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September 30, 1975 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1975-09-30

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, September 30, 1975

Page Two I HE MICHIGAN DAILY

_

VETERAN
MAKE YOUR WEEKEND PAY
Michigan National Guard
483-3184

Fletcher Hall: The all male HOUSE VOTE SOUGHT:
Fin*-

.....

aorm nouoay nows aoout

X1,.,11.)11111111,, LGC

seeks CIA papers

Free Instruction
POCKET
BILLIARDS
THURSDAY
Michigan Union
3 P.M. and 7 P.M.

By KAREN SCHULKINS
"Knock, knock."
"Who's there?"
"FLETCHER Hall."
"Fletsher who?"
"Fletch'uve never heard
this place."

of

hi
603 eat librty -
SHOWS TONIGHT
at 7:00 and 9:00
OPEN at 6:45
THE LEAN, MEAN 30's, 3
WHEN AMERICA LAUGHED
...TO KEEP FROM CRING
SHOWS TONIGHT
at 7:00 and 9:00
OPEN at 6:45
T~wwil r~ mvi fr C the
and HEAVY TRAFFIC!
-r
s f
® ulvu beionan
TROGRA RMATO 454-,72
THIS IS IT, FOLKS
F INA L DAYS
The Movie Event you've
been woitinq for is waiting
SHOWS TODAY at 1-3-5-7-9
OPEN at 12:45
y u
C1214 a's ad m verlai y g
Geehe 66 B-64 6
LAST TIMES TONIGHT!

WARHOL'S
"FRANKENSTEIN
and DRACULA"
STARTING TOMORROW
A NEW FILM
EVERY DAY!
I ~tIk;RCjL AKt'
JAMES CAAN MA HA -
cA i frIaU Ubtrty-I
TC""E"Ei T

FLETCHER Hall may well be
the least-known building on cam-
pus. For the record it's a small,
pleasant - looking structure on
Sybil Street, nestled among
some private homes. And it's
the only all-male dorm on cam-
pus.
The character in Fletcher Hall
is unique, partly because the
average resident is older than
a typical dorm student.
"A lot of people have heard
bad things, like we're super
jocks or fags, or don't know
what a girl is," said Resident
Advisor Rich Sheppard.
"IT'S NOT a dorm, a frat, or
home, but a collage," said five-
year resident Gary Romeyn.
"It's some place you can be
proud of."
"There are enough freshmen
to keep it interesting and enough
grads to keep it quiet," said
four-year resident Steve Dear-
ing.
Many races, creeds, and coun-

tries are represented here.
"IT'S UNUSUAL because of
the varied backgrounds of resi-
dents from all over the world,"
said Sheppard.
Dwellers have many reasons
for coming, and for staying.
Cost is one reason. An eight
month lease (room) runs $510.
Other reasons for its popularity
include its location, its friendly
atmosphere, cooking facilities,
and quiet.
"I thought about a dorm for
about 50 seconds," said two-year
resident Chuck Schatz. "Girls
are distracting, it's noisy, and
the people are crazy. It's much
easier here than other places on
campus."
"I GOT stuck here. It was my
third choice," said Assistant
Resident AdvisorMike Dress-
nack, "but as soon as you make
some friends, it's ten to one
that you'll stay. It has comara-
derie.E veryone knows every-
one else."
However, Fletcher residents
say they have no problem meet-
ing women.
"I've seen more girls in here
this year than ever before,"
said Resident Director Reggie
Greene. Co-ed picnics, baseball

games, football games, and par-
ties with other dorms prcavide
plenty of opportunity for con-
tact.
FLETCHER traditions range
from fire drills appropriately
timed to announce its bi-annual
picnics to y e a r I y awards
for "Scholarship, Sportsmanship,
and Fletchership." Those who
make the dorm a better place
to live are cited for "Fletcher-
ship."
One of the ways students do
this is to chip in each year for
something new. They now own
furniture, a ping-pong table, a
T.V., a refrigerator, and a pop
machine.
Fletcher also has an interest-
ig history. It's founding father,
Charles Hubard Mooney (Mich-
igan, '97) organized the inde-
pendent Dormitory Corporation
to save the students from merci-
less Ann Arbor landlords.
MOONEY, with the help of
alumni investments, built Flet-
cher with the intention of turn-
ing it over to the University
within several years.
Named after Regent Frank
Ward Fletcher, the dorm was
erected in 1922, the first all-male
dormitory at Michigan.
Fletcher suffered at first from
poor maintenance and supervi-
sion, and in November. 1929
came an even gerater blow to
its already unsavory image.
Two Fletcher students were ar-
rested and six quarts of bonded
'whiskey and three quarts of
apricotbrandy were seized in
a Prohibition-era bust of a stu-
dent-onerated bootleg distrib"-
tion point based in Fletcher's;
attic.

