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November 07, 1976 - Image 4

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Michigan Daily, 1976-11-07

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Page Four

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, November 7, 1976

Page Four THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, November 7, 1976

' U
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November 13
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SUNDAY MAGAZINE

LOOKING

THE WEEK

IN REVIEW'

Prez-dent Cottuh
"F CAME ALL THE way
through 22 months," the
weary candidate told his home-
town admirers at dawn in
Plains, "and I didn't get chok-l
ed up until I . . ." He stopped,
turned and embraced his wife,
Rosalyn, and for once, the great
big patented Jimmy Carter
smile was joined by tears of
joy. The election was finally
over, and he had won.
It was a narrow victory, to be
sure, but Carter's sdefeat of
President Ford was, in a word,
remarkable.
The week began with the
polls showing the race for the
White House in a dead heat and

the former Georgia governor
trying to dodge an embarras-
sing political incident at his
Baptist church. A black pastor
who was not a Baptist, not a
resident of Plains, and who had
previously sought office as a
Republican, attempted to join
the church despite its archaic,
segregationist rule barring
black membership.
Instead, the church cancelled
its Sunday services. While there
was no evidence, the affair had
been coordinated by Ford's
backers, it was widely viewed
as politically motivated and the
President Ford Committee lost
no time in exploiting the contro-

ed calls for Carter to resign to the Minnesotan's popularityI
from the church, but his deep that the enthusiastic crowd!
Baptist faith meant too much to booed the mention of his Repub--I
him, and he argued that he lican counterpart's name -I
could best fight such racism Robert Dole - louder than they
from within the church. did Nixon's and Ford's.
Both candidates wound up Election night tabulations
their campaigns with last hur- gave Carter a slim but steady
rahs in Michigan, rated by lead over Ford. Reports of an
some pollsters as a toss-up unusually heavy voter turnout
state and carrying a 21-elec- went sour, and it was clear
toral vote payoff. At a rally in neither candidate was headed
a Livonia shopping center, Ford for a quick, decisive victory.
talked basketball with Johnny ! But as the sun and vote-count-
Orr and appealed to home state i ing moved west, the Southern
pride for votes. "We're going to and some big East and Midwest
win it in Michigan," he told a states began falling into the,
chilled throng of some 15,000 Carter column, and Mississippi'sI
fans. seven electoral voints finallv

versy with telegrams to bl
clergymen. There were scat

JR. WALKER
AND
the Alistars
special guest masquerade
SUNDAY, NOV. 1- "P.M.

ack Later, in Flint, Carter ham-
te t- mered away at the condition of'
the economy, trust in govern-
ment and national unity. He
hurried through his standard
"I see a nation . . ." speech
and emphasized the need for a
heavy voter turnout. Again and
again, he told the solidly Demo-
cratic auditorium of supporters:
"I think it's time for a change,
in Washington."
Sidekick Walter Mondale pre-
ceeded Carter, emphasizing the
plight of the jobless in Michi.
gan. "Hoover said you couldn't
"put people to work - but
Roosevelt did. Eisenhower said
you couldn't put people to work
- but Kennedy did. Nixon and
Ford said you couldn't put peo-
ple to woi'k - but Carter and
Mondale will." It was a tribute

put the peanut farmer over the
top.
The vote showed that Ameri-C
cans, indeed, were hurting for
a change. Unemployment, in-
flation, a shoulder - high stack
of vetoes, the Nixon pardon, an
unfortunate choice for a run-
ning mate, and a generally me-
diocre performance in office
all took their toll on President
Ford. It also showed a willing-
ness on the part of voters to
take risks: All the way up to
Election Day, Americans con-
sidered the Democrat an "un-j
known" whose course in the
Oval Office was, at best, a mat-I
ter of guesswork.
And so, a born-again Demo-I
cratic Party was back in the
White House, after an eight-
year absence, fresh with fat ma-

$3.50 (Dancing)

