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December 10, 1976 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1976-12-10

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

_

7TH ANNUAL U-M SKI TEAM
University
NEW OR USED ALPINE & X-COUNTRY SKI
EQUIPMENT, LOTHNG, ETC.oplaint
7 2 1 5. F ifth at H ill St. C t n e mp ag )
Where: U-M SORTS COLISEUM 71S it tHl t
TO SELL: Bring items to Coliseum on Friday, Dec. 10, (continueddfro t Page)
4 p~m. to 10 p.m. THE TRIBE said it wouldc
TO BUY: Come browse in Coliseum on Saturday, Dec. 11 accept the "social fraternity"t
9 am. to 7 p.m. option if it could pay for thec
INFO, call 995-5015 or 668-6074 Union space and continue to
Sales commissions charged to help support U-M Ski Team hold meetings there. University
Please no cable bindinks or lace boots (except child's) President Robben Fleming thent
-- -------- - suggested that the group writet
a charter that declared it did
not discriminate by race or
TONIGHT national origin.a
The executive officers also+
a panel discussion on decided that Vice-President for1
Student Services Henry John-
"HEALTH AND HEALING son would head a committee
to decide if Michigamua ac-
ENERGY" tually is a social fraternity.
Johnson's committee is cru-
with a dozen healers from cial. If it decides against the
theAnnArboraTribe, the group may be forc-
nn A or area ed from campus. The commit-
tee is to be composed of John-
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10 son himself, an MSA member,
8 P.M. HERB TEA, 8:30 DISCUSSION University attorney William;
Lemmer and ThomasEasthope,
CANTERBURY HOUSE"
218 N. DIVISION STREET BECAUSE Y
corner of Catherine and Division
AC-H IEVED
It's10 thadt 1*
lie ~epa dep a rt ne :. ; .t...:
secondO no1D (.
thesk
may.

handling of Triue
has students upset

an assistant to Johnson who
conducted the initial investiga-.
tion of the social - honorary
question.
B'LUMENTHAL at-
tacked the proposed commit-
tee.
"It's biased from the start,"
she said. "Tom Easthope al-
ready came out and said it
(Michigamua. was a social or-
ganization. It's (the University)
going to set up this committee
and say Michigamua's social
as long as it pays for the

hope's belief that the group
essentially social doesr
mean Easthope is incapable
conducting a fair investigati
E U N I C E B URN
chairwoman of the Wome
Commission, said the p
doesn't sit well with her.
"I really haven't made
my mind, but I feel a li
uneasy with that kind of
out," she said last nig
"There's no doubt that peo
have thought of it as an hon
ary for years.
"It seems to me that1
way they should go would
to admit women," she went
"They might also get back
the service aspect of it."
Burns referred to the dir
ished Michigamua tradition
working with University adr
istrators, faculty, and stud
groups to foster construc
change on campus.

I

Friday, December 10, 1976
ore me1a women- Suttoni
(Continued from Page 1) "I don't feel so gloomyy. I up to deal with our money,"
of women reporters "who deal- think we need to look at the. she said.
ly mean it" will produce more problem and see what needs to"These policies have been
female editors in the future. be done. The solution may not called 'among the most string-
is "When I started, I guess I be on print at all, it may be ent in the business' by some,
not had supreme confidence that something coming over the TV: and 'pious nonsense by others.
of I would be treated on my mer- screen," she speculated. Per-' If we're going 'to cover political
on. it," rather than pre-judged on haps, Sutton suggested, a read- bribes and payoffs, we don't
. account of sex, Sutton said. er might be able to punch in want to be in the position of
S, ount ic abilities were a subject like weather and get the pot calling the kettle
n's Her journalistic 'abilities were nisatrd-ton hebck"s d
clan borne out over the years by an instant read-out on the black" she said.
numerous awards received by screen, rather than having a -- - - e ai
humer departments. r pile of newsprint dropped on
up he de a m na-his or her doorstep.
ttle While she was managing edi- Sutton recently began work
an tor, the Courier - Journal re- on a study project looking at!
ght. ceived the coveted Sigma Del- the idea of separate newspaper
)ple ta Chi and Roy Howard awards editions "tailored" to special-
nor- for public service, based on ized audiences. (sIK S 0
the paper's coverage of Louis- "The ultimate goal is to de-
the ville's school desegregation con- liver packages of information
be troversy in 1975. in the mixes people want.
on. There would be a general news- re a s u
to NATIONALLY, newspaper paper and then, layered into
readership figures have declin- that, someone who wanted
nin- ed in recent years, largely as world news but no sports would
of a result of competition from get world events," she ex-I
nin- television news. This has be- plained.
dent come "a major concern among
tive major metropolitan dailies," LATER, AT Rackham, Sut- (continuedfromPage1)
according to Sutton. ton talked about the growing .
-_de__d__.______aist__cdewith Moscow are no substitute
end 'journalistic code for military security.
ofethics over the past few Carter's session with Clifford
years, and the moves that thecaedrn'aaylvgsis
Courier - Journal has made of back-to-back meetingswith
in this area.. his transition advisers, mem
Charging that accepting free bers of Congress, representa-
W ST T I D E tickets, meals or other things tives of business and labor gov
L 1 1 L as value can undermine a re-
porter's credibility, Sutton en- ernors from economically-trou-
BOO K SH HO P dorsed the "take nothing" poli- bledstates n the northeast, t
B ~ K ~ H~ Pcy' in effect at the Courier- otgoing director of the CIA
995-1891 Journal. and potential Cabinet appoint-
"We buy our own tickets for ees.
-113 W. Liberty, Ann Arbor, Michigan concert reviews. We began to A .sorce close to Carter said
Used & Rare Books Bought & Soldj pay for books and reviewing, he is considering Rep. Barbara
tbut the publishers weren't set Jordan (D-Tex.)U to be his am
- hassador to the United Nations.