By AP and Reuter
WASHINGTON - The Select
House Intelligence Committee
brushed aside White House of-
fers of a compromise yesterday
and voted to seek support of the
full House in its battle for se-
cret intelligence documents.
The committee approved 10 to
3 a proposed House resolution
declaring defiance of the com-
mittee's subpoenas "to be a
grave matter requiring appro-
priate enforcement."
THE HOUSE is not expected
to take up the resolution before
next week.
The proposed resolution also
directs Central Intelligence Di-
rector Colby to turn over docu-
ments subpoenaed by the com--'
mittee on the 1968 Vietnam Tet
offensive.
Republican efforts to essen-
tially write Ford's compromise
proposal into the House resolu-
tion and to provide that secret
documents could be provided
only to the committee and not
the full 435-member House were
rejected.
THE COMMITTEE also re-
jected an amendment by which
the House would back all com-
mittee subpoenaes except those
that demanded such information
as identities of secret U.S.

agents, foreign agents, present
intelligence activities and "dip-
lomatic exchanges which are se-
cret."
Before the committee vote,
Chairman Otis Pike, (D-N.Y.),
said: "I do think it is time Con-
gress took a stand. And it is
time Congress said we need
these pieces of information."
Among the issues is whether
the committee could have the
names of secret agents which it
requests. The committee has ob-
jected to Ford's proposal that
they could not have the names
of any secret agents involved in
operations which, if disclosed,
would subject the agent to dan-
ger of reprisals.
WHEN A reporter asked Pike'
if he believes the committee
should have wholesale access to
names of secret agents, Pike re-
plied: "No, we're not suggest-
ing that. We're suggesting that
when we need it, we ought to be
able to get it."
In a statement, Colby said the
resolution "goes to the heart of
the question of whether the
United States can conduct intel-
ligence operations essential to
the safety and welfare of our
country."
He said congressional probes
should clarify the nature of
modern intelligence, but in "a

fashion that protects the essen-
tial secrets of intelligence."
"I BELIEVE the intelligence
community has been forthcom-
ing in responding to the legiti-
mate needs of the congressional
committees," he said. However,
". . . I cannot agree to the
transfer of sensitive material in
response to the Sept. 12 sub-
poena in the absence of some
agreed procedure as to its pos-
sible disclosure."
The confrontation became
more bitter last week after Sec-
retary of State Henry Kissinger
ordered middle-level officials at
the State Department not to tes-
tify on policy on intelligence
matters. He ruled that only sen-
ior officials could do so.
Pike has said the enforcement
could be contempt of Congress
citations against possibly Cen-
tral Intelligence Director Wil-
liam Colby or Secretary of State
Henry Kissinger.
ALL THREE Republicans
present at a morning meeting
urged more negotiations to work
out a compromise with Ford
and avoid the constitutional con-
frontation over access to infor-
mation.
The committee's senior Re-
publican, Rep. Robert McClory
of Illinois, said the White House
had promised him it would turn

over volumes of secret informa-
tion as soon as an agreement
was reached.
McClory said it would be
pointless to instead take a time-
consuming fight to the House.
"WE'D BE heading for litiga-
tion and a confrontation that
would lead us nowhere," Mc-
Clory said.
Pike contended the conditions
in Ford's compromise proposal,
even one barring names of se-
cret agents from the commit-
tee, could be used "to withhold
from this committee alomst any-
thing they want to."
Pike backed the assessment of
Chief Counsel A. Searle Field
that this would permit agencies
to withhold not only the names
of spies in Moscow but also the
names of agents whose accurate
intelligence was ignored for po-
litical reasons.
"If we were to accept this lan-
guage it would completely shut
down this investigation," Field
said.
Field said committee investi-
gators have already found that
one agent's report on a Middle
East crisis was ignored "be-
cause it conflicted with a politi-
cal decision." In another case,
he said, an agent's assessment
was given great weight even
though it was "obviously
biased."

A Symposium:
BIOLOGICAL DETERMINISM:
A CRITICAL APPRAISAL
Social Structure-Tues., Sept. 30th
"Ecological Determinism"
JOHN VANDERMEER
Division of Biological Sciences, University of Michigan
3:00 P.M.-RACKHAM AMPHITHEATRE
"The 'Domination of Nature':
Its Social Origins"
MURRAY BOOKCHIN
School of Metropolition and Community Studies,
Ramapo College
7:30 P.M.-RACKHAM AMPHITHEATRE
Workshops in E. Conference Room & E. Alcove

Story says Hearst chose SLA

(Continued from Page 1)
cell to a hospital.
MEANWHILE, in a tape re-
leased from her Los Angeles

