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December 12, 1975 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-12-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Paae4 Eiaht

T14P AAI('Wff--APf' fluff V

~ "-r ntL I'U AFN LJLFriday, Decembe
GEO files complaint' SHRP elects Ward Safety of DNA research questioned
With HEW agai4nst' 2 2councilcandtntined from Page 1) create a fait accompi. They raised Pote tare much more Al in Zander, wa
a tgS2cds NIHr I hu Werhope develop things so far that cosbinas of kthe implications of wit looking int
there wilib peer pressure" to there's nothing to do bt ac rcombnnt DNA work Bit i pe implications

r 12, 19/D,
as charged
s the long-
of bio-haz-

(Continued from Page 1)
ing to GEO, is its lack of pro-
vision for graduate student re-
cruitment. At present, the pro-
gram covers the hiring of al-
ready admitted graduate stu-
dents as teaching assistants.
GEO contends that the program
must cover the recruitment of
sthud e n t s into the graduate
schools.
The University contends that
it is presently going beyond
what the government requires
in the area of graduate student
affirmative action. John For-
syth, GEO contract administra-
tor, said that the present pro-
gram "far exceeds relevant
HEW guidelines." He chided the
GEO for its "bad faith" in con-
tinuing the campaign to include
recruitment in the University's
program.
GEO has frequently asserted
that because its admisison is a
"condition of employment," rel-
evant HEW guidelines requires
some provision for recruitment.
Two HEW officials contacted
yesterday denied this claim.
They said that admission poli-
cies have never been considered
within the scope of HEW af-
firmative action guidelines re-
lating to graduate student em-
ployment.
ALTHOUGH they would not
comment in detail on the pend-
CHARING CROSS
BOOKSHOP
Used, Fine and Scholarly Books
316 S. STATE-994-4041
Open Mon.-Fri. 1 -9,
Sat. 10-6
BILLIARDS
BOWLING
and
PINBALL
OPEN REGULAR HOURS
during study and exams
at the UNION

ing complaint, their opinion was The Socialist Human Rights
that the GEO allegations con- Party (SHRP) at a meeting
cerning recriutment were with- last night picked Diane Kohn
out basis. as its candidate for the Sec-
The GEG complaint is the ond Ward City Council seat in
latest in a series of attempts by next April's election.
the union to include recruitment The meeting, held in the SH-
in the University's affirmative RP headquarters on William
action p r o g r a m. The union St attracted only nine party
maintains that its contract with
the University requires this. An members.
unbiasedsreading of the con- NO DECISION was made on
tract does not suggest this in- NODCSNwamdeo
terpretation, at least not so who, if anyone, will run in the
clearly as the union implies. other wards. Party members
GEO filed a grievance with do not forsee victories in the
the University over this matter April election. However, they
which came to an abrupt end view the campaign as an oppor-
when an arbitrator ruled it was tiinity to "reach the commun-
out of his jurisdiction. He sug- ity in an educational way."
gested GEO try the courts. "I would be very happy if I
won," Kohn said, "but it would
The Soil Conservation and take a major miracle."
Domestic Allotment Act grants Phil Carol, an SHRP mem-
payments to farmers who let ber and former candidate for
their land lie fallow or plant' congress and council, said,
cover crops. It was enacted "Our vote total will probably
March 2, 1936. be lower than it ever was. But,

1
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Bizarre and Unusual Plants
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we'll be visible."
The April SIIRP campaign is
Mlanned to be directed at the
theme of "buycentennial, im-
perialism and unemployment,"
though Kohn is considering
bringing out some local issues.
"It's easier for a person to
identifyhwithtissues if they
know how the issues affect
them," she said.
During the campaign Kohn
said she will attempt "to talk
to people about socialism so
that they aren't afraid of it,
and convince them that a rev-
olution by socialists is the only
'hope( for reforming govern-
ment)."
The first aircraft to land it
the Yukon were three IDeHa~il-
lands in 1920.
t 4 -
QUR GIt(
18 ~ i39
HEAR TTO TOSSED
,TN
In
3035 Washtenaw
across from Lee Oldsmobile

*.wrpl wit hIthe NLrules.
ProfessorhHenrik Skolomowski
of the Humanities Department
feels additional supervisory con-
rrols are needed to make sure
reco-n inant D N A research's
vast potential for genetic ma-
iipilation is put to ethically de-
fe sible uses.
REFERRING to the scientific
rom.muoity as "the high priests
of secular society." Skolomow-
ki asserts, "Scientists want
freedom of inquiry. But the im-
7)liations here are so potential-.
lv threatening, that we can't let
them have it until we're abso-
iNtalv sere of the outcome.
"Scientists and engineers