room.".
In his report, Easthope did
say he found social aspects in
the group, but also asserted
that it clearly received assist-
ance from the University.
Johnson last night denied that
the committee is "biased from
the start." He said that East-
OU'VE
S.I

i
I

S
h
-
t-
[-
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t-
d,
E-
3.

NL 4

:. . '"
J!
C -rI

The experiences that have "carved" your real achievements
are the personal ones. Wear a class ring and remember.
Order on Ring Day and save 5%.
Thursday .& Friday, Dec. 9th & 10th
549 E. UNIVERSITY AVE.

Daily Classifieds
Get Results

3150 Carpenter L J Ann Arbor M 971-4310

SCHOOL.KIDS, the store with the best jazz selection in town,
presents the ENTIRE "two-fer" reissue catalogue from the,
jazz vaults of
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A Jordan aide said no one on
Carter's staff had approached
her with any suggestion about
that nost or any other.
CARTER'S MEETINGS were
',ialiahted by a, oronosal from
b -usiness leader that the Pres-
irent-elect recommend a perma-
npnt tax cl.r instead of a one-
time rebate: a Carter promise
to the g'-erorrs that he will
a "ilb-8-elned national
M_ a"v nol;-v by Aoril, and the
'nl;-Prv of a rnt' tvge to the
PrPident-elect from Israeli
P-,me Ml.,ictar Yit7hak Rabin.
lThe rn'SSa e was delivered by
S-n. Ri,'hard Stone (D-Fla.),
wno visit-d Tsrapl in November.
Stone told renorters it was "not
annronrinto" to discuss the mes-
sn-e l~'P"v. Ho said discus-
sdnc of TSrael took up most of
his 35-minute session with Car-
ter.
('artar al~o met with Abraham
Ribicoff (D-Conn.), another sen-
ator who returned recently from
the Middle East. Ribicoff said
he told the Presidept-elect that
1977 will present an excellent
chance for peace negotiations.
-Ribicoff renewed, his 'request
that Kissinger be retained in
Carter's administration to han-
dle Middle East talks.
"HE (CARTER) LISTENED,
we discussed it, and he was
noncommittal," Ribicoff said.
Gov.-elect Richard Snelling of
Vermont; a Republican, who re-
ported Carter's promise of an
energy-policy by April, said the
President-elect told the gover-
nors it will address energy
needs ..in the Northeast. The
area wants a regional energy
and development corporation
backed by federally guaranteed
bonds.
"There was a responsiveness
there, a willingness to help that
was refreshing," said Gov. Mi-
chael Dukakis of Massachusetts.
Dukakis also said Carter is
thinking of establishing "a two-
tier welfare system that would
distinguish between those who
can work and those who can-
not. He made the point rather
emphatically that if money is
freed u~p by this we should use
it' in our cities."'
Milliken
to ba'.n
aerosals
(Continued from Page I)

Ii

Nw

HOW TO GET RID OF l
(or sell)
YOUR FALL TERM BOOKS
WITHOUT REALLY TRYING?
Just lake advantage of the
Michigan Daily Classified Book Drive
WHERE? Stop in at the Michigan Daily
420 Maynard Street
HOW: Fill out an order form listing your name,
phone number, and the course number.
- -We will place that information in the
proper department category, and your ad
-'willrun for 3 days -unless your books sell
- --.::any sooner.
-.-" - . . COST? Just $1.00 for three days.
.": . 'Pre-payment required.
- .
....:..:::.:;:":":::': WHEN? Beginning immediately at the onset of
Winter Term-January 7th.

The Senate
effective date
January, 1978

moved back the
of the bill from
to January, 1979.

BULLARD SAID he agreed
to go along with this delay be-
caule sending the measure to a
House-Senate conference. com-
mittee at this late date would
be "potentially disastrous."
.He said the bill still consti-
tutes "a strong step !forward
for environmental protection
here in Michigan."
The move to ban freon gas in
spray cans was a result of
scientific studies which indicat-
ed that the gas tends to break
down the ozone layer of the
atmosphere.
Some medical uses of freon
are exempted from the bill.
IT' NO

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