the
they are pledged to. This will Kentucky Derby.
BILLS STILL TO RISE:

-Ei
(
t
,
i
a

COUNTRY JEW
POLAND
U.S.S.R.
RUMANIA
HUNGARY
CZECHOSLOVAKIA
FRANCE
GERMANY
LITHUANIA
HOLLAND
LATVIA
BELGIUM
GREECE
YUGOSLAVIA
AUSTRIA
ITALY
BULGARIA
OTHERS

'ISH POPULATION-1939
3,200,000
2,100,000
850,000
404,000
315,000
300,000
210,000
150,000
150,000
95,000
90,000
75,000
75,000
60,000
57,000
50,000
20,000

JEWS KILLED
2,800,000
1,500,000
425,000
200,000
260,000
90,000
170,000
135,000
90,000
85,000
40,000
60,000
55,000
40,000
15,000
7,000
6,000

% KILLED
85%
71.4%
50%
49.5%
82.5%
30%
81%
90%
60%
89.5%
44.4%
80%
73.3%
66.6%
26.3%
14%
30%

rateI
LANSING (UPI) - In a de-I
cision extending far beyond
simple rate-making, the Michi-<
gan Public Service Commission t
has trimmed Detroit Edison'sI
request for a $178 million elec-
tric rate hike to $62.4 million. c
The action, approved on a 2-1 e
vote yesterday with Commis-I
sioner William Ralls dissenting,
will boost the average monthly
rate of Edison's residential cus-
tomers by 76 cents.
IN A blistering statement,
Edison said it 'would fight the
decision in the courts.
Hailed as an 'innovative and
creative" decision by PSC Chair-'
man Daniel Demlow, it will
also make customers who use
more electricity pay more in
an unprecedented "inverted rate'
structure."
Under other major provisions,

,rims
~zike
Edison will be allowed to pass
along only 90 per cent of its fuel
cost increases to customers, and
then only after monthly PSC
hearings.
THE COMMISSION also or-
dered an in-depth review of the
efficiency of Detroit Edison
management.
"We believe that the commis-
sion's action today is irrespon-
sible, grossly unfair and con-
trary to law, and that it can
cause =great harm to the people
of Michigan," said Edison
Chairman William Meese.
COLOR
! PHOTOGRAPHY
1 Munson and Munson
CALL 995-3929
Hours: 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.

TOTAL:

8,301,000

5,978,000

72%

DAIY AOFFICIAL BULLETIN

Wednesday, March 31
DAY CALENDAR
WUOM: National Town Meeting,
Panel discussion, "Education Today
- How. Relevant?," Panelists Rep.
Albert QuIe (R-Minn.), Rep. John
Brademas (D-Ind.), John Ryor, Pres.
NEA, moderator Grace Hechinger,
author Growing Up in America,
10:30 a.m.
Afro - American/African Studies:
Bamidele Agbasegbe, "The Structure
of Agricultural Black Families Eth-
nographic' Perspectives from South
Carolina, 'Haiti, and Yorubaland,"
1017 Angell, noon
Ctr. Russian/E. European Studies:
Brian Silver, Mich. State U, "Some
Political 'Correlates of Linguistric
Russification in the Soviet Union;"
Commons Rm., Lane Hall, noon.
ILIR: Robert Grosse, "Making Use
of Evaluation Results in Policy
Formulation," W. Conf. Rm., Rack-
ham, 3 p m.

I S M R R D: Mark Hildebrandt,
"Mental Retardation and Child
Abuse," 130 S. First, 3 p.m.
Int'l. Ctr.: Travel Tip programs,
"Itinerary Planning," 630 E. Madi-
son, 3 p.m.
wm w. Cook, American Institu-
tions: Richard E. Neustadt, (Presi-
dential Power Revisited: Reflections
on Johnson and Nixon), "Personali-
ties and Situations," 100 Hutchins
Hail, 3:15 p.m.
Biological Sciences: Igor Dawid,
Carnegie Institution, "Organization
,of Animal Ribosomal DNA," Lec.
Rm. 1, MLB, 4 p.m.
' U Players: Herbert III, Arena
Theatre, 4:10 p.m
Art: Martin Hurtig, "Art and Poli-
tics, Chicago Style," Aud., Art,
Arch., N. Campus, 4:30 p.m.
Residential College: Gardner Ack-
ley, "The Current Economic Situa-
tion," Greene Lounge, E. Quad, 7
p m.
Friends, Sufi Order: Sunseed:

Journey to Self Awareness, Nat. Sci,
Aud., 7-9 p.m.
Music School: Student showing,
"Carmen," Mendelssohn. 7:30 p.m.;
Trio Concert: Jerome Jelinek, vio-
loncello, Joseph Gurt, piano, Charles
Avsharian, violin, Rackham Aud., 8
p m.; Degree Recital; Cynthia Mil-
ler, clarinet, Aecital Hall, 8 p.m.
Musical Society: Pennsylvania Bal-
let, Power Ctr., 8 p.m.
GENERAL NOTICES
Near Eastern Studies & Program
in Judiac Studies: 1975-76 Zwerdling
Lectures, Dr. Nahum M. Sarna,
Brandeis U, "The Superscriptions
to the Pasalms and the Activities
of the Musical Guilds," Mon., April
5, Lecture Rm 1 MLB, 4:10 p.m.
"Talmudic Statements on the Order
of Biblical Books in Light of Meso-
potamian and Alexandrian Library
Science," Tues., April 6, Aud. B,
Angel Hall, 4:10 p.m.

I

I

1

??WORRIED ABOUT PASSOVER??!
Consider Having Your Seder at CHABAD HOUSE
In a Warm, Joyous Chassidik Atmosphere and also consider our
Kosher food service during the entire holiday.
RESERVATIONS NOW BEING TAKEN

FOR THE PUBLIC INTEREST . * *
ELECTIONS FOR
PIRGIM'S BOARD OF
DIRECTORS WILL BE
HELD APRIL 6,7,and8
Any student is eligible to run for one of nine
positions on the Board. To become a candidate,
sign up at the PIRGIM office (4116 Michigan
Union) no later than Thursday, April 1.
For further information CALL 662-6597
Public Interest Research Group in Michigan

For Information Call
995-3276 (99-LEARN)

or Write To:

_.
I -_____- -____

U

CHABAD HOUSE
715 Hill St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48104

Donation
$5.00
rer Seder

I

OwmCY

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN-FLINT
Over 100 courses will be offered at the UM-Flint during the 1976 Summer
Program. Students can earn 2 credits in a short, ten-day Minisession or up
to 9 credits during a Summer Session. Prospective students are encouraged
to seek admission early.
Minisession A: May 5.- May 18
Minisession B: May 20 - June 3
Registration: May 3
Earn 2 credits in ten days

Sul

AM

MOM

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HAPPY HOUR

Michigan Residents
$28/credit hour

Non-Michigan Residents
$89/credit hour

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HALF-PRICE
on
DRINKS
7-9:30
15c HOT DOGS every Friday from 2-5
p.m., while they last.
$100 PFF
ANY PIZZAJ

i.

Summer Session 1:
Summer Session 1I:

May 3 - June 19
Registration: May 3
June 21 - August 7
Registration: June 18

Earn up to 9 credits in 7 weeks

Michigan Residents
$28 per credit hour
$153 (5 credit hours or more)

Non-Michigan Residents
$89 per credit hour
$485 (5 credit hours or more)

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