994-5350

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THE CENTER FOR COORDINATION OF
ANCIENT & MODERN STUDIES
PRESENTS A PUBLIC INTERDISCIPLINARY
U OF M COLLOQUIUM ON
HAS DEMOCRACY- SURVIVED?
PERSPECTIVES ANCIENT
& MODERN
SESSION III: THE PERILS OF DEMOCRACY
FEATURED SPEAKER
PROFESSOR RAM JETHMALANI
Currently visiting professor of law at Wayne State Uni-
versity, Indian political exile, former Senior Advocate of
the Supreme Court of India, and Chairman of the Bar
Council of India.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 7:30-9:30 p.m.
in the KUENZEL ROOM, MICHIGAN UNION

ANN A 0CI FILM CE-0CI
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TONIGHT in MLB
TWO FEATURE FILMS FROM CANADA
GOIN' DOWN THE ROAD
(Donald Shebid, 1970) 7,ONLY
A beautiful, simply told story of two friends with more ambition
than talent who head for the big city to seek their fortune. The
perfect example of a low budget film with grace and dignity,
GOIN' DOWN THE ROAD is one of the best films to cross the
Canadian border in either direction in a long time.
MON ONCLE ANTOINE
(Claude Jutra, 1972) 9 ONLY
Desire and death and the coming of age are the themes of this
fresh picturesque film from Quebec. The story centers around
Benoit, a young man who works in a store owned by his uncle-
who is also the town undertaker. We follow his amours with
Carmen, the-girl-next-door. A moving film not often seen in the
States. Grand prize winner at the 1970 Chicago Film Festival.
French with subtitles.
$1.25, DOUBLE FEATURE $2.00

jorities in the House, the Sen-
ate, and the nation's state-
houses. Surely, priorities will
change. Some of the poor can,
reasonably expect their lot to
improve somewhat. The major-
ity party in Congress will have
an easier time with legislation.
At week's end, the Ford and
Carter staffs were preparing for
the transition and the January
20 inauguration - when the!
changes will begin.
** *
So long Esch
MARVIN ESCH, Ann Arbor's
ten - year veteran of the
House of Representatives, found
himself out of a job after Tues-
day's election. "The people of
Michigan have elected me to
serve as a private citizen," he
observed wryly after his loss to
Democrat Donald Riegle.
Given a few more days of
campaigning - and media cov-
erage - the results may very

well have been otherwise. Rie-
gle was smarting from a double
dose of character assassination
in The Detroit News and mud-
slinging from the Esch cam-
paign team, and his wide lead
in the polls was eroding. But if
The News was out to elect
Esch, it had forgotten (or risk-
ed) the possibility of a sympa-
thetic backlash - whichaalmost
certainly accounted for at least
a handful of the Flint Demo-
crat's 1.8 million votes.
"If there ever was a time
when the people won a cam-
paign, it was tonight," Riegle
told his workers Tuesday, pro-
mising to fight for the people
of Michigan whenthe assumes
the retiring Philip Hart's seat
in January.
See-saw
jT MAY BE SEVERAL days-
or even weeks - before
Michigan's Second Congres-