After renovations and a brief jail cell, Ms. Harris said that
stint as a women's dorm, the Hearst, whom she knew as
men were back in Fletcher in "Tania," is "a truly beautiful
1960. woman" being manipulated by
The dorm filled with "riwdyvsexist attorneys.
Jocks," according to Wystan "As a woman, I clearly see
Stevens, former resident an gywas a cruel manifestation of a
now an Ann Arbor historian. male-dominated society where
"One guy built a kayak in the women are defined by men as
hallway," he said, "and a zo- being fragile, weak and unable'
ology stu'dent boiled the head to make decisions for them-
of a dissected monkey gn the selves," she said.
bathroom. We played ping-pong, The Rolling Stone article,
watched T.V., s t u d i e d, and' which will not appear on stands
selpt." until later, quotes verbatim
Altogether, Fletcher has his- from purported conversations
tory, character, and color. It's among Hearst, Scott and fellow
quiet, diverse, friendly, but most fugitives William and Emily
of all, says Romeyn, it's "defi- Harris. It said it was Patty who
nitely Fletcher." asked to join the terrorist Sym-
- - - -

bionese Liberation Army four
weeks after her Feb. 4, 1974,
kidnapping.
THE MAGAZINE article does
not deal with specifics of the
bank robbery with which Hearst
is charged. Its narration begins
with the hours following the Los
Angeles shootout.

The article, entitled, "Tania's
World, An Insider's Account of
Patty Hearst on the Run," said
Scott agreed to drive the three
fugitives cross-country if they
gave up all weapons, which they
did after much protest.
Their travels led to New York,}
the Pennsylvania farmhouse andI
finally to a Las Vegas motel

where, the article said, Scott
left Patty alone on Sept. 27,
1974, awaiting arrival of a "new
team" of supporters, the Soliahs.
The article concludes with
Patty about to return to the San
Francisco Bay area. ". . . She
was dedicated to her new beliefs
and she still called herself
Tania," the writers said.

"Extraordinary
*... 'Lucia,
196 . . . is
absolutely
splendid, and
reveals Mr.
Sols's vast
talent for
comedy. I wish
that it might be
seen by all the
sexes: it's the
best discussion of
equality (and
inequality) I've
seen on screen.
-NORA SAYRE
N.Y. Times

LATIN AMERICAN
FILM SERIES
PRESENTS
The
Cuban Epic
of Love

r:)::

