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October 10, 1975 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1975-10-10

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Friday, October 10, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Poge Three

S a
pain
clamps
down on
guerillas
MADRID, Spain (Reuter) -
Spain's cabinet, faced with the
death of still another policeman
shot in the latest wave of politi-
cal violence, yesterday consid-
ered ways of stepping up its
anti-guerrilla campaign.
The death Wednesday night of
policeman Miguel Castillo, 31,
who was wounded in a guerril-
la attack here October 1,
brought to 10 the number of po-
lice officers who have died since
the September 27 execution of
five urban guerrillas, convicted
of murdering policemen.
THE MEETING of govern-
ment ministers today at the of-
fice of Prime Minister Carlos
Arias Navarro washeld to pre-
pare for a cabinet session today
to be chaired by head of state
Francisco Franco, 82.
One suggestion raised before
the cabinet early this week, in-
formed sources said, was to use
army troops in the anti-guerrilla
campaign, particularly in the
Basque countryside of the north
where the separatist organiza-
tion ETA hides out.
But the sources said most re-
gional military commanders op-
posed the plan, arguing that po-
lice and the paramilitary civil
*guards were sufficient to deal
with terrorism.
DESPITE the army's reluc-
tance to be drawn into the anti-
guerrilla campaign, several mil-
itary units already are intensi-
fying training in anti-guerrilla
warfare.
The southern military com-
mand said its forces recently
had staged anti-guerrilla ma-
neuvers in rolling countryside
around Cordoba.
Government sources said the
prime minister was determined
to check violent ultra-right-wing
reaction that would expose Spain
to further foreign criticism.
But there was fear in the
Spanish press that stricter cen-
sorship would be imposed. The
Roman Catholic daily Ya said
in an editorial that such a step
would be self-defeating in the
campaign against terrorism be-
causedthedpublic would be in-
formed badly.
Several left-wing priests, poli-
ticians and journalists have re-
ported receiving death threats.
One Spanish newsman who
writes for French and Brazilian
newspapers asked for police pro-
tection after finding slogans
daubed on his house saying
"Red" and "You Have Had
Your Final Warning."
The term "lulu" is a short
form of the phrase "payment
in lieu of expenses" and was
originated by New York Gov.
Alfred Smith in the 1920s.

60-80 INJURED:

Leftist soldiers hold
Portuguese garrison

OPORTO, Portugal 1P) - Mu- I
tinou3 far-left soldiers voted yes- I
terday to continue to hold out
at their garrison here and pre-f
pared for a long siege. TheirI
civilian supporters - after ac
night of mob fighting with op-i
ponents - erected a wood and
metal barrier outside the bar-
racks.
"We decided almost unani-
mously to hold this fort until
our comrades are reinstated,"
a second lieutenant with the,
Serra do Pilar artillery regi-
ment told a reporter.
HE WAS referring to left-ori-
dn-r e Ifpr i rra rn o

we can do it all over the coun-
try."
THE REBELS, about 700 in
number, say they are receiving
food and supplies and have re-
ceived expressions of support
from other units.
The government in Lisbon has
said it will take no violent ac-
tion to clear the barracks but
was reported to be deeply di-
vided between those who feel
the uprising will wind down and
a group pressing for it to be
crushed.
"There's not much chance of
a confrontation," a sergeant

the regiment that m o v e d
through the crowd.
Soldiers, quoted by Commun-
ist oriented newspapers, claimed
the centrists did the shooting but
there was no independent con-
firmation. The northern military
command accused the leftists
outside the garrison of starting'
the violence and doing the fir-
ing.
As a precaution against at-
tack, the rebel unit's civilian
supporters erected a barricade
of wood and sheet metal yester-
day at the base of a ramp lead-
ing to the barracks.'

West Side Book Shop
Fine Used, Rare and Out-of-Print
Books Bought and Sold
o MODERN FIRSTS
- AMERICAN INDIANS
* POETRY
* MUSIC
s AMERICANA
" OCCULT
113 W. Liberty-995-1891
MON.-SAT.: 11:00 A.M. TO 6:00 P.M.
THURS., FRI. NITES TILL 9:00 P.M.
IMOEari Chcassidic fEstival
Isra~el's most popula~r
B stQe production
Is coming to
e POWER CENTER FOR
PERFORMING ARTS
MONDAY, OCT. 20, 1975
8:00 P.M.
sponsored by B'NAI BRITH
HILLEL FOUNDATION
0t U-M
4 4 TICKETS
Students-$3.00
Non-students--$5.00
'TlPflilD ilLYU

ARMED BUENOS AIRES poli
the U.N. High Commission I
American refugees protesting
seized 14 hostages Wednesday
another country.
Chileans.4
staff, see1k
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina
(Reuter) - Armed refugees
holding five U.N. officials hos-
tage in an office building said
yesterday an organization which
helps place refugees in Europe
had promised to pay for their
airline tickets out of the coun-
try.
The 10 refugees, nine Chileans
and one Brazilian who came to
Argentina in 1973 after the over-
throw of the left-wing Chilean
government of President Salva-
dor Allende, have demanded
asylum in a European country.
A SPOKESWOMAN for the
refugees told Reuter the offer
for air tickets had come from
the Intergovernmental Commit-
tee for European Migration
(ICEM).
There was no immediate re-
action from Argentine authori-
ties on the offer.
The refugees seized 14 hos-'
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVI, No. 32
Friday, October 10, 1975
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
Published d a il y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
ters); $13 by mail outside Ann Ar-
bor.
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.

entea sol ers purged irom a said. "The people and other sol-
drivers training center in the ,
Oporto areab rg Gen. An1- dirs would uiebhn s
tonio ires Veloso as Portugal's TE fht wt ocks and
new, more moderate govern- clubs at the gates of the regi-I
ment sought to remove the Cor- ment late Wednesday and earlyI
u traces of the previous
govenmet, esterday left 60 to 80 demon-
The strators injured, four in serious
........s, derdtercondition with gunshot wounds,
mutiny Tuesday, are also de- according to hospital officials.
AP Photo manding the resignation of leftist civilian supporters of the
ice stand outside the offices of Pires Veloso. soldiers and centrists who con-
for Refugees where 10 South "Everybody said the northern sder the rebellonta major threat
living conditions in Argentina regions was' so conservative, to Portugal's sixth provisional
and demanded safe passage to would be loyal to the fascist government and a possible spark
purges that have recently been for civil war - was fought be-
carried out," the lieutenant said. hind makeshift wooden shields.
"But if we -can pull it off here, It was broken up by a tank from
* ~ T eT I __
asylum !(
tages Wednesday when they oc- Va--- -
cupied the offices here of the
Refugees (UNHCR). Nine of the Li
hostages, eight women and a/
man who suffered an epileptic IMPORTS AND CRAFTS FROM THE AMERICASO
fit, were freed later. 309 E.,LIBERTY
THE DIRECTOR of the9EER
UNHCR's legal division, John (BELOW POTS 'N PLANTS)
Kelly, arrived from Geneva yes-
terday for talks with the refu- Specializing in MEXICAN TILES and POT- U1
gees and government officials. TERY, ORIGINAL, TRADITIONAL and CON- c
An ICEM spokesman here TEMPORARY ART, and many other HAND-
confirmed the committee was o1 MADE ITEMS, including clothing and blankets.
prepared to buy the tickets forv
the refugees, who have saida
they wanted to go to Belgium, -
Sweden or Denmark. But he
said the refugees first had to be
accepted by some European
country.
In Geneva, an UNHCR spokes-I
man said U.N. officials had con-
tacted five governments about
entry visas for the refugees. He
said one country had rejected
the refugees outright, but did UACCONGERTCO OP
not identify the country.
"It has not given any reason
and wedhave not asked forone,";' TICKETS GO ON SALE
he said. The spokesman added' O1 iLL
that the refugees had said they M YAOCT. 14 for
wanted permission for a total AhY, 1 4
of 17 people to leave Argentina.
This would include their fami-
lies.
U- --

FUTURE SPACES: INNER
& OUTER
* Carl Sagan - "Explora-
tion of Space"
Stanley Krippner -"Do
Changes in Conscious-
ness Lead to Changes in
Society?"
Robert Theobald-"New
Dialog for a New Fu-
ure"
0 J. Allen Hynek - "The
UFO Experience"
* Richard Farson - "The
Future of the American
Family"
* Stephanie Mills, Moder-
ator (concerned w i t h
overpopulation)
-Two-day p a n e 1 discus-
sion, with rap sessions, two
feature films and other ac-
tivities designed to explore
the question of where we
have been and where we
are going. Future shock is
today. Nov. 1 & 2, all day,
C o n r a d Hilton, Chicago.
$55.
STUDENT FEE: $35 with
this coupon-Oasis Center,
12 E. Grand, Chicago 60611,
(312) 266-0033.

Tickets are available at the office
of the Hillel Foundation, 1429 Hill
St., Ann Arbor.
This group and performance has no con-
nection - with or resemblance to any per-
formance that appeared last year in Ann
Arbor.

I

Subscribe to The Daily-Phone 764-0558

UNUSUAL IMPORTED
and DOMESTIC
Shoes, Boots, Sandals,
Clogs &Handbags
EXCEPTIONAL QUALITY
AND DESIGN AT
REASONABLE PRICES W
ANN ARBOR
MARLON BRANDO in 1951
A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE
Blanche Due Bois and Stanley Kowalski clash in a downtrodden part in
New Orleans. Vivien Leigh plays Blanche, a fragile, aging Southern
Bells who can't relate with Brando as Stanley, her coarse, brutal bro-
ther-in-law. Also. starring Kim Hunter and Karl MaIden in this famous
screen version by Elia Kazan of the Tennessee Williams' play.
SAT.: Truffaut's MISSISSIPPI MERMAID
CINEMA GUILD TONIGHT AT OLD ARCH. AUD.
7:00 &r 9:05 Admission $1.25

THE DEPARTMENT OF
ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE
PRESENTS
The Hayward Keniston Lecturei
"IN & OUT OF THE DICTIONARY"
by JOHN CIARD:

I

Monday, Oct. 13-4:1O p.m.
in Rackham Amphitheater

I

I

-

SIRHAN DIDN'T KILL RFK

20% OFF SALE
NEW SHIPMENT
HANDMADE
SHEEPSKIN
COATS
For Men, Women
& Children
MAXI
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JACKET
Enjoy the Warmth & Quality
of Sheepskin This Winter.
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320 E. Liberty
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OPEN 6 DAYS A WEEK

I

and THE MOTHERS
OF INVENTION
Tues., Nov. 18, Crisler Arena
RESERVED SEATS $6.00, $5.00

At UAC Box Office
5:30 (763-2071).
first day sale, only.

in lobby of Mich. Union 10:30-
Main floor limit of 6 per person
Sorry, no personal checks.

DOUBLE-WESTERN FEATURE
NICHOLAS RAY'S 1954
JOHNNY GUITAR 7 P.M.
j Nicholas Rav (REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE) has directed a "bizarre, feminine" western with
Joan Crawford as a female Shane. Steriinq Hayden, in the title role, is reunited with Craw-
ford after a five year absence and is forced to fight for her against a town that hates her for
the civilization which she represents. Joan Crawford, Sterling Hayden, Ernest Borqnine, John
Carridine.
HOWARD HAWK'S 1948
RED RIVER 9 P.M.
By universal acclaim, this intense western has joined a select qroup of classic westerns. Hawk
uses and perfects many western film archetypes to fashion a hard-driving plains adventure.
The story of the opening of the Chisholm Trail, Red River dramatizes the "individualistic
American character" and is, as one critic put it,."A maior contribution to American folklore."
John Wayne, Montqomery Clift, Joanne Dru, and Walter Brennan.
SAT. MATINEE 3 p.m. only-Children's Matinee Series presents

.,.r..r,

MIDWEST PREMIERE
THE SECOND GUN
The controversial documentary on the conspi-
racy to kill Senator Robert Kennedy, and the
subsequent cover-up. This film has been an im-
portant catalyst in the ongoing drive to reopen

-YPRESENTS -
WOODY ALLEN Double Feature

-TONIGHT-

in the MLB!

I BANANAS (1971) in MLB 4 at 7:10, 8:50, & 10:30

.d

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