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November 07, 1976 - Image 5

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Michigan Daily, 1976-11-07

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Sunday, November 7, 1976

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

Sunday, November 7, 1976 THE MICHiGAN DAILY Page Five

m i

a

SUNDAY MAGAZINE

BOOKS

Marxism

and

America's

future

'

THE TWILIGHT OF CAP-
ITALISM, by Michael Har-j
rington. Simon and Schuster:1
New York, 446 pp.
By PHILLIP BOKOVOY
SINCE FRANKLIN Roosevelt's
New Deal, many people have
believed that American society
has become increasingly social-
istic. They point to Social Se-
curity, Medicaid and various'
other programs as evidence4
that wealth and income is being,
more fairly distributed.
But Michael Harrington, in
The Twilight of Capitalism, con-I
tends that all this is a fallacy,
spread by some of the highest I

government officials and the foreign royalties and import┬░
mightiest corporate powers in quotas as examples of govern-}
the world. rment policy that has helped the'
Harrington, a u t h o r of The: oil companies maintain large
Other America-the book cred- profits and life-or-death control'
ited with inspiring President over the world's 'economies.l
Kennedy's War on Poverty - Many observers have cited the
bases his theory on a scholarly rise in government-financed re-
analysis of the current eco- search as an example of social-j
nomic situation throughout the istic trends in the government.
world ,and most specifically the But Harrington suggests that
United States. we look at where the profits for
His basic premise is that these endeavors go. And where
capitalistic societies adapt to they go, he says, is right into
social turbulence in a way to the accounts of the largest cod-
protect the interests of those in porations.
power-the corporations. The solution to these prob-I
Harrington cites the oil deple- lems, he rightly contends. is,

the world would rise up against new society, "Karl Marx must tructs a social scheme which
the exploitive leaders of a cap- be our comrade in the strug- would be less repressive than
italist society.) gle." our current system.
In general, American workers To Harrington, Soviet Com- Harrington's analysis of Marx
are not exploited to the degree munism is a misinterpretation and his works falls down in one
they were at the time Marx of Marx. Harrington contends important respect. Much of the
wrote. But still Harrington that after a careful examina- first half of the book is, so dry
doesn't believe that the potential tion 6f Marx's works, it is clear that not many non-economists
for a proletarian revolution has that the Soviet system is not would want to wade through it.
passed. pure Marxism. But the richness of the second
He predicts a period of crisis, I Harrington's gripe with the half, with its fascinating infor-
leadingrdirectlypodoftecri Hdmation about many of our social
rent recesison-inflation, will whaSovietsMarx lies in actualle definition ofinstitutions and certain power-
ren "ecsioninlaio," il watMax ctaly matwe ful people's attempts to run the
continue to erode the financial he said society was an "organi e c o n o m y, is a compelling
position of the worker. The re- whole." He spends a consider-eenuhraotosgtruh
forms that capitalism has un- able amount of time explaining the work.
dergone to correct its defects that a Marxism society does the__rk
PhirainoBoko-voy i s aDailynnHarrin tton

tion allowance, tax credits forl

'The Kansas Case
tOontinued from Page 3) "on top of the i
seemed to be.
of the 19 women in the 94th When Keys won
Congress, she won her seat by Tuesday, she also
defeating a two-term state rep- special surprise. U
resentative bye17,000 votes her, her husband U
capturing 55 per cent of the e, er huan Wsads
vote. Previously, her political !baeapanwtasw
experience had been limited ptoaf campanj eas
serving in the Kansas McGov- and they enjoyed a
emn campaign in 1972. She is the herheadquarters in
sister-in-law of Colorado Sen. hotel.
Gary Hart, who was a high- The last one to arri
ranking McGovern staffer, ea tubngtha
which is how she got involved ed and bubbig, th
in that race.s reserved Keys was
well-wishers and h
Despite the shadow which claimed, "There ar
her marriage placed on -her calls to return from,
campaign, Keys' determination country tonight. W
to make good governmerit the! very happy; this h
deciding issue in the race great night."
eventually placed victory in --
her hands.
The turning point was a tele-'
vised debate, staged only a
week before the election. An
intensive media campaign was Special Attract
timed to coincide with it. Af-
ter the debate, Keys had recap-
tured the lead, 49-41 according y
to one newspaper poll. And of
those who watched the debate, Performing
52 per cent thought Keys had Oedipu
won, while only 17 per cent
thought Freeman had outspoken "NobilitySwiftn
Keys.-As the debate shifted the and H
focus from Keys as a married
woman to Keys as an incum- "Ls 'mo
bent, Freeman's attacks on her I Nv & =
residency status began to back-; o. 6 :
fire. His credibility dropped fur- And
ther when he began to deny that je Cam
he had even brought up the is-
sue. "I get the feeling Martha's
trying to introduce her divorce; "Boisterousir
and remarriage as an issue per-
haps to try to create sym-I Knockabout l
pathy," Freeman said.
By this time however the 7 &~vus
mood of the public had already Nov.7 2&8
wife who normally voted Re-
publican and had been lean- PowerCe
ing to Freeman before the de- Tickets availabte at PTP Ti
Mendelssohn Theatre Lobby, M
bate threw her support towards For InormationCall :7
Keys afterwards, noting how

