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December 10, 1976 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1976-12-10

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Friday, December 1,,1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pone Three

tridayDeceber_1,_1976THE.MCHIGADAIL

-ad I , - c%

Russian Nobel prize winner
reflects on 1975 struggles

ONE CHILD ESCAPES:

--r-400--r- -I- -

MOSCOW OP) - Andrei Sak-
harov, 1975 Nobel Peace Prize
laureate, said yesterday there
has been some progress in the
struggle for individual freedom
in the Soviet Union. But he
said there has been no letup
in government pressure against
him and other dissidents in the
year since he was awarded the
prize.
On Dec. 10 last year, Sakha-
rov's wife accepted the Nobel
prize on his behalf because
the Soviet Union refused to let
him travel to Oslo. Yesterday,
the 55-year-old nuclear physi-
cist and political dissident talk-
ed with The Associated Press
about what has happened since
then. He was interviewed in
the bedroom of his modest two-
room flat, a 10-minute drive
from the Kremlin.
S A K H A R 0 V cited as
progress in the human rights
fight what he said , was a
change in the "psychological at-
mosphere" in the Soviet Un-
ion, brought about by scientific
and philosophical seminars, art
exhibits and concerts held in
private apartments without of-
ficial approval.
"The single most important
event was the organization of
a group to help fulfill the Hell
sinki agreements in the U.S.
S.R., headed by Yuri Orlov,"
Sakharov said. "It is address-

ing itself to the problems of
court and psychiatric repres-
sions, the situations in the
camps and prisons, the sup-
pression of religious groups,
national discrimination against
the Crimean Tartars, the viola-
tions of national cultures in the
republics, the problems of emi-
gration and reunification of
families."
The Helsinki agreement, en-
dorsed by the Soviet Union, the
United States and many other
countries, in effect ratified
Europe's post-World War II
boundaries as permanent while
calling for a freer flow of infor-
mation, people and ideas be-
tween East and West and for
human rights improvements in
Warsaw Pact nations.
D E S P I T E the improve-
ment he cited, Sakharov said
he has become increasingly
worn down by continued of-
ficial condemnation and by his
responsibilities as the No. 1
spokesman for dissent in this
country. While vowing to con-
tinue his campaign, he said he
welcomed the influx of younger
people into the civil rights
movement to help share the
burden.
Sakharov also said he looks
to the future for himself and
his family "with great anxie-
ties." He did not elaborate.
He said he doubted he will be

allowed to travel abroad "for,
the long-time future."
Excerpts from the questions
and answers in the interview
follow:
Q - WHAT EFFECT has the
Nobel award had on your life
and work in what is called the
"democratic movement"?
A - It has been contradic-
tory and contrasting. The in-
fluence of public opinion has
been very important and very
positive. Yet all this year, the
authorities seemed to ignore
my changed public status and
increased public authority. As
before, I was not permitted
to attend dissident trials .
as before, my overseas tele-
phone and mail communica-
tions were cut off throughout
the year.
Q - How has your private
life been in the past year?
A-For the first 10 months,;
I had no residential permit, no'
official permission to live here
in Moscow. Pressure on our
family certainly continues. At-
tacks in the press are one form
of this pressure. My son-in-law
is still without a job in what
is, in fact, official pressure on
our close and loving family. My
friends are constantly being
harassed. Besides the effect on
them, this is another way of
getting at me.

kills family
UPPER ARLINGTON, Ohio Bolin's dead husband, Ronald. THE FAMILY'S pastor, the
(AP) - She stayed at home, He was founder and owner of Rev. Luther Stommer of the
raising the children, the moth- a mechanical and machine de- Upper Arlington Lutheran
er of an "ideal" suburban fam- sign company. church, said the children were
ily who police say bought a A neighbor across the street active, especially in the choir.
pistol from a gun shop in Oc- from the Bolin's ranch-style "The children were beautiful,
tober and hid it in her sew- house, Mrs. Stephen Young, de- lovely," he said.
ing kit. scribed the Bolins as "an ideal Mrs. Bolin, Tamela Jean, and
Patricia Bolin, 40, took the family. They were fantastic 9-year-old Todd Matthew died
.22-caliber gun from the kit people. Quiet but fun-loving." in the house, police said. The
Wednesday night and used it ANOTHER NEIGHBOR said 43-year-old father died hours
to kill her executive nusband her 12-year-old daughter had later after being hospitalized
and two of her three children been a playmate of Tamela for gunshot wounds of the head,
before shooting herself to death, Jean, 12, one of the victims. neck and chest. The children
officers said., "She the mother was very were shot several times in the
POLICE SAID they were call- reserved, aloof almost," she head, the county coroner said.
ed to a home in this wealthy said. The Bolin children's teachers
Columbus suburb Wednesday "She was the kind of person remembered Mrs. Bolin as be-
evening when Mrs. Bolin's 15- you would wave to in the gro- ing helpful with school projects
year-old daughter fled from the cery parking lot, but I never and with driving children on
house. The daughter said she knew her. Nobody really did." outings.
returned from a friend's house
and Mrs. Bolin tried to shoot
her, pulling the trigger three L.
times on the then-empty gun,
officers said. SPECIAL MIDNIGHT SHOW
After the daughter fled, police TONIGHT AND SATURDAY'
said, Mrs. Bolin apparently re-
loaded the gun, for which she'd SAMOA WEED, GUNS«-
paid $51.50, and then shot her- AND RAGGAE MUSIC
self.
"The place looked like a THE SHERIF!
slaughter house," said police
Capt. Kenneth Borror. "We have -..
to think she had this planned."