_ _ _
,.

cept it. We have to find an ef-
fective means by which scien-
tists will be accountable in real
terms to societv."
The University's foremost re-
searchers in the recombinant
DNA field are assistant nrofes-
sor of microbiology David Jack-
son and molecular biologist Ro-
bert Helling.
JACKSON claims to share
Skolomowski's concern over the
eventual application of his
work, but he shuns the pros-
.pect of extra-scientific and pos-
sibly unreasonable constraints
on its progress.
He says that since the ethical
and safety issues were first

as soon as von stnrt abridging
the right of free scientific in-
q'iirv, yo concentrate the au-
thority on fewer people and
yon have to rely on the infalli-
bility of fewer neonle."
Vice-President for Research
Oerberger says he recognized
the sensitive nature of the work
when the moratorium on re-
search was announced last
ve r. Last simmer, at Over-
berger's direction, three com-
mittees were set up to deal
with various asnects of the re-
combinant DNA issue.
N E I D II A R D T recalls
thnt Committee B, under re-
search associate vice-president

erdo'is research and advising
(Overberger) as to what kind
of mechanism should be set
an to monitor it."
When the Regents approved
the aznnlication for laboratory
re, ion last week, they did
so without benefit of any re-
nort. or concl'isions from the
ethics committee.
AS ZXNDER sees it the re-
search gro'p was justified in
nresenting the me-sure, and the
regp"ts in npnroving it. before
Committee B completed its
work- "Tn the first place, re-
^Mh of t1'at kind is going on
anyway. T1'e researchers are
vo"ig, hardworking people.

"DANCE IS AN ACT OF LOVE" . . . Maurice Beiart
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY EVENINGS 8:30 P.M.---SATURDAY MATINEE 2:00 P.M.
TICKETS AT HUDSON'S, GRINNELL'S, MUSIC HALL, OR ORDER BY PHONE: 963-7680
STUDENT DISCOUNT WITH I.D. FOR GROUP DISCOUNTS, CALL- 973-7622
MUSIC HALL CENTER-350 Madison Ave.-Detroit (Madison & Brush)

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In our culture, healing of mind, body, spirit and community are most
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forms on which seemingly diverse kinds of healing are based?
Friday, December 12, 1975
8 p.m.
"Psychological, Physical, Spiritual
and Political Healing"
WILLIAM SNECK
U. of M. psychologist and Jesuit priest
8:00 HERB TEA, 8:30 DISCUSSION
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Joyce and Dick prepare vegetables to go in the Spaghetti Sauce, part of a weekly
special at Indian Summer.
And now for something completely different. Treat yourself to a meal that is not
only delicious-but good for you, too! At Indian Summer restaurant, conveniently lo-
cated at 315 S. State St., you can combine the best of both worlds.
Indian Summer opened its doors in 1971, when the community first began to care
about what it was eating. And since that time Indian Summer has attempted-and suc-
ceeded-to bring the Ann Arbor community high quality, tasty food at down-to-earth
prices.
Careful, individual preparation, and high-quality ingredients are the rule at
Indian Summer, not the exception. The kitchen doesn't own a can opener-everything
is used fresh. Indian Summer also bakes all of its own breads-so they're always
served with that great first-day taste.
The dedication to freshness goes so far that, with a few exceptions, Indian
Summer won't serve any leftovers. They'd rather throw out food at the end of the day
than serve you something that's sat overnight.
Maybe thats why the casual, intimate eatery has earned such a loyal, large
following in the community.
Indian Summer is also proud of its role in expanding Ann Arbor's culinary and
cultural horizons. Miso Soup, a traditional Japanese broth made of soybeans, rice,
barley and seaweed, made its Ann Arbor debut in Indian Summer. So did tempura, a
dish featuring fruit and vegetable pieces dipped in batter, then deep-fried in safflower
oil. Delicious.
For the first-time visitor to Indian Summer, just deciding what to choose is a
tough decision. The appealing sandwiches compete with the attractive daily specials
to make menu selection tough. The sandwich combination of cream cheese, apple
butter and nuts can't be beaten. Buit there are those who swear by the avacado, cream
cheese and tomato. Visit often and decide the controversy for yourself.
At dinner time there's an easy solution to the diner's dilemma; stick to the
daily specials and you can't be disappointed. Tuesday is spaghetti night, and it's worth
a trip just for the garlic bread that accompanies each order. Thursday features cheese
fondue-melted gruyere flavored with wine to dip bread and vegetable pieces in.

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