4
ssues" she
re-election
received a
nknown to
andy grab-
soon as his
wrapped up,
boisterous
[bration at
za Topeka
ive, delight-
e normally
mobbed by
happily ex-
e so many
all over the
Ve're very,
as been a
-ions.
tess
Drror!
n
everenit,
& Fun!"
pm
nter
cket Offie
on.-Fri 10-, 2
64-0450

Y ...,r. , h ave not worked, as evidtenced not have to have allprsd
Marxism. And his book per- by the. system today. veloing in the same manner,
forms a valuable service in ad- eias the Soviets claim.
vancing the possible influence HE BIG issue with the corn-
of Marxism in America: it is a He maintains the Soviets have
gng revolution according to;
cogent and intelligent explana- Harrington, is "whether the I used this argument to destroy,
ion of how Marxism theory re- w collectivist society will Marxism to justify supressing
mains relevant now in this "rpressolesrate" the peope any dissent in their society. But
country. It also predicts a plau- otep worldeays thatlIHarrington's "New Marx" rec-
sible scenario for the theory be- of the world. He says that if ognizes the different demands
coming the guiding force in people are to be free in this of a diverse society. He con-
American government.
Harrington explains that one I I
of the main traditionaliargu- AS ANN ARBOR'S
ments against Marxism in this
country is that the theory can't
be appied to the current eco-,
nomic system b e c a u s e the CA EJEC A I T
workers don't fLel exploited in
this country. (Marx based much We Custom make Cakes for any and
of his theory on the premisea(I
that eventuaily the workers of ccasions.
We also have Pastries, Coffee Cakes,
and an assortment of other Baked
I 4 Goods.
┬░ -.SUGAR BIN BAKERY
at the corner of Liberty & Main
3150 carpenter Road.Ann Arbor.9n7-4310 300 S. MAIN 761-7532
WIN A FE
WINDJAMMER CRUISE
GARGOYLE, U. of M.'s own humor magazine, is giving away a
free 6 day Windjammer Caribbean cruise. To win, put your
name, address and phone number on a card or paper. Write
"I READ THE GARGOYLE" across the top and leave the card
with any participating store on State St., N. University, S.
University or Liberty St. The cards twill be picked. up and a
winner will be chosen. Full rules and information may be
found in the Fall 1976 GARG or at the Student Publications
Building. THE DEADLINE IS NOV. 10, 1976.
{Y
GARGOYLE
A Foolish Indiscretion

Phillip Bokovoy is a Daily tf wie.H rigo
statf wvriler. H rigo
I Ann Arbor Stamp Club Prese nts:
AAPFX '76'
STAMP EXHIBITION and BOURSE
Briarwood Mall Community Room
SATURDAY, NOV. 16-10 AM-8 PM
SUNDAY, NOV. 7-11 AM-5 PM
PUBLIC IS INVITED

City Planning at Harvard
Are you interested in;
Controlling growth?
Revitrlizing thewcentral city?
Cleaning up the environment?
Housing the poor?
Improving urban transportation?
A meeting to discuss Graduate Studies in
the Department of City & Regional Plan-
ning at Harvard University with a faculty
representative will be held
TUES., NOV. 9, 1976
2-5:00 p.m.
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
CHOIRS AND ORCHESTRA
present
GERSHWIN'S
PORGY AND BESS
(CONCERT VERSION)
and
RHAPSODY IN BLUE
THOMAS HILBISH, Conductor
WILLIS PATTERSON, Bass
GLENDA KIRKLAND, Soprano
MONDAY, NOV. 22-8 P.M.
HILL AUDITORIUM
-GENERAL ADMISSION-
Adults $2.50 Shtudents w/lD $1.50

SATYAJIT RAY StRIES 1971
SIMABADDHA (The Target)
This part of Ray's Calcutta trilogy presents a transition from rural to
urban life. A young self-made man unscrupulously climbs the executive
ranks of a large corporation and finds himself in conflict with his tra-
ditions. Ray looks at the coercive influence of ambition and greediness.
TUES.: Ray's WORLD OF APU(
CINEMA GUILD" TONIGHT AT OLD ARCH. AUD.
7:00CEG 9:OS Admission $1.25
EXPERIMENTAL FILMS
FEATURING:
Ernie Gehr's WAIT
Jonas Mekas' CIRCUS NOTES

I

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