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
..5:.'t.55. ': '* vgb;J"N H. SSr".9V..SSSV.l:" ; Iv "::Ai"r S t:"'4:r:,{ t¢ '5'n ta;.s2 :}"-.

Friday December 10
DAY CALENDAR
WUOM: "Scientific Advancement,"
2nd in series of 3 documentaries,
"Oceans," 10 a.m.
Int'l. Ctr.: "Quality of Life Index
Discussion, Part II: A Program for
Foreign Students," 603 E. Madison,
2:30 p.m.
Social Personality Developmental
Psychology/Michigan Women in Sci-
ence: Judith Rodin, Yale, "The Pro-
cess of Aging: How Inevitable are
the effects?" Large Conf. Rm., 6th
fir., ISR, 3:30 p.m.
Astronomy: A. Cowley, "Low Mass
X-ray Binaries," P&A Colloq. Rm.,
4 p.m.
Biological Sciences: Taki ig Our
Bodies Back: The Women's Health
Movement, 2042 Nat. Sci., 4 p.m.
Ski Team: "Ski Swap," Sports
Coliseum, 4-10 p.m.
UAC Soph Show: "How to Suc-
ceed in Business Without Really
Trying," Mendelssohn, 8 p.m.
PTP: Etherege's The Man of Mode,
Arena Theatre, Frieze, 8 p.m.
Music School: Wind Ensemble,
Symphony Band, Hill Aud., 8 p.m.
Dance Company: The Planets: La
Creation du Monde, Power, 8 p.m.
Ark: Paul Siebel, country, blues,
1420 Hill, doors open, 8:30 p.m.
GENERAL NOTICES
U-M Band's "Michigan Youth Band
and Wind Ensemble" will present
their first concert of the 1976 sea-
son at St. Thomas High School Sat.,
Dec. 11, at 7:30 p.m. The band, un-
der the direction of Prof. Thomas L.
Dvorak, will perform works by Hu-
sa, Milhaud, Grainger, and others.
Admission is $1.00 for adults and
25 cents for students, available at
the door. For more info, contact
Prof. Dvorak, 763-3017.
STUDENT ACCOUNTS: Your at-
tention is called to the following
rules passed by the Regents at their
meeting on February 28, 1936: "Stu-
dents shall pay all accounts due the
University not later than the last
day of classes of each semester or
summer session. Student loans
which are not paid or renewed are
subject to this regulation; however,
student loans' not yet due are
exempt. Any unpaid accounts at the
close of business on the last day
of classes will be reported to the
Cashier of the University and
"(a) All academic, credits will be
withheld, the grades for the se-
mester or summer session just com-
pleted will not be released, and no
transcript of credits will be issued.
"(b) All students owing such ac-
counts will not be allowed to reg-
ister in any subsequent semester
or summer session until payment
has been made."
CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
3200 SAB - 764-7460
Residency in. Clinical Pharmacy at
Rhode Island Hospital beginning
6/22/77. Write Louis P. Jeffrey, Dir.
of Pharmacy Services, Rhode Island
Hospital, 593 Eddy St., Providence,
RI 02902.
Lyndon B. Johnson Sch. of Pub-
lic Affairs offers Grad Fellowships
for 1977-78 leading to the degree of
M.S. of Public Affairs. Write L.B.J.
School of Pub. Affairs, the U. of
Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712.
Andover Teaching . Fellowships-
available at Phillips Academy, And-
over, Mass. for graduates interested

in a teaching career - usually teach
two courses, provide guidance &
counseling in Dorm & Coach or di-
rect an extra-curricular activity.
Stipend: $4,500 + rm. & brd. Ap-
plications available at CP&P or
write: Peter Q. McKee, Assoc. Head-
master, Phillips Academy, Andover,
Mass. 01810. Deadline: Jan. 15, 1977.
Bar-Liau University in Tel Aviv
area offers religious Kibbutz pro-

gram: Earn college credits while
participating in Kibbutz life & so-
ciety. 2 semesters completed in col-
lege required. Fall year program
$1,400 or (1) semester $1,150. Bro-
chures available at CP&P.
"JWB Personnel Reporter:" A Fall
1976 brochure of middle Manage-
ment Opportunities is available in
this office. It lists current job open-
ings in Jewish community centers.