BACK
sional District learns who its
new representative -will be in
the U. S. House of Representa-
tives. It was a classic dead-
lock; in fact, it was the closest
congressional race in the na-
tion, and at week's end, Repub-
lican Carl Pursell clung to a
bare 347-vote lead over chal-
lenger Edward Pierce, the Dem-
ocratic physician from Ann Ar-
bor.
The vote tally fluctuated all
day Wednesday, giving the ma-
jority first to Pierce, then to
Pursell. But the Wayne and
Washtenaw county returns were
strewn with errors, mix-ups and
inconsistent addition. Recounts
and county canvasses would be
necessary before the winner
could be determined, but Pursell
pronounced himself "sort of
cautiously jubiliant", a n d
Pierce felt as though he were
at the bottom of a roller coast-
er ride. Still, Pursell's thin
margin left plenty of room for
the Democrat to slip ahead
when county canvassing is com-
pleted, possibly as soon as to-
morrow.
Other winners
ITHER LOCAL votes were,
. for the most part, kind to
incumlients - with one notable
exception. Republican Thomas
Minick pummelled Washtenaw.
County Sheriff Frederick Pos-
till in the Democrat's bid for
re-election, thus taking the
county back on a conservative
road of law enforcement that
will almost surely lead to more
frequent (and more trivial) drug
arrests in the area and the un-
ionization of sheriff's deputies
with the scandal - ridden Inter-
national Brotherhood of Team-
sters.
Liberal Democrat Perry Bul-
lard beat his Republican op-
ponent, John Dietrich, by a
better than two-to-one margin
for his third term in the state
legislature;dDemocratsGerald
Dunn and Robert Nederlander
won easy re-election to the Uni-
versity Board of Regents; and
conservative County Prosecutor
William Delhey survived a
scare from his young, relatively
inexperienced Democratic op-
ponent, George Steeh.
Michigan voters also approved
th controversial ban on throw-
away beverage containers, de-
spite a heavy media blitz by
bottlemakers. They rejected -
to the surprise of many pessi-
mistic onlookers - a shoddy
and potentially damaging "tax-
payers' bill", Proposal C, and
turned down, for the third time,
a referendum to institute a
state graduated income tax.
* * *
GEO
THE IMPOTENCE of the
graduate student assistants'
union last week must have sur-
prised even the University. .
GEO had been bargaining
fruitlessly for a grab bag of
economic, class size and "prin-
ciple" clauses to be included
in its contract with the Univer-
sity, but the big 'U', character-
istically, was intransigent.
GEO's last hope-if it ever hd
one - was to cripple the Uni-
versity with a rerun of its Feb-
ruary, 1975, walkout.
But the results of the .union's
three-day referendum, released
Monday, demonstrated that the
teaching assistants were in no
mood for a strike. On the con-
trary, the union membership
elected to seek as quick a set-
tlement as possible. The fight-

ing instinct of the fledgling la-
bor group was gone, and its
contract will almost certainly
suffe'r for it.
"It appears that many people
have to be greatly abused be-
fore they are willing to take
the strong action needed to pro-
tect themselves," said a dis-
heartened GEO President Doug
Moran after the 498-214 vote
was tabulated. "Without a strike
threat it's going to be very
hard to win issues . .. that are
sacred."

A

W

I

a
...
w..

TOMORROW, Monday in MLB

JULES DASSIN'S

1962

-

I"

TO ALL STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
(Fraternities, Sororities, Clubs, Dorm Houses, Student Gov'ts, Etc.)
To include your house or organization in the 1977
MICHIGANENSIAN YEARBOOK, you must con-
tact Gordon Weider at 764-0561.
You may include whatever you want on your page,
including group picture, candjds, and a story. The
ENSIAN will'take your group picture for you.

PHAEDRA
7 ONLY
Director Jules Dassin turns to ancient Greek legend and Euripi-
dean drama to create a modern version of the tragic story of the
queen who falls in love with her stepson. A poignant, exquisitely
designed drama. Melina Mercouri, Afthony Perkins and Raf
Valione.
JACQUES DERAY'S 1970
BORSALINO
9 ONLY
A loving tribute to American gangster films that prompted
normally understated, reserved Stanley K a u f f m a n to write,
"BREATHLESS was about the effect of the Bogart persona . . .
BORSALINO is the thing itself . . . a gorgeous ballet danced to
the memory of ANGELS WITH DIRTY FACES and THE ROAR-
ING TWENTIES. The whole feeling is as if this were a lost film
suddenly turned up in the vaults of Warners.. ...Two of the
most tired words in film discourse are 'homage' and camp.' I
wish .at this moment, that the terms were less tired. BORSALINO
takes its hat off to a popular art form that was once done non-
camp, and so becomes a formal tribute, amidst the gore to what
the cat begat." zmiuelc by Claude Bolling. With Jean-Paul Bel-
mondo and Alain Delon. French with subtitles.

DEADLINE IS NOV. 19th

MICHIGANEISIAN GROUP PICTURES ... CALL NOW FOR YOURS

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