::,. : . .. . .. .
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
..Jr:}iJ""
Tuesday, September 30 Society Series, R. Kahn, "AlienationI Mgt. Training; Oct. 6, Burroughs
Day Calendar and Addication: The Meaning' of Corp, Washington U. Law School,
WUOM: Highlights from "Sympo- Work in America," Rackham Lec.I U. of Kentucky Grad Schools; Oct.
sium of the Arts," in recognition Hall, 8 pm. ' 7, Dept. of State (Near Eastern &
of 10th anniversary of legislation Physiology/A-v Ctr.: How I Ran South Asian Affairs), Washington
establishing Nat'l Foundation on Out of Oxygen on Pike's Peak, S. & Lee U/Law. Oct. 8, Upjohn Co.-
Arts & Humanities, 9:30 am. Lee. Hall, Med. Sci. II, S. Lec. Hall, Research positions, U. of Chicago/
North Engineering Library: Orien-' Med. Sci. II, 8 pm. Grad Schools; Oct. 9, Cargill, Inc.,
tation, 1002 Inst. of Science, Tech- IWY: Betty Friedan, "The Wo- Manufacturers Nat'l Bank, North-
nology, 10 am. men's Movement in America: Where western Mutual Life Ins. Co.; Oct.
CEW: Reports from Returning Are We? Where Are We Going?" 10, Carnegit-Mellon U/Grad Sc$.
Women Series - Alice Smuts, "The Hill Aud., 8 pm. of Industrial Admin. Interviews at
Emergence of Child Developmental General Notices Geology: Oct. 7 & 8, Texaco, Inc.,
Sciences, 1910-1930," 328-330 Thomp- CEW: Orientation, Grad Library. Oct. 9 & 10, Exxon Company, A.
son. noon. Oc.;nterviews at Chem.: Upjohn Co.-i
Biophysics: G. Yeh, "Annealing Tues.,Oct. 7; Undergrad Libar Organic MS, PhD & Analytical MS.
Effects'Wed.,eOct. s, 7.30Popm. ,0,CEW; onta Intern'1 has announced the
Effects and Mechanisms in Poly-I Scholarships, from $500-$2,000 of- Amelia Earhart elwship Awathe
mers," 205 P&A, 3:30 pm. frd w nr ra Amelia Earhart Fellowship Awar40
Condensed Matter: T. Witt fered to women returning to UM af- ($3,000) to women for advanced
Condnse Mater:T. W enter an interruption of at least 24 study & research in the areospace
"Renormalizatian Scaling Symmetry consecutive mos.; appis, available, science; write: Zonta Intern's, 89
in Polymer Configurations," 2038 Oct. 1; due, Jan. 14; announce- E.vnBra St.CigoIl
Randall Lab, 4 pm.E. Van Burean St., Chicago, III
Theoretical Seminar: M. S. Chen, ment of winners, April 22, 1976; 60605; deadline: Jan. 1.
Theoeticl Smina: M S. hen contact 328-330 Thimpson, 763-1353
"u-e Universality and Anomalous fortmore into. Law Day, Oct. 21 -- law schools
Dileptons," 1041 Randall Lab, 4 Att. All Members of University will have reps on campus to dis-
pm' Community: President's State of cuss programs admissions require-
Great Lakes Research: D. Baker, the University -- Pres. Fleming ments, tentatively scheduled in
"Meteorological Measurements11 will give his annual address to fac- League; keej in touch with CP&P
around the Cook and Palisades Nu- ulty and, staff in Rackham Lee. for details.
clear Plants," White Aud., Cooley I Hall, 8 pm, Mon., Oct. 6. Dis- Nat. Security Agency 1975 Profes-
Lab, 4 pm. tinguished faculty awards will be sional Qualification Test given in
Biological Determination -eries: presented after the address and a Ann Arbor Nov. 22; deadline appls.
J. H. vandermeer, "Ecologica e- reception in the League will fol- Nov. 8; all liberal arts & math ma-
terminism," 3 pm; M. Bookchin, Ilow. ors must take PQT before apply-
"~The Domination of Nature: Its So.. ngt NA ap. atral val
cial Origins," 7:30 pm, Rackham i Career Planning & Placement able at CP&P; NSA have sched-
Amph. 3200 SAB, 764-7456 uled campus visits Nov. 11 & Feb.
Humanities: Beyond the Protest- Interviews on campus: Sept. 30,: 23
ant Ethic: Work in a Technological Montgomery Ward & Co. for Retail
- -.______ ~Appls. for Foreign Service Officer
Examination to select cands. for
U. S. State Dept. & U. S. Info Ag-
ency availaable in this office; test
the, a * * e a given in Ann Arbor Dec. 0; deadline
" a b r""" " I apps. Oct. 31.
Graduate Public Service Intern-
ship: 2 yr. prog-Interns spend 20
T4 N G N ! !hrs. on job in State agency & also
TONIGH T!!ro2r img
enroll in 10 credit hrs. of grad
VITTORIG DE SICA'S course work at Sangamon State U.,
at Springfried, Ill; grad prog is
usually directly related, to prof.
SE 7:15 only career in govt.; interns receive full
tuition & fees, travel allowance;
One of the first masterpieces of Italian neo-realism, made & a monthly stipend ($325 during
in 1946. In terms of sheer emotional impact, SHOESHINE academic yr., $650 during summer)
is brilliant. "If people cannot feel SHOESHINE, what can details available at CP&P.
they *feel?"-.-Pauline Koel. In Italian with English sub-
titles. And ________________________

and

Revolution

i

INCLUDES:
TOSSED
SALAD
BAKED
POTATO
HEARTHSTONE
TOAST

THURSDAY, OCT. 2

NAT. SCI. AUD.
$1.50

8 P.M. ONLY

Sponsored by the Group on Latin American issues

AFTER 4:00 P.M.

ROUGH RIDERS and
LEVI'S BUSH JEANS
are at
SAM'S STORE
o _ _
t _

YOUR BUCK
BUYS MORE AT .. .

v~ invrs

FEL INI'S

ROMA

at 9 only

Rather than a look at Rome by Fellini. this 1972 film is
another dazzlinq look at Fellini with Rome as the back-
ground. Includes a hilarious and irreverent Vatican fashion
show and cameo appearances by Anna Maqnani and Gore
Vidal.
BOTH FILMS IN AUD. A, ANGELL HALL
$1. 25 each or
special double feature admission price '
-~ ~

THE MICHIGAN DAILY .
Volume LXXXVI, No. 23
Tuesday, September 30, 1975
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48108.
Published d a i l y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
ters); $13 by mail outside Ann Ar-
bor.,
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6 in Ann Arbor;
$7 by mail outside Ann Arbor.

Presents

I

i

"THE WOMEN'S MOVEMENT IN AMERICA. ..

Un WHERE ARE WE?
WHERE ARE WE GOING?"
BETTY FRIEDAN

SKY IG

BETTY FRIEDAIN
THE FIRST IN A SERIES OF SPEAKERS IN HONOR OF
INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S YEAR

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