BORROR SAID the only ques-
tion, aside from why she did
it, was what happened to seven
bullets. He said 17 cartridge
cases were found, but only 10
bullets were located. He said
he expects some of the missing
bullets to be found during au-
topsies.
"When we heard about it, it
blew our minds," said Beverly
Kearney, the first wife of Mrs.
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
DANCE CAMPANY
Presents
Elizabeth Weil Bergmann's
THE PLANETS
by Gustave Hoist
Gay Delanghe's
LA CREATION DU MONDE
by Darius Milhaud
POWER CENTER FOR
THE PERFORMING ARTS
DECEMBER 10, 11, 12
Performances December 10,
1 1, at 8:00 P.M.
December 12 at 3:00

i
t

Lina Wertmullers Sele i

Dec 10/11
Friday& Saturday
7&9 $1:50

I

ANGELL HALL AUD. A CINEMAII

_

I

,ANN AI**CI FILM CC-CU
TONIGHT IN MLB-Friday, Dec. 10
BLAZING SADDLES
(Mel Brooks, 1974) MLB 3, 8:45 & 10:30
Mel Brooks, convulsingly hilarious burlesque of the Old West is
perhaps the last word in Western parodies. The lewd, vulgar and
wacky plot revolves around a black sheriff in an all-white town.
Marvelously comic performances by Clevon Little, Gene Wilder,
Alex Karras, Madeline Kahn. "Blazing Saddles is an awesomely
funny movie."-New York Times.

-0

LA RUPTURE
(Claude Chabrol, 1970)

MLB 4, 7 only

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVII, No 76
Friday, December 10, 1976
is edited and managed by studentsI
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published d a i l y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription
rates: $12 Sept. thru April (2 semes-
ters); $12 by mail outside Ann
Arbor.
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann
Arbor; $7.50 by mail outside Ann
Arbcr.

i

NADA
(Claude. Chabrol, 1974) MLB 4, 9 only
Claude Chabrol is the forgotten' director of the French New Wave.
Although never as popular as Truffaut or as controversial as
Godard, he has amassed a body of work unequaled in techniques
and personal touch by any French director of his generation. His
films are seldom shown outside of New York, where they are met
with near unanimous critical acclaim.
LA RUPTURE is, of all Chabrol's films, the one in which lie
walks the tightrope between brutality and love, pain and pleasure.
Stephane Audran is superb as the young wife whose husband has
gone beserk on LSD and whose father-in-law is searching for
evidence of moral depravity. "An eerie, frightening, crazy movie."
-Chicago Daily News. "The best film of the year."-Andrew
Sarris. With Stephane Audran, Jean-Paul Cassel and Michel
Bouquet.
NADA is a brutally direct thriller which lets its very eloquent
political message speak for itself. A gioup of terrorists kidnap the
American ambassador to France and hold him for ransom. The
French authorities purposely assign a savage and over-zealous
officer to track the gang to its hideout. The explosive climax
proves, in Chabrol's words, "Terrorism and the police are just two
jaws of the same trap." "An exciting movie! A picture you'll
attend breathlessly every inch of the way!"-Archer Winsten,
N.Y. Post. With Mariangela Melato and Fabio Testi. French with
subtitles.
$1.25-SINGLE FEATURE
"
Tomorrow: NASHVILLE/ALICE IN WONDERLAND

Af
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COLUMBIA PICTURES PRESENT A MARTIN RITT
JACK ROLLINS *CHARLESH JOFFE PRODUCTION
WOODY ALLEN AS"THE FRONT"
WITH ZERO MOSTEL HERSCHEL BERNARDI
MICHAEL MURPHY ANDREA MARCOVICCI " WRITTEN BY WAt.TFR BERNSTF'N
EXECUIVE PRODUCER CHARLES H JO F FE PRODUCED& DIRECTEU BYMARTIN H14
A PERSK -BRIGHT DEVON, EATURE
PGPARETAIAGUIDANCE SUGGESTEDOC cumtbia
L dM1 MATIR ALMY ;4 ILdIiA W R 4.AG e 4 * , E

8th Tremendous
Week
SHOWS TONIGHT
AT 7:00 AND9:00
OPEN 6:45

FRANK CAPRA'S 1946
IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE
James Stewart stars as a conscientious son who takes over the family busi-
ness when his father dies despite his longings to travel and go to school. On

11U Iil RL'iI, enic3bvCNNUGTPRMC US-

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