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October 10, 1975 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-10-10

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rage Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Mystic broadcasts' silence

Friday, October 10, 1975
SGC hits PIRGIM funding

A carserinlaw-
without law school.
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Now there. is a way to bridge the gap between an
undergraduate education and a challenging, respon-
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Since 1970, The Institute for Paralegal Training
has placed more than 950 graduates in law firms,
banks, and corporations in over 80 cities.
If you are a student of high academic standing
and are interested in a career as a Lawyer's Assis-
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Contact your placement office for an interview with
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(Continued from Page1)
AFTER everyone has com-'
mented on their experience,J
Tyagi says a few words about'
the difference between mind
and thoughtless consciousness.1
Then his companion, Sue Bliss,
reads a passage from a book
about the "life force," kunda-'
lini. With that, the session ends.
Tyagi's mystical career be-
gan about 20 years ago when,
at the age of 18, he discovered
that he was apparently able to
put people into a relaxing
trance, or a "state of thought-
less consciousness." This talent
of Tyagi's was gradually noticed
by others, but he always shied,
away from exploiting it in any
way.
Last year, a friend of Tyagi's
in Detroit invited the mystic to
America because he was inter-
ested in the trance phenomenon.

Word of Tyagi's ability spread
quickly, and before long he was
forced to move from his rela-
tive's home. The neighborhood
had become crowded with cars
belonging to people attending
trance sessions, drawing com-
plaints.
TYAGI moved to S mthgate,'
where he currently lives. Even-
tually demand became sa great
for him, the story goes, that he
began to set up regular sessions
around the state.
Now he has a busy, American-
style schedule: Mondays in Ann
Arbor, Tuesdays in Lansing,
Wednesdays and Thursdays in
Kalamazoo, and the weeeknd at
home, where he accepts visits
from those who are interested.
The people participating in the
cosmic transmissions seemed
eager to comment on their rea-
sons attending the sessions.
One woman remarked, "I
come here to experience the
silencing of my mind."
FOR ONE student, the traice
sessions had acquired value over
a period of time. "qt first, I'
came here just for myself," he
said. "Now, it's somehow mere
than me."
Doug Shapiro of Ann Arbor
has known Tyagi for about a
year. Previously involved with
the Divine Light movement, he
now goes to Ann Arbor sessions
weekly, when not working at in-
dian Summer or selling fruit on
the Diag.
Shapiro emphasizes tlis 1lii-

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mility of the "transmitter":
"He has no more ego. He has
just enough ego to keep him in'
the here and now, just enough
to maintain his physical body."
The characteristics of his pro-
gram differ considerably from
those of the two well-known
Westernized Indian spirituality
movements.
Unlike Sat Guru Mahara Ji's
Divine Light mission, there are
no devotional commitments re-
quested or demands for relin-
quishing of material possessions.
In contrast to Mahareshi Ma-
hesh Yogi's highly promoted
Transcendental M e d i t a t i o n,
there is no initiation fee or spe-
cial technique.
TYAGI'S companion, B 1 i s s,
felt compelled to stress the fact
that there was no profit motive.
"There have been people who've
tried to capitalize on this, ' she
said, "and he's moved away
from that. He's really not into
charging admission."
"I hate the title 'Guru',"!
Tyagi says. The title means
"teacher," and he does not
claim to be a teacher, but rather
a "cosmic transmitter"-not1iingj
more, nor less.
He commented, "Sometimes
there are people, like Buddha
or Christ, who are endowed with
a connection to the cosmic
source of energy. I disc.,vered
I had this gift."
Is he comparing himself to the
Budha or to Christ? "I make no
such claims," he said, grinning.
Dr. Paul C. Uslan
OPTOMETRIST
Full Contact Lens Service
Visual Examinations
548 CHURCH ST.
663-2476

By GLEN ALLERHAND
Student Government Council
(SGC) took action last night to
change PIRGIM's fee assess-
ment policy, which has recently
come under attack by students.
Council passed a resolution
that would suggest to the Re-
gents that "they see to it that
a more equitable funding sys-
tem" be developed.
PIRGIM has drawn fire from
some students because it now
automatically charges everyone
$1.50 per semester. In past
years, only those students wish-
ing to give their money were
assessed.
Though provisions were made
for people to receive refands
if they do not want to pay the
fee, PIRGIM members recog-
nize the complaints their policy
has drawn.
SPEAKING at last night's
meeting, PIRGIM Board of Di-
rector member Eric Fersht ccm-
mented, "We don't want to be
attacked. We want an equitable
funding system."

Fersht suggested that an ad I billing process.
hoc committee be established to
investigate other funding pro- ASKED why he filed suit, he
cedures more acceptable to the responded, "I do not ike people
student body. taking my money."
In response to Fersht spoke Brandenburg denied naving a
Patricia Romcick a n d Rich personal v e n d e t t a against
Scheidt, who have worked on PIRGIM: "I'm not against them
petition drives to generate sup- in principle, but I'm not for
port for a new assessment them in principle-either."
policy. In other Council action, mem-
SCHEIDT said, "This unrea- bers voted in an elections direc-
sonable system provides an un- tor, local resident Tim Kunin.
equal opportunity to deci.le to In his new post, Kunin will re-
s u p p o r t or n o t support ceive an approximate 5201) flat
PIRGIM." rate and a salary based on the
Alan Barak, a University law number of hours worked.
student who is also a member Also, Council delayed motion
of PIRGIM, replied, "The rec- on joining the National Student
ommendation will be made to L o b b y, a Washington - based
the Regents. We'll certainly group working in support of
make the proposal. We don't programs for higher education.
want to run the investigation President D e b r a Goodman
bureaucratically." cited two reasons for postponing
In a further blow to PIRGIM, action: Council does not yet
law student Robert Brandenburg know if it has the money fur a
brought suit against the organi- nembership fee, and other stu-
zation, contending that it has dent groups should be con-
"violated the rights of the stu- sidered.
dens of this university" with itsI

Ford threatens veto

4 .

Everyone likes to keep snapshots.
We'll snap the ones you can't.

(Continued from Page!I)
FORD SAID he has seen noth-
ing so far that would lead him
to give any answer but "no"
to requests for aid for New York
City, which faces the threat of
defaulting on its bonds.
He said he has heard of no
congressional relief plans that
would justify his approval, has
found no substantial sentiment
for any legislation to bail out the
city.
"I do not think it's a healthy
thing for the federal government
to bail out a city, and I mean
any city, that has handled its
fiscal affairs as irresponsibly
over a long period of time as
New York City," Ford said.

9
-w (ISA
Y s 2
l i

1/iC

I
It
f
ll
's f
iEj

MIC IGANENSI AN
U-M's Year in Review
SENIOR PORTRAIT SITTINGS THRU OCT. 10
To make appointment, visit Diag, 10-3,
phone 764-0561, 6-8 p.m., or
stop by 420 Maynard

Professional Theatre Program
Guest ArtistSeries
ARTHUR MILER'S
OENTO OF A ,
OCTOBER 8-12
itePower Center BxO pneeig f
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WHERE DO YOU GO AROUND
HERE TO MEET SOME NEAT
PEOPLE?
HAVE YOU BE EN
OVER 7TO (!

ON HIS disclosure of the can-
cellation of his Louisville trip,
Ford for the first time acknowl-
edged that such a visit was be-
ing called off because of se-
curity. Precautions for the Pres-
ident's protection havebeen'
tightened since his two Septem-
ber encounters with gun-wield-
ing women, in Sacramento and
San Francisco.
In another matter, Ford in-
dicated an announcement of a
U.S.-Soviet agreement on the
sale of AMerican grain to Rus-
sia will be made shortly.
He said a grain estimate
would be released today by the
Agriculture Department and "as
soon as we get that report I
presume thereswill be some an-
nouncement as to the further
sale" of grain to the Soviet
Union.
FORD imposed a moratorium
on grain sales overseas last
spring pending an agreement on
a long-term Russian purchase.
VETERAN
MAKE YOUR WEEKEND PAY
Michigan National Guard
483-3184!
I - -
INTERNATIONAL
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WEEKLY.
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BEGINS TODAY
FRIDAY, OCT. 10
3:00 to 4:30
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Study. Drink and Visit
ALL WELCOME

University
refutes
allegations
(Continued from Page1)
But Richard English, asso-
ciate vice-president for aca-
demic affairs, joined Forsyth in
denying a breach of good faith
by the University.
"For one," English remarked
last night, "the affirmative ac-
tion part of the contract was
negotiated in early spring and
an unrealistic deadline was
set. The affirmative Action of-
fice had a staff member work-
ing on the proposal full - time
all through the summer and we
had a paper ready by' the Sept.
1However," English added,
"the GSAs for the fall term had
already been appointed way be-
fore Sept. 1, and the proposal
would have had no effect on
those appointments anyway."
English indicated that an af-
firmative action program would
take effect in the next hiring
period starting Nov. 1.
IDaily Off icial Bulletin
Friday, October 10
Day Calendar
wUOM: George Woodcock, Cana-
dian author, "Towards Compassion
& Detachment: The Philosophers
of Pessimism & Our Time,'"10:o5
am.
Educ. Communications Media:
Larry, Schorling Aud., SEB,. noon.
Guild House: Luncheon, Roder-
ick Gilkey, "Psycho therapy and
Religion," 802 Monroe, noon.
" Field Studies Program: George
Lakey, "Non - Violent Struggle:
Facts and Fallacies or Whose Tea
Party This Time: Ahticipating the
2nd American Revolution," Greene
Lounge, 1 pm.
Kelsey Museum of Arxhaeology;
History of Art: Katherine Dunabin,
McMaster U., "Mosaics of Roman
North Africa," 203 Tappan, 4 pm.
PTP: Guest Artist Series, Miller's
Death of a Salesman, Power, 8 pm.
Music School: New York Brass
Quintet, Robert Nagel, director,
Recital Hall, 8 pm.
This
Weekend
FRI.-SAT.
ROSALIE
SORRELS

_---'

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FRIDAY, OCT